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Mehul93

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I purchased an Indian Ringneck (6 months old) around 4 days ago and has been in its cage since. Whenever I try to get really close to the cage it starts to frantically fly side to side and also does the same when I try to change its feed.

It isn't tame so would like for it to gain some trust in me to at least go near the cage. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to go about starting off? I've read in other forums and saw someone say to not give it any attention and carry on with my day. I've also read other forums saying I should spend time sitting and reading etc next to it. So I'm now completely confused about what to do! My IRN seems to spend the majority of the time on the left-hand side of the cage, perched on the bowl. That is the side that is close to any activity in the room (TV, living area).

Should I change to a cage that allows me to change the bowls from outside? Or stick to the one I have, where I need to put my hand in the cage?

So if there is anyone that can help me and get me started on getting my IRN to trust me and to start taming I'm all ears and would greatly appreciate the advice!
 

sunnysmom

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If you can change the bowls from the outside, I would. Hands in a cage can be scary and you want your bird to feel secure. I am in the sit and read to your bird camp. I think leaving them alone doesn't help things. But you want to take it slow. Don't sit too close if he's scared. Talk softly. Read- don't stare too much at him. And then start gradually getting closer, etc. If he's really scared you can try covering his cage on three sides leaving the front open,that way he doesn't have to be on "alert" for danger on all sides. Although if he's not used to be covered- that may scare him too- you'll have to see. But generally, birds feel a bit more secure that way.
 

Mehul93

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If you can change the bowls from the outside, I would. Hands in a cage can be scary and you want your bird to feel secure. I am in the sit and read to your bird camp. I think leaving them alone doesn't help things. But you want to take it slow. Don't sit too close if he's scared. Talk softly. Read- don't stare too much at him. And then start gradually getting closer, etc. If he's really scared you can try covering his cage on three sides leaving the front open,that way he doesn't have to be on "alert" for danger on all sides. Although if he's not used to be covered- that may scare him too- you'll have to see. But generally, birds feel a bit more secure that way.
Ok cool, I've got a new cage coming that will allow me to do that. I will also consider covering the sides up aswell.

This is what was the reply on another forum: "As to how long to stay in the room... well, I never do when I have a new bird. I just do what I need to do and simply ignore the new bird completely. As long as you do not look at it and act nonchalantly, the bird will slowly lose its fear of you. Nothing 'calms' a prey animal's fears more than being consistently ignored and having exactly the same routine every day."
 

sunnysmom

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Ok cool, I've got a new cage coming that will allow me to do that. I will also consider covering the sides up aswell.

This is what was the reply on another forum: "As to how long to stay in the room... well, I never do when I have a new bird. I just do what I need to do and simply ignore the new bird completely. As long as you do not look at it and act nonchalantly, the bird will slowly lose its fear of you. Nothing 'calms' a prey animal's fears more than being consistently ignored and having exactly the same routine every day."
Everyone has different opinions. I just know what I do. I foster birds for a local parrot rescue. I find that they like my presence if not direct attention. I think since birds are flock animals being alone is scary. But every bird is different so you have to kinda have to gage their reaction. I also don't leave them in total quiet except at bedtime and play music for them or leave the TV on for them during the day.
 

Crazy4parrots

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Ok cool, I've got a new cage coming that will allow me to do that. I will also consider covering the sides up aswell.

This is what was the reply on another forum: "As to how long to stay in the room... well, I never do when I have a new bird. I just do what I need to do and simply ignore the new bird completely. As long as you do not look at it and act nonchalantly, the bird will slowly lose its fear of you. Nothing 'calms' a prey animal's fears more than being consistently ignored and having exactly the same routine every day."
Actually I don’t agree you have to talk to the bird softly be there do all your activities read to it gives treats to it. Ignoring it could help it accept you are part of the background but as soon as you approach it won’t trust you cause you don’t share nothing with it.
 
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