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New Grey, bornavirus advice please!! (and thank u :)

jmorris124

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Julia Morris
I bought a baby african grey (I know shopping is bad, but I looked everywhere for a rescue and couldn't find one) and I'm scheduled to take her home august 1st once she weans. I visit her almost every day, I've already taught her to eat chop, and have so many toys, a huge cage, play stand, acrylic carrier, etc. for her already. But my vet thinks my lovebird at home might have bornavirus because he plucks. I'll get results of his blood/feather test next week. Is it a bad decision to bring this grey home? Or would keeping them in separate rooms and cleaning really well do the trick? Has anyone ever had a flock where only one bird had bornavirus? How worried should I be? I am in love with this grey and would go to the ends of the earth for her. I am beyond devestated at the thought of not having her, but I will do what's best for her. Any advice helps. Thank you guys :)
 

Zara

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Is it a bad decision to bring this grey home?
I think you should wait for the test results for yyour lovebird first. It could be something else causing the plucking.
Then take things from there...
 

jmorris124

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Julia Morris
I just wanted to update you guys- my avian veterinarian (one of the top avian vets in the country) contacted me after hearing that I had some reservations about bringing this infant bird into my home, and he assured me on a few things that I thought might be helpful to share! :)

Bornavirus is a very slow-spreading virus that is not airborne, only a risk when ingesting feces/regurgitation of an infected bird. 15-50 % (at least 1/3rd) of all parrots have bornavirus, and at least 2/3rds of all pluckers have bornavirus. Anti-inflammatory drugs have been successful in treating symptoms of PDD- a disease that is believed to be caused by bornavirus, though more research is needed. There is no cure for bornavirus or PDD. Keeping a healthy bird at least across the room from an infected bird is sufficient at keeping the disease isolated to those who are infected. The risks are slim to none- my vet's words! As long as you're careful, i.e. always handle your birds in an aseptic order (saving an infected bird for last), diligently maintain clean enclosures using bird-safe disinfectants, watching closely for signs of illness (all of which should be routine for any bird keeper) then the risks are "extremely low". Obviously this all makes me so happy, I hope this helps somebody who may have been in a similar situation. If you have any more information, post it here! Thank you guys for your responses. What a helpful platform this is. :)
 

Hankmacaw

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Yes, ABV is widespread as is PDD (two different things). I hope you read the article I posted by Dr. Dalhausen, it says much the same as your Dr. told you, but he is much more cautious than your Dr.

@jmorris124 you do not want a bird with clinical PDD - you watch them die every day and it definitely is a death sentence. Many never convert from ABV to PDD, but you must be aware that the risk is there.
 

jmorris124

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I loved the article, thank you for sharing! It's hard to find relevant up-to-date information about this, I really appreciate it. ABV and PDD are two entirely different things indeed, thank goodness. The more we learn about these diseases the more we uncover about their true severity. I'll keep my gray in another room and use different cleaning tools, supplies, toys, stands, etc. so that I can be sure there will be no transmission. As far as I'm concerned this gray is my child (I'm sure many can relate to that) and it is no longer a matter of whether or not she will come home with me, it is a matter of how I will care for her. I will not be engaging with your comment on how my avian vet is not cautious. I appreciate your input very much! If anyone has any more tips for me or any more information I would love to hear from you. :)
 
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