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What bird would be good for me?

ZY28

Strolling the yard
Joined
1/1/21
Messages
93
I have been researching for a pet bird, but none seem to be good for me. I wonder if someone would have any suggestions.

I can commit 50 years for a bird.
I do live in a condo right now.
I never own a bird before.
I would like to have a cuddly bird.
I have minor allergies.
I would love to do training with my bird, and I would like to be able to flight train it.
It would be a bonus if he or her could talk, but it is not that important.

I know each bird is different but what species generally speaking would be good for me?
I also wonder if a male or female would be good.

Thanks a lot!
 

Aves

Rollerblading along the road
Joined
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1,472
Location
Utah
Mammals like to be cuddled, birds most often don't like to be cuddled. If you want something to cuddle get a guinea pig or something.
All birds can be trained.
 

ZY28

Strolling the yard
Joined
1/1/21
Messages
93
Mammals like to be cuddled, birds most often don't like to be cuddled. If you want something to cuddle get a guinea pig or something.
All birds can be trained.
What i meant wiht cuddly was more affectionate. More specifictly i don't want a bird that i can only watch behing a glass. I want a bird that i can interact with.
 

Karearea

Meeting neighbors
Joined
12/1/20
Messages
53
Normally I'd suggest a cockatiel, but those allergies may become an issue. Maybe try looking into pionus parrots? They seem to cover a lot of your points, and there are plenty of different pionus species to choose from.
Male and female traits depend a lot on the specific type of bird. However, with females, you may have to deal with infertile eggs.

Edit : Not all birds enjoy cuddles, even in the same species. It'll also be a good idea to meet some birds in person (maybe take care of a friend's for the day) so you can get the feel of what they require. They are definitely not easy animals.
 
Last edited:

Zara

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I can commit 50 years for a bird.
A lovebird can live up to 20 years.

I do live in a condo right now.
Smaller birds do better in apartments. Larger birds, not so much.

I never own a bird before.
Research well before bringing home a companion. If you can volunteer at a pet shop or shelter that will help you gain some experience.

I would like to have a cuddly bird.
As already said, birds tend not to be cuddly, but a lovebird can be quite the companion. A single bird will require lots of one on one time with plenty of interaction and playtime.

I have minor allergies.
You may want to look at fostering first to see how you fare with a bird before commiting to one of your own. Plus if things go well during the fostering, you could apply to adopt them.

I would love to do training with my bird, and I would like to be able to flight train it.
What do you mean Flight train? Recall trianing?

It would be a bonus if he or her could talk, but it is not that important.

I know each bird is different but what species generally speaking would be good for me?

A peach faced lovebird maybe?
If you´re willing to put in the work researching and trying to find somewhere to get a little hands on experience, they can be a great choice for someone who has never had a bird before. But if you just get one without knowing much about the species, you can find yourself having problems.

I also wonder if a male or female would be good.
Male if possible.
 

MnGuy

Jogging around the block
Joined
4/24/17
Messages
709
Q: I do live in a condo right now.

A: That is a huge limiting factor, but it's doable. I had a Meyer's parrot in an apartment for years and no one complained. While every bird is an individual and any bird can and will be loud on occasion, I found her to be relatively quiet in the sense that she was not a constant screamer and when she did scream, her volume was low compared to equally sized birds known for being loud (some conures) or larger birds like macaws. I also find some species' calls/screams (lovebirds) to be sharper and more irritating than other species that might be louder, so make sure you do your research.

Q: I never own a bird before.

A: Have you tried fostering, volunteering with a rescue or meeting any friends' birds to see how you like birds? They are so different from other commonly kept pets, and it takes a different psychology to live with them so they thrive and trust you.

Q: I would like to have a cuddly bird.

