• Welcome to Avian Avenue! To view our forum with less advertisments please register with us.
    Memberships are free and it will just take a moment. Click here

green cheek conure displays of aggression?

Cheekyboy

Checking out the neighborhood
Joined
6/29/22
Messages
1
Real Name
Des
Hello all,

I have a 1 1/2 year old male green cheek conure that I believe is showing signs of hormonal aggression towards one specific member of my household as well as outside visitors. When we first got him he was good with everyone for the most part, up until several months ago when what seemed like a flip switched in his brain, as he decided he needed to bite (he will draw blood), lunge, and become overall aggressive towards my mom (who we live with) and guests. I’m having my mom try to build her bond with him thru the use of treats with is currently going okay, but I don’t know if it’ll have a lasting effect. We’re going to our vet today so I will bring up the issue to him to confirm if it is in fact hormonal, as he does present various amorous displays towards