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Hahns Macaw x Sun Conure Hybrid Wednesday Macawnure

flyzipper

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I had always thought of things like that as different colorations
In most discussions on the topic of avian "hybrids", it tends to focus on shared or differing genetics.

Colour can be misleading -- caiques, for example, look like simple colour variations, but they're actually 4 separate species.
 

Mizzely

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Ah, so like with cockatiels - grey, cinnamon, lutino, etc?

I had always thought of things like that as different colorations, not so much as I guess breeding a “mixed breed” (using dog terminology).
Well, dog breeds are over hundreds or thousands of years... Their color, coat, temperament, etc, all taken into account.

Many bird species have been in captivity and bred with any purpose less than a hundred years. Some may only be a few generations away from the wild.

So take a wolf, the dog's ancestor. If you breed out different color mutations, like black, white, brown, grey, you have the same thing we are doing with cockatiels and conures. It's mostly surface level changes that can be done within a generation or two.

To breed so that you know your litter will be full of fierce, loyal hunters, or domestic wolves you can trust around your kids or sheep, that's going to take a lot longer.

We took wolves and made them into beings to fit our unique ways of life, styles of fighting or hunting.

For parrots we are still stuck on color. We haven't bred for traits yet. And it will take decades or centuries to do that.
 

~Drini~

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Green-cheeked conures and their different colour mutations perhaps (cinnamon, pineapple, turquoise, yellow-sided, erc)?

That would apply to one definition of hybrid, varieties, but within the same species.
I think budgies would be a better example. I think you can say that there are 2 breeds of budgies: American and English. Same species but each have their own set of phenotypic differences and color mutations, although I don't know if I would consider "American" as much a breed as I would call it just any non-English budgie. English budgies are more selectively bred (and have more health issues).
 

~Drini~

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Oh. Jeez, I’m terrible at this :roflmao:

Ok, what would be an example of same species but differing… I don’t know, whatever would make it a hybrid?
I think the definition of 'hybrid' for animals requires it to be between two different species -- anything else is just a mix.
 

AussieBird

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I think budgies would be a better example. I think you can say that there are 2 breeds of budgies: American and English. Same species but each have their own set of phenotypic differences and color mutations, although I don't know if I would consider "American" as much a breed as I would call it just any non-English budgie. English budgies are more selectively bred (and have more health issues).
I almost mentioned budgies, there is actually three "breeds".
Some one correct me if I am wrong but I thought canaries were one of the few birds with breeds?
 

Karearea

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Personally I would not call them breeds. The term "breed" is used for varieties of domesticated animals, which budgies are not. They are far too genetically similar to their wild relatives, even including english, hagoromo, crested, and any other varieties out there - domestication takes thousands of years, and parrots have only been bred in captivity for a little over a century. There ARE breeds of chickens, canaries, ducks, pigeons, and geese, though.

Just realized Mizzely made a post about this above mine. Oh well haha
 
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