A: Honestly, I've never understood why so many people on this forum get defensive when someone says they want a cuddly bird. Every bird is an individual and certainly any bird could be NOT cuddly, but so can any other pet. I don't think guinea pigs are cuddly at all. A lot of popular small mammal pets (guinea pigs, hamsters, rabbits, gerbils, etc.) generally hate cuddling and being held for extended periods of time. They tolerate being held and some may enjoy being stroked. Very few of the cats I've met in my lifetime enjoyed being cuddled in the traditional sense of the word -- some liked to be pet on their terms, most enjoyed trying to suffocate me in my sleep.

The only pet I think you can reliably say likes to cuddle is dogs, and even then they are individuals. One of my dogs loves to be pet and hugged but hates cuddling on the couch or while she's "relaxing," and will not sleep in the same bed with another dog or a human; the other dog loves cuddling at all times.

That said, I've found a lot of the birds I've kept (budgies when I was a kid, my Meyer's as an adult) craved physical contact and loved cuddling up in my hand, on my shoulder against my neck/head or on my chest under my chin or in my shirt pocket. My CAG likes head scratches and will occasionally like to rest on my chest for some pets, but I would not call her cuddly at all.

YES, I will keep repeating that every bird is an individual and you could end up with a bird that does not want physical contact and that you should not make it a top priority, but I don't think it's out of line for people to say they are looking for a bird that is more affectionate than it is aloof. That said, it's not good to trigger hormonal/breeding responses with your physical contact, and an overly need bird that always wants to cuddle is a huge pain that can interfere with your daily activity or result in constant screaming, so be careful what you wish for. You also have to be watchful about your own safety around your bird's beak.

I highly recommend adopting an adult parrot whose needs, personality and behavior are more apparent and understood, although nothing is guaranteed because a parrot's behavior is highly tailored to how they feel about a person and situation. I adopted my Meyer's when she was 17 and while she was the angriest bird I've ever met, she became very cuddly and affectionate over time.

Q: I have minor allergies.

A: Do you know what your allergic to? And how bad are your allergies? My allergist said I should not have any pets, but here I am. Volunteering or fostering birds will help you gauge your sensitivity so you and a bird aren't put in a bad position later on. I have an air filter right next to my CAG's cage and another one just several feet away in my living room.

Q: I would love to do training with my bird, and I would like to be able to flight train it.

A: I have no personal experience with this.

Q: It would be a bonus if he or her could talk, but it is not that important.

A: Good not to make this a priority because even birds that talk don't talk on cue, won't say what you want them to when you want them to, and can become too fetishized by people. My CAG has a huge vocabulary but actually doesn't talk a ton. She was adopted so she came with that vocabulary and has added to it over time.

Q: I know each bird is different but what species generally speaking would be good for me?

A: I'm very partial to the poicephalus species: Meyer's, Senegals, etc. They aren't small and they aren't big. They generally aren't known for being screamers. (Do I need to keep repeating that every bird is an individual and there are no guarantees, or, can we just accept that every comment and recommendation comes with that caveat?) Senegals are often found in rescues needing adoption. I did find with my Meyer's and have read that the species tend to be aggressive with other birds.

A: I also wonder if a male or female would be good.

Q: I think this issue can vary depending on the species you are considering. My Meyer's was female and my CAG is female, and I've had no special issues with them. Females may occasionally lay eggs, so you have to consider the possibility of any health issues that come with that. If they do lay eggs, you have to let them sit on them for awhile so they don't keep laying, and they can be very territorial during that time (1 month or more) and are completely hands-off.

Good luck.
 

TheBirds

Walking the driveway
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Messages
285
Location
Ontario, Canada
:agreed:

I second the Peachface Lovebird! They're very clownish and love to play with toys, are easy to house *relative to larger species* (although they do use all the space you give them so get as big a cage as you're able), and aren't generally screamers. They come in many different kinds of colour mutations too, which many other species don't.

I have two and find them quite cuddly and affectionate as far as parrots go, and my first was quick to pick-up on target training and the "step up" command. He's easy to get back into his cage and I don't have to worry about losing a finger if he decides to be difficult (he hasn't bitten at all.. yet). The other is still a baby so I don't like to assume his/her personality will stay as-is, but even s/he is a delight :)
 

ZY28

Strolling the yard
Joined
1/1/21
Messages
93
Normally I'd suggest a cockatiel, but those allergies may become an issue. Maybe try looking into pionus parrots? They seem to cover a lot of your points, and there are plenty of different pionus species to choose from.
Male and female traits depend a lot on the specific type of bird. However, with females, you may have to deal with infertile eggs.

