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What bird would be good for me?

Mizzely

Lil Monsters Bird Toys
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The best birds I've ever had I didn't go looking for - they found me! An adult bird past puberty who gets rehomed due to family changes is the jackpot :D If you can, I would wait until you have a chance to volunteer or foster as that is really the best thing, and I 100% wish I had not started with a baby bird!
 

ZY28

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If you can commit 50 years to a bird, then I'm assuming that you're pretty young. Are you in a stable living and employment situation? Parrots need specialist veterinary care and avian vet bills are expensive - a full check up and blood tests alone can cost a couple of hundred pounds/euros/dollars. If anything needs treatment, you may be looking at thousands. If you're likely to move around a lot, or want to work abroad, or if your job requires very long and/or unpredictable hours, or if you're likely to have to complete an undergraduate or postgraduate degree before you find work, then this is not a good time to get a bird.

What about relationships? Children? Many parrots tend to bond strongly to one person and be indifferent or even aggressive towards other people. If you have a partner, are they okay with a pet that may actively dislike them? If you're not in a relationship and hope to find a special someone, are you going to put the parrot first? What if you meet the love of your life and they hate your bird?

Children and parrots are generally not a good mix. Children are noisy and unpredictable and move quickly which parrots may find distressing, and a parrot could do real harm to a child. My parrot and my two year old niece tend to set each other off - they both find the other too loud. The toddler yells and the parrot gets alarmed and yells too, or vice versa.

Do you rent or own your place? If you rent, you must ensure that your landlord is happy with birds and is aware of the damage they can cause. If you live with other people, they must be aware of the changes they must make to ensure a bird's safety - no candles, air fresheners or incense, no teflon in cookware or other products, being incredibly aware of every open window and door, being vigilant about where the bird is at all times so they don't accidentally injure the bird or let it escape. It's a big lifestyle change that a lot of people aren't willing to make.
Thank you for responding . Yes I am young lol! I have been warned about these problems . My plan was to put time in socializing the parrot so he likes 60 me 40 my parents. So if anything happens knock on wood he could live a short amount of time with my mum. Children and parrots ouf you don't want that!!! I am not planning on having kids. If I want in the future I would make sure to get him to tolerate kids before. Financial is not a problem for me and I am really lucky for that (I would not consider a parrot otherwise). And I own the place. Thank for being so caring !
 

ZY28

Strolling the yard
Joined
1/1/21
Messages
103
If you can commit 50 years to a bird, then I'm assuming that you're pretty young. Are you in a stable living and employment situation? Parrots need specialist veterinary care and avian vet bills are expensive - a full check up and blood tests alone can cost a couple of hundred pounds/euros/dollars. If anything needs treatment, you may be looking at thousands. If you're likely to move around a lot, or want to work abroad, or if your job requires very long and/or unpredictable hours, or if you're likely to have to complete an undergraduate or postgraduate degree before you find work, then this is not a good time to get a bird.

What about relationships? Children? Many parrots tend to bond strongly to one person and be indifferent or even aggressive towards other people. If you have a partner, are they okay with a pet that may actively dislike them? If you're not in a relationship and hope to find a special someone, are you going to put the parrot first? What if you meet the love of your life and they hate your bird?

Children and parrots are generally not a good mix. Children are noisy and unpredictable and move quickly which parrots may find distressing, and a parrot could do real harm to a child. My parrot and my two year old niece tend to set each other off - they both find the other too loud. The toddler yells and the parrot gets alarmed and yells too, or vice versa.

Do you rent or own your place? If you rent, you must ensure that your landlord is happy with birds and is aware of the damage they can cause. If you live with other people, they must be aware of the changes they must make to ensure a bird's safety - no candles, air fresheners or incense, no teflon in cookware or other products, being incredibly aware of every open window and door, being vigilant about where the bird is at all times so they don't accidentally injure the bird or let it escape. It's a big lifestyle change that a lot of people aren't willing to make.
By the way how can I love someone that don't like birds or animals !
 

ZY28

Strolling the yard
Joined
1/1/21
Messages
103
The best birds I've ever had I didn't go looking for - they found me! An adult bird past puberty who gets rehomed due to family changes is the jackpot :D If you can, I would wait until you have a chance to volunteer or foster as that is really the best thing, and I 100% wish I had not started with a baby bird!
It is controversial to not start with a baby bird but I totally agree! People always saw to get the bird really young to form a solid bound. I don't think so. A bird at any age can have a solid bound with a person . I would love to volunteer and have a bird choose me ! I have been told that baby birds personality can change after puberty to!
 

tka

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Bear in mind that it's not just an issue of socialisation. Parrots decide who they like. You cannot decide for them that they'll split their affection 60:40 between you and your parents. Your hypothetical bird may decide that they adore your mum and want nothing to do with you.

I lived with my parents for the first six months I had Leia and she's sort of alright with them, despite the fact that they regularly gave her treats and interacted with her in those six months. She will occasionally step up for them or ask for a headscratch if I'm not around but I've had to deal with a lot of hurt parental feelings because Leia just isn't that interested in interacting with them. My partner moved in with us in March and has been on a charm offensive with Leia since then. Leia will happily and gently take an almond from her, but again isn't that interested in interacting with her even though my partner is around as much as I am.

I would recommend reading this article. Adult parrots are a very different kind of "pet" and you have to be part zookeeper and part animal behaviourist to establish and maintain a good relationship with them.

 

ZY28

Strolling the yard
Joined
1/1/21
Messages
103
Bear in mind that it's not just an issue of socialisation. Parrots decide who they like. You cannot decide for them that they'll split their affection 60:40 between you and your parents. Your hypothetical bird may decide that they adore your mum and want nothing to do with you.

I lived with my parents for the first six months I had Leia and she's sort of alright with them, despite the fact that they regularly gave her treats and interacted with her in those six months. She will occasionally step up for them or ask for a headscratch if I'm not around but I've had to deal with a lot of hurt parental feelings because Leia just isn't that interested in interacting with them. My partner moved in with us in March and has been on a charm offensive with Leia since then. Leia will happily and gently take an almond from her, but again isn't that interested in interacting with her even though my partner is around as much as I am.

I would recommend reading this article. Adult parrots are a very different kind of "pet" and you have to be part zookeeper and part animal behaviourist to establish and maintain a good relationship with them.

Yes I know, but I am saying ideally... Thanks for the article.
 

Sparkles99

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If you happen to know the layout of yours & your neighbours' condos, this could help you narrow down species, as could knowing what the walls are made of, &, consequently, their ability to dampen sound.

I placed my budgies' cage strategically where there is only one side shared with another apartment. That side happens to be the floor & sound rises.
 
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