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Asthmatic Allergic patient and pet birds

monjur sayad

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monjur sayad
Hello, I have one question again, me and my family members has asthmatic problem. But, I want to pet birds. I bought 5 pair budgies and 1 pair cockatiels in difference room. No one sleep or stay in that room. I want to know health related question. Can I able to pet birds in this situation?? If yes which birds are less allergic problem? And Also I want to know, Which Steps I should follow to pet birds in this situation and Which birds produce more dusts and cause of allergic problem in asthma patients?? Is anyone in this forum who have asthmatic problem and pet birds?? Please help me. I Love Birds Very Much. Thanks
 

painesgrey

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I have slight asthma and terrible allergies, which pet danders seem to set off. Despite being allergic to nearly everything under the sun, I have no problem with keeping birds. However, I don't own any of the dustier species like cockatoos and cockatiels, so I'm not sure how I would react with them in the house. Though, I have worked extensively with all species (including 'tiels and 'toos) in the past and haven't noticed any problems.

However, each person is different!

If you are allergic to the point that it will cause trouble, you will likely know very quickly - and probably would already know by now. So I'd say it's probably perfectly fine for you to interact with the birds without worry, though I would keep an inhaler and antihistamines on hand just in case.

If you do have reactions, there are things you can do to prevent them. A doctor (ideally an ear, nose, and throat doctor) would probably be able to best walk you through your options, but antihistamine pills, nasal sprays, and eye drops are all things I've used liberally in the past to combat my allergic reactions, and they're all readily available over the counter.

As for the birds, you can invest in a good air filter and keep the humidity a little higher (~50%) to try to keep the dander out of the air. Frequent spray baths and regular cage cleanings (and misting the bottom of the cages with water before changing the papers) will all help a bit with keeping the dust down.

In general, people consider cockatoos, cockatiels, and african greys to be the dustier species.
 

monjur sayad

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monjur sayad
I have slight asthma and terrible allergies, which pet danders seem to set off. Despite being allergic to nearly everything under the sun, I have no problem with keeping birds. However, I don't own any of the dustier species like cockatoos and cockatiels, so I'm not sure how I would react with them in the house. Though, I have worked extensively with all species (including 'tiels and 'toos) in the past and haven't noticed any problems.

However, each person is different!

If you are allergic to the point that it will cause trouble, you will likely know very quickly - and probably would already know by now. So I'd say it's probably perfectly fine for you to interact with the birds without worry, though I would keep an inhaler and antihistamines on hand just in case.

If you do have reactions, there are things you can do to prevent them. A doctor (ideally an ear, nose, and throat doctor) would probably be able to best walk you through your options, but antihistamine pills, nasal sprays, and eye drops are all things I've used liberally in the past to combat my allergic reactions, and they're all readily available over the counter.

As for the birds, you can invest in a good air filter and keep the humidity a little higher (~50%) to try to keep the dander out of the air. Frequent spray baths and regular cage cleanings (and misting the bottom of the cages with water before changing the papers) will all help a bit with keeping the dust down.

In general, people consider cockatoos, cockatiels, and african greys to be the dustier species.
can love bird also dusty?and which species bird are you pet?and how many pair?and which room are you used for birds?
 

Brittany0208

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Lovebirds are not powder-down species ('toos, 'tiels, and Greys), so you should be alright if you get one (or however many)
 

painesgrey

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can love bird also dusty?and which species bird are you pet?and how many pair?and which room are you used for birds?
I have an Indian Ringneck, a Black-headed Caique, and a Quaker - only 3 birds total. When I first got my Quaker, I kept him in my bedroom and had no problems. After that, the three birds were in the living room - again, no problems with a good central air system. I just recently moved into a home that has no central air, but the birds are in their own room (an office off the living room) with an air filter. It's a little dustier, but that addition of an air filter in the living room and the bird room have made it negligible.

And as @Brittany0208 said, lovebirds aren't considered a dusty species.
 

Fergus Mom

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I would think it would largely depend on the severity of the asthma, for one important factor.
I have a good friend who's asthma worsened in the last 9 months since she got Cockatiels, but their
cages were kept in her bedroom and she spends 90 percent of her time in her bedroom. So after a bad asthma attack, she moved the birds out of her room to the dining room, and so far, so good.
When I read up on this issue, I read that all birds have some dander, but the ones known as the 'dusty birds' are worse for people with breathing conditions. My birds stay in my bedroom with me, but I have no more problems than usual so far. Good luck.
 

janicedyh

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Cockatiels are not the best birds for people with allergy issues or asthma. They are dust little guys even if you keep things clean.
 

charlieboy

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I have asthma and allergies and I live with a cockatiel! I've had no problems so far (had him for a month) except for when he shakes his dust in my face, but even then I just hold my breath and I'm fine lol! Worst case scenario is runny nose and sneezing but nothing I can't endure or that some antihistamines can't fix. When it happens I just put him in his cage for a lil while until it gets better. Don't have any issues petting my tiel, unless if I rub my eyes right after, they get a lil itchy but not much. So tiny issues with allergies, but none at all with asthma (he barely ever comes in my bedroom). But again, everyone is different and it is true cockatiels are super dusty (which is why I only have one). An air filter, having them bathe and cleaning their space often can help. I've also had budgies for most of my life with 0 issues. They are less dusty. :)
 
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monjur sayad

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monjur sayad
I would think it would largely depend on the severity of the asthma, for one important factor.
I have a good friend who's asthma worsened in the last 9 months since she got Cockatiels, but their
cages were kept in her bedroom and she spends 90 percent of her time in her bedroom. So after a bad asthma attack, she moved the birds out of her room to the dining room, and so far, so good.
When I read up on this issue, I read that all birds have some dander, but the ones known as the 'dusty birds' are worse for people with breathing conditions. My birds stay in my bedroom with me, but I have no more problems than usual so far. Good luck.
thanks. you suffer asthma? which bird are you pet? and how many pair?
 

Fergus Mom

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No, @monjur sayad - I do not have asthma, my friend does.
I have emphysema. I have two budgies.

I found this explaining the differences:
What's the difference between asthma and emphysema? ... Asthma is a spastic and inflammatory disease of the airways that causes reversible obstruction of the bronchial tubes. It usually responds to treatment. Emphysema is a disease of the lung tissue, especially the alveoli (air sacs) at the end of the bronchial tubes.
 
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