Edit : Not all birds enjoy cuddles, even in the same species. It'll also be a good idea to meet some birds in person (maybe take care of a friend's for the day) so you can get the feel of what they require. They are definitely not easy animals.
I am thinking about pionus!!!
 

ZY28

Strolling the yard
Joined
1/1/21
Messages
93
Q: I do live in a condo right now.

A: That is a huge limiting factor, but it's doable. I had a Meyer's parrot in an apartment for years and no one complained. While every bird is an individual and any bird can and will be loud on occasion, I found her to be relatively quiet in the sense that she was not a constant screamer and when she did scream, her volume was low compared to equally sized birds known for being loud (some conures) or larger birds like macaws. I also find some species' calls/screams (lovebirds) to be sharper and more irritating than other species that might be louder, so make sure you do your research.

Q: I never own a bird before.

A: Have you tried fostering, volunteering with a rescue or meeting any friends' birds to see how you like birds? They are so different from other commonly kept pets, and it takes a different psychology to live with them so they thrive and trust you.

Q: I would like to have a cuddly bird.

A: Honestly, I've never understood why so many people on this forum get defensive when someone says they want a cuddly bird. Every bird is an individual and certainly any bird could be NOT cuddly, but so can any other pet. I don't think guinea pigs are cuddly at all. A lot of popular small mammal pets (guinea pigs, hamsters, rabbits, gerbils, etc.) generally hate cuddling and being held for extended periods of time. They tolerate being held and some may enjoy being stroked. Very few of the cats I've met in my lifetime enjoyed being cuddled in the traditional sense of the word -- some liked to be pet on their terms, most enjoyed trying to suffocate me in my sleep.

The only pet I think you can reliably say likes to cuddle is dogs, and even then they are individuals. One of my dogs loves to be pet and hugged but hates cuddling on the couch or while she's "relaxing," and will not sleep in the same bed with another dog or a human; the other dog loves cuddling at all times.

That said, I've found a lot of the birds I've kept (budgies when I was a kid, my Meyer's as an adult) craved physical contact and loved cuddling up in my hand, on my shoulder against my neck/head or on my chest under my chin or in my shirt pocket. My CAG likes head scratches and will occasionally like to rest on my chest for some pets, but I would not call her cuddly at all.

YES, I will keep repeating that every bird is an individual and you could end up with a bird that does not want physical contact and that you should not make it a top priority, but I don't think it's out of line for people to say they are looking for a bird that is more affectionate than it is aloof. That said, it's not good to trigger hormonal/breeding responses with your physical contact, and an overly need bird that always wants to cuddle is a huge pain that can interfere with your daily activity or result in constant screaming, so be careful what you wish for. You also have to be watchful about your own safety around your bird's beak.

I highly recommend adopting an adult parrot whose needs, personality and behavior are more apparent and understood, although nothing is guaranteed because a parrot's behavior is highly tailored to how they feel about a person and situation. I adopted my Meyer's when she was 17 and while she was the angriest bird I've ever met, she became very cuddly and affectionate over time.

Q: I have minor allergies.

A: Do you know what your allergic to? And how bad are your allergies? My allergist said I should not have any pets, but here I am. Volunteering or fostering birds will help you gauge your sensitivity so you and a bird aren't put in a bad position later on. I have an air filter right next to my CAG's cage and another one just several feet away in my living room.

Q: I would love to do training with my bird, and I would like to be able to flight train it.

A: I have no personal experience with this.

Q: It would be a bonus if he or her could talk, but it is not that important.

A: Good not to make this a priority because even birds that talk don't talk on cue, won't say what you want them to when you want them to, and can become too fetishized by people. My CAG has a huge vocabulary but actually doesn't talk a ton. She was adopted so she came with that vocabulary and has added to it over time.

