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PLEASE HELP! 1 year old Indian Ringneck Trouble

stormynyx

Checking out the neighborhood
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8/13/20
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Hello everyone!

I have a 1 year old IRN (not sexed). Ive had him a year now and i feel like he’s no closer to me now than the day I got him. Ive tried multiple techniques, using a glove to hold his toes and this worked somewhat, hes learnt to step onto the glove (after some frantic screaming and jumping) to get out of his cage. Ive tried holding him in a towel, holding food at the bars everyday, sitting by the cage for hours, talking, singing, letting him stay out of the cage, keeping him in the cage etc. I just dont know what to do. He also screams near CONSTANTLY. Its like he’s screaming for attention, but no matter what I do he just screams louder. I love him beyond compare but I feel like my neighbours are going to end up complaining about the noise. I can hear him from outside! He bites and flies away if I move and absolutely hates hands. I can get close to him somewhat if I hide my hands, but the minute he sees them he flies away. Its also an absolute nightmare to get him back into his cage without having to chase him. I’ve tried with a perch but he just reacts the same as if it were a hand.

Im just lost on what to do. Theres so much contradicting advice and I feel like maybe I’m just naturally a repellent to him. The idea of having to leave him kills me. Please can anybody help?
 

Tvdv96

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I think your goal right now is to get him comfortable with leaving and entering the cage by himself. But also to trust your hands or arm (I read a lot of people train to step up on the arm instead of the hands) again.

The toe holding, towel grabbing and chasing to go back in to the cage probably didn't give your IRN a save feeling with hands. That's probably why he hates hands at this moment.

Your not naturally repellent to him, you just need to give him some time and do things at his own pace. As you mentioned before, it's best to go and sit by the cage and talk calmly to him, to get him used to you.
Leave the door open of the cage and let him come out on his own pace. And try to let him also get back in on his own pace, you can try to give him some food/treats in the cage to lure him back in.
And when he starts to show interest, you can try to give some treats out of your hand to him.
I got my CAG Sisi when she was about 7 years old, I really let her do things on her own pace. I left the cage open for her and let her come to me when she wanted to. To get her back in to her cage I gave her some food and then she climbed back in herself :)

I think these are the first steps you want to take, it's really important that they learn they can trust you and that they have time to get used to things. :)

I'm sure there will be some other members along to give you some more advice!
 

Monica

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Sorry you received some really poor advice! Forcing your attention on your bird is not the way to earn their trust. Offering food by hand likely didn't work either because he's too afraid.

It would be better to take a step back and offer a treat any time you walk by the cage. Once he gets more comfortable with you, you can try some target training through the cage bars and just dropping the reward into a treat cup rather than asking him to take it from you. Once he can target reliably to any location within the cage, then you can work on target training through the open cage door, around the outside of the cage and eventually away from the cage.

Please do give him space though if he's not feeling comfortable with you around.

 

Sparkles99

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While this experience wasn't with birds, may I suggest opening the cage in a bird proof room, & sitting in the middle of the floor reading or some such thing?

Sometimes it helps if creatures explore you on their own terms, rather than yours, first. It can take a long time, but they will get curious & come check you out. When they do, you ignore them & continue reading. The goal is to make you not-so-scary. Eventually, you can verbally acknowledge him (still not looking at him).

When you want him back in his cage, stick a succulent treat in it. When he's eating it (but not immediately) calmly & slowly (without looking at him!), close the cage door 'till the next time.

Disclaimer: I've done this with other animals, not birds, but think it could work. Eventually, they were comfortable with hands.
 

RileyShy

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You have my sympathy for the screaming! It's probably a self soothing behavior that's become a routine bad habit. Hm... It's difficult to give advice without meeting a frightened parrot in person, since every one of them will have their own problems and own triggers for their behavior.

I would say that the first step in earning a bird's trust for me has always giving them control of their environment. The easiest way to do this is to establish a safe space, and let him set the terms on where or when he will interact with you outside of it.

For my birds, their cage is their safe space. If they want to be left alone, then they know that they can go back in their cage at anytime and will be left alone. They have the right to refuse to step up if they're inside of their cage, and the right to refuse interaction. It's their way of telling me, 'I need some alone time!'. Especially for a frightened bird, you'll want to give them a place where they know they can be left alone and be unbothered.

Anything that you do without a birds consent will ultimately work against you. You can try following Shrek's story for some ideas- that may help!

Tips on working with a rescued IRN
 

Lady Jane

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The toe holding, towel grabbing and chasing to go back in to the cage probably didn't give your IRN a save feeling with hands. That's probably why he hates hands at this moment.

Y
This is so true, not the way to handle a companion bird. Mabye a Rafter bird.
 
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