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(Requesting) African gray breeding advice

Elijah131

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I’ve been looking into a pair of grays who are both of age and fertile according to some vet analysis papers. For some reason though they are just having a hard time reproducing. Their owner says they’re around 13 and they’ve been together for a long time, the hen lays one of the eggs are fertile. They stay in the same cage and she said the hen will begin to pluck if the nest box is removed.

I have done a small amount of research trying to see if I can solve the problem if I decide to move forward with it but I wanted to see if someone more experienced than I has had any of these issues and how they helped them. some general things I saw that could be the issue are:

They might need more privacy: there is a cockatoo caged nest them and it might be too much noise for them to feel private and comfortable.

they were put together too early: some people said if they are together too early it might trigger an instinct to not reproduce to avoid inbreeding.

thanks for replies I appreciate it ahead of time. I am very new when it comes to breeding and I love grays a lot so this seems like a dream come true if I can make it work.
 

Zara

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For breeding problems; Do they actually mate?

For the housing situation; Maybe bringing the pair home and giving them a forever home without the pressure of breeding them could be an option? They could be incompatible, but I´m sure will make wonderful feathered companions :)
 

Elijah131

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For breeding problems; Do they actually mate?

For the housing situation; Maybe bringing the pair home and giving them a forever home without the pressure of breeding them could be an option? They could be incompatible, but I´m sure will make wonderful feathered companions :)
That’s a fair point, no they don’t actually mate. The hen will lay but they always turn out infertile.
 

Zara

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They will always be infertile if they don´t mate.
It is impossible to lay a fertile egg without mating, and even some birds that do mate will lay infertile eggs.

I have a bonded pair of lovebirds and the hen will lay eggs, but I know they are all infertile as they don´t mate.
 

Matto

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So it's possible that in a different environment they will mate, however there's no guarantee of this.
 

Ripshod

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To want to breed in the first place they need the right conditions. They need a good home (cage and outside the cage), plenty of good healthy nutritious food. Plenty of activities (mental and physical). They need to be fit and healthy. There's plenty more, but basically if they're in the wrong place they won't want to. Would you?
 

jh81

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This was misdirected and unhelpful.
I do think there’s a point though.. while breeding can be a wonderful experience, ask yourself if you really want to breed greys, only to have them ended up in a shelter :(
 

jh81

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Do we have to have this discussion any time someone asks for help on the breeding forum.
Yes.

for the bird’s sake, yes.

There’s nothing wrong with breeding parrots, it can be a wonderful experience. But it is something to be taken seriously. And people too easily start breeding whatever animals while never thinking about what (can) happens to the animals after they are released from their care.

So yes, i think its perfectly reasonable to ask someone if they have thought it through.
 

Elijah131

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They will always be infertile if they don´t mate.
It is impossible to lay a fertile egg without mating, and even some birds that do mate will lay infertile eggs.

I have a bonded pair of lovebirds and the hen will lay eggs, but I know they are all infertile as they don´t mate.
I’m sorry I knew that. I was more asking if at this point it would be pointless to try and get their environment right for them to breed or if there was still a chance.
 

Elijah131

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Yes.

for the bird’s sake, yes.

There’s nothing wrong with breeding parrots, it can be a wonderful experience. But it is something to be taken seriously. And people too easily start breeding whatever animals while never thinking about what (can) happens to the animals after they are released from their care.

So yes, i think its perfectly reasonable to ask someone if they have thought it through.
I have been around and taken care of birds my whole life. I am still pretty young but I have always been fascinated with grays and learning that they were endangered a couple years ago has drawn me to want to help conserve their species. I have always wanted to try my hand at breeding anyhow. I love parrots, animals of all kind For that matter. I really want to try my hand at this.
 

Elijah131

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To want to breed in the first place they need the right conditions. They need a good home (cage and outside the cage), plenty of good healthy nutritious food. Plenty of activities (mental and physical). They need to be fit and healthy. There's plenty more, but basically if they're in the wrong place they won't want to. Would you?
No I wouldn’t that’s a very good point. Do you think it’s be a good idea to work out a large jungle gym for them to hang out on outside of the cage or would that be a bad idea? ( I’ve only ever been around and worked with companion parrots or parrots that are pretty tame)
 

Zara

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I’m sorry I knew that. I was more asking if at this point it would be pointless to try and get their environment right for them to breed or if there was still a chance.
Sorry, I do not know the answer. I agree with what @Matto said:
So it's possible that in a different environment they will mate, however there's no guarantee of this.
.
. Do you think it’s be a good idea to work out a large jungle gym for them to hang out on outside of the cage or would that be a bad idea?
I think that is a good idea regardless of breeding :)
 

Mockinbirdiva

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Breeders sell their pairs that don't produce for them. It's money out of pocket when they can't make any money off any offspring and if there are no offspring there's no reason for them to keep them. It frees up space for a breeder to bring new birds in that will produce... just cold hard facts in the breeders world. And... some breeders don't tell the truth just to get rid of them. I do agree the greys may not feel comfortable with a bird ( or birds) of a different species housed next to them if there is but just wire separating them and they have visual and sound distractions. Have you even seen where they are currently kept so you can evaluate any problems these birds may be currently experiencing? ( Size of enclosure? type of nestbox provided for them? Diet?)

And what exactly are the vet analysis papers? What is the history of each one? ( from hatching to current age... and how old are they?)
 
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