Q: I know each bird is different but what species generally speaking would be good for me?

A: I'm very partial to the poicephalus species: Meyer's, Senegals, etc. They aren't small and they aren't big. They generally aren't known for being screamers. (Do I need to keep repeating that every bird is an individual and there are no guarantees, or, can we just accept that every comment and recommendation comes with that caveat?) Senegals are often found in rescues needing adoption. I did find with my Meyer's and have read that the species tend to be aggressive with other birds.

A: I also wonder if a male or female would be good.

Q: I think this issue can vary depending on the species you are considering. My Meyer's was female and my CAG is female, and I've had no special issues with them. Females may occasionally lay eggs, so you have to consider the possibility of any health issues that come with that. If they do lay eggs, you have to let them sit on them for awhile so they don't keep laying, and they can be very territorial during that time (1 month or more) and are completely hands-off.

Good luck.
Maybe I should wait a bit. Covid limits the opportunities to volunteer and foster. Thanks for all the info
 

ZY28

Strolling the yard
Joined
1/1/21
Messages
93
Q: I do live in a condo right now.

A: That is a huge limiting factor, but it's doable. I had a Meyer's parrot in an apartment for years and no one complained. While every bird is an individual and any bird can and will be loud on occasion, I found her to be relatively quiet in the sense that she was not a constant screamer and when she did scream, her volume was low compared to equally sized birds known for being loud (some conures) or larger birds like macaws. I also find some species' calls/screams (lovebirds) to be sharper and more irritating than other species that might be louder, so make sure you do your research.

Q: I never own a bird before.

A: Have you tried fostering, volunteering with a rescue or meeting any friends' birds to see how you like birds? They are so different from other commonly kept pets, and it takes a different psychology to live with them so they thrive and trust you.

Q: I would like to have a cuddly bird.

A: Honestly, I've never understood why so many people on this forum get defensive when someone says they want a cuddly bird. Every bird is an individual and certainly any bird could be NOT cuddly, but so can any other pet. I don't think guinea pigs are cuddly at all. A lot of popular small mammal pets (guinea pigs, hamsters, rabbits, gerbils, etc.) generally hate cuddling and being held for extended periods of time. They tolerate being held and some may enjoy being stroked. Very few of the cats I've met in my lifetime enjoyed being cuddled in the traditional sense of the word -- some liked to be pet on their terms, most enjoyed trying to suffocate me in my sleep.

The only pet I think you can reliably say likes to cuddle is dogs, and even then they are individuals. One of my dogs loves to be pet and hugged but hates cuddling on the couch or while she's "relaxing," and will not sleep in the same bed with another dog or a human; the other dog loves cuddling at all times.

That said, I've found a lot of the birds I've kept (budgies when I was a kid, my Meyer's as an adult) craved physical contact and loved cuddling up in my hand, on my shoulder against my neck/head or on my chest under my chin or in my shirt pocket. My CAG likes head scratches and will occasionally like to rest on my chest for some pets, but I would not call her cuddly at all.

YES, I will keep repeating that every bird is an individual and you could end up with a bird that does not want physical contact and that you should not make it a top priority, but I don't think it's out of line for people to say they are looking for a bird that is more affectionate than it is aloof. That said, it's not good to trigger hormonal/breeding responses with your physical contact, and an overly need bird that always wants to cuddle is a huge pain that can interfere with your daily activity or result in constant screaming, so be careful what you wish for. You also have to be watchful about your own safety around your bird's beak.

I highly recommend adopting an adult parrot whose needs, personality and behavior are more apparent and understood, although nothing is guaranteed because a parrot's behavior is highly tailored to how they feel about a person and situation. I adopted my Meyer's when she was 17 and while she was the angriest bird I've ever met, she became very cuddly and affectionate over time.

Q: I have minor allergies.

