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Housing Help? (NYC area)

ConureToo

Checking out the neighborhood
Joined
3/9/19
Messages
1
Real Name
Cara
Hi! I'm looking for some advice on birds, apartments, and housing.

I have a Goffins cockatoo and a maroon belly conure. My too is quiet for a too, but still a cockatoo, and my conure has her moments but otherwise is similar to a green cheek but more quiet than say a sun conure.

The three of us are in some need to relocate, either to a condo or an apartment. I know cockatoos and apartments are like an immediate concern and might be a bad idea, but I am not willing to give either of them up.

I'm wondering how to even go about asking landlords about birds and if they would be allowed? Also, I'm even more curious to know if there is anyone around where I'm looking that has a bird and lives in an apartment building (suburbs outside of NYC). Are there ways to tell which buildings are more suited for birds or anything?

Really any input is greatly appreciated. Thanks so much!
 

faislaq

I have a macaw and don't post enough photos
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Crash Test Dummy
Avenue Concierge
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10/25/16
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13,090
Location
Texas
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Karen
I don't live in NY, but the apartments around here don't seem to care about birds as pets because they assume they're in their cages 24/7 and don't even ask for a pet deposit for them. (The one time I'm glad bird ignorance exists!) The only time it would matter here is if they got noise complaints. Luckily our building is one of the quieter ones I've been in, but you do learn which walls might be thinner or less insulated. For instance, we know we can hear more through the front doors than you can standing in the unit next door & we can hear some sounds through our dining room and bathroom walls (just their radio, thank goodness) so we try to keep the birds away from those walls when we can. If you can get a unit with fewer common walls that would probably be the best. To test, maybe you could bring a friend with you and see how well you can hear one another from the hall, outside and from the different rooms?
 
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~Drini~

Rollerblading along the road
Avenue Veteran
Joined
2/22/14
Messages
1,530
Location
NYC
Real Name
Ulpiana
I am a college student here in NYC (in Manhattan, so things can be much more crowded than in the other boroughs, but I think the same stuff still applies). I don't have my birds with me because I live in a university dorm, but I have been able to explore a number of apartments throughout the city.

Basically: you just need to go see the apartment in person because there isn't really any other way to tell. Some apartments that I have been in have extraordinarily thin walls/ceilings and you can hear every sound from those living next to you. I have had friends be in difficult situations because their landlords wouldn't address their noise complaints about other tennants loudly doing various *cough cough* 'activities' at all hours of the night. It may be to your advantage (but also disadvantage) to find a landlord as lenient as that. Other apartments that I've seen had decent walls and I wouldn't be as hesitant to keep birds in there. You really just need to test it out in person. Word-of-mouth is also useful if you already have contacts in the area.
 
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