A: Do you know what your allergic to? And how bad are your allergies? My allergist said I should not have any pets, but here I am. Volunteering or fostering birds will help you gauge your sensitivity so you and a bird aren't put in a bad position later on. I have an air filter right next to my CAG's cage and another one just several feet away in my living room.

Q: I would love to do training with my bird, and I would like to be able to flight train it.

A: I have no personal experience with this.

Q: It would be a bonus if he or her could talk, but it is not that important.

A: Good not to make this a priority because even birds that talk don't talk on cue, won't say what you want them to when you want them to, and can become too fetishized by people. My CAG has a huge vocabulary but actually doesn't talk a ton. She was adopted so she came with that vocabulary and has added to it over time.

Q: I know each bird is different but what species generally speaking would be good for me?

A: I'm very partial to the poicephalus species: Meyer's, Senegals, etc. They aren't small and they aren't big. They generally aren't known for being screamers. (Do I need to keep repeating that every bird is an individual and there are no guarantees, or, can we just accept that every comment and recommendation comes with that caveat?) Senegals are often found in rescues needing adoption. I did find with my Meyer's and have read that the species tend to be aggressive with other birds.

A: I also wonder if a male or female would be good.

Q: I think this issue can vary depending on the species you are considering. My Meyer's was female and my CAG is female, and I've had no special issues with them. Females may occasionally lay eggs, so you have to consider the possibility of any health issues that come with that. If they do lay eggs, you have to let them sit on them for awhile so they don't keep laying, and they can be very territorial during that time (1 month or more) and are completely hands-off.

Good luck.
What do you mean by CAG? I hear this term but I forgot the meaning
 

camelotshadow

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Depending upon how much time you want to interact with the bird a GCC could be good. Small but not too small & they can form strong bonds with there people & I see many wanting close contact. They can be hyperactive & may want to be with you more than you have time for so you may have to give them lots of toys in a big cage to keep them entertained. They are very active energizer bunnies. Not really talkers though maybe a few words.

Since you are allergic the Meyers/ Senegals are also powder down birds like tiels but truthfully I never noticed anything with a Meyers I had for 3 years but she was a alert Meyers who was vocal every few minutes so there a loud call rhythmically all day. She came from a house where she had her own room so she might have learned the need for a loud continuous contact call but as for quiet she did not get that memo.

I never had a lovebird but heard the call is not for everyone as people tolerate differently hi or lo pitched calls.

Rio is a Crimson Bellied Conure CBC. Sort of like a GCC but a bit stockier & tend to be more reserved. He's not very loud at all & does not go on scream fests. He will call a few times a day but its tolerable. Trouble is they are much harder to find than GCC but they are different imho.



Since you never had a bird volunteering in a rescue or even a bird store would be good experience on the constant sound & mess of a bird which will never stop so you have to be prepared for it for the next 30 years or so.

Pionus are larger so size will make them louder birds & they are better hands off birds.

You won't commonly see Pionus or CBC at shelters & very hard to find them for rehome adoption too.

Since you live in a condo & there are rules & others owners have more rights than apt renters noise could be a real issue. Have you looked into pet policy of your condo? How are your neighbors? You never know even the nicest neigbhor might work at home & the bird noise interrupts there life. Neighbors can sell a condo during the course of a birds life & what might have been OK for 10 years is suddenly a big problem.

Lots of things to consider besides the species when all birds except maybe budgie sounds will pass thru the walls.

Good Luck

Rio P1000788 perch small (2).jpg
 

ZY28

Strolling the yard
Joined
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Messages
93
Depending upon how much time you want to interact with the bird a GCC could be good. Small but not too small & they can form strong bonds with there people & I see many wanting close contact. They can be hyperactive & may want to be with you more than you have time for so you may have to give them lots of toys in a big cage to keep them entertained. They are very active energizer bunnies. Not really talkers though maybe a few words.

Since you are allergic the Meyers/ Senegals are also powder down birds like tiels but truthfully I never noticed anything with a Meyers I had for 3 years but she was a alert Meyers who was vocal every few minutes so there a loud call rhythmically all day. She came from a house where she had her own room so she might have learned the need for a loud continuous contact call but as for quiet she did not get that memo.

I never had a lovebird but heard the call is not for everyone as people tolerate differently hi or lo pitched calls.

Rio is a Crimson Bellied Conure CBC. Sort of like a GCC but a bit stockier & tend to be more reserved. He's not very loud at all & does not go on scream fests. He will call a few times a day but its tolerable. Trouble is they are much harder to find than GCC but they are different imho.



Since you never had a bird volunteering in a rescue or even a bird store would be good experience on the constant sound & mess of a bird which will never stop so you have to be prepared for it for the next 30 years or so.

Pionus are larger so size will make them louder birds & they are better hands off birds.

You won't commonly see Pionus or CBC at shelters & very hard to find them for rehome adoption too.

Since you live in a condo & there are rules & others owners have more rights than apt renters noise could be a real issue. Have you looked into pet policy of your condo? How are your neighbors? You never know even the nicest neigbhor might work at home & the bird noise interrupts there life. Neighbors can sell a condo during the course of a birds life & what might have been OK for 10 years is suddenly a big problem.

Lots of things to consider besides the species when all birds except maybe budgie sounds will pass thru the walls.

Good Luck

View attachment 368915
You bird is so cute !!!! Thanks for the info. I have just new neighbors that moved in! I have hear that they have birds! I was planning on asking them before I get the bird!.
 

camelotshadow

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You bird is so cute !!!! Thanks for the info. I have just new neighbors that moved in! I have hear that they have birds! I was planning on asking them before I get the bird!.
Great. Ask them what kind & let them know you were considering a bird. This way you'll know what type of bird & can listen for what kind of sound travels like. I think they too may be concerned about the bird noise & would be happy to know you were bird friendly. They might even give you advice or let you see the birds. Never know hopefully there birds donlt drive you crazy :rofl:
 

Zara

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I have just new neighbors that moved in! I have hear that they have birds!
I gifted a baby bird to my neighbour upstairs. And now, every so often my birds will call back and forth with little Charlie. I don´t know what my other neighbours think of that. It is quite the racket.
Just something to think about.
 

ZY28

Strolling the yard
Joined
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Messages
93
I gifted a baby bird to my neighbour upstairs. And now, every so often my birds will call back and forth with little Charlie. I don´t know what my other neighbours think of that. It is quite the racket.
Just something to think about.
I can't here there bird in my apt I can only hear them in the hallway .
 

sunnysmom

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Welcome to the forum!
 

tka

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If you can commit 50 years to a bird, then I'm assuming that you're pretty young. Are you in a stable living and employment situation? Parrots need specialist veterinary care and avian vet bills are expensive - a full check up and blood tests alone can cost a couple of hundred pounds/euros/dollars. If anything needs treatment, you may be looking at thousands. If you're likely to move around a lot, or want to work abroad, or if your job requires very long and/or unpredictable hours, or if you're likely to have to complete an undergraduate or postgraduate degree before you find work, then this is not a good time to get a bird.

What about relationships? Children? Many parrots tend to bond strongly to one person and be indifferent or even aggressive towards other people. If you have a partner, are they okay with a pet that may actively dislike them? If you're not in a relationship and hope to find a special someone, are you going to put the parrot first? What if you meet the love of your life and they hate your bird?

Children and parrots are generally not a good mix. Children are noisy and unpredictable and move quickly which parrots may find distressing, and a parrot could do real harm to a child. My parrot and my two year old niece tend to set each other off - they both find the other too loud. The toddler yells and the parrot gets alarmed and yells too, or vice versa.

Do you rent or own your place? If you rent, you must ensure that your landlord is happy with birds and is aware of the damage they can cause. If you live with other people, they must be aware of the changes they must make to ensure a bird's safety - no candles, air fresheners or incense, no teflon in cookware or other products, being incredibly aware of every open window and door, being vigilant about where the bird is at all times so they don't accidentally injure the bird or let it escape. It's a big lifestyle change that a lot of people aren't willing to make.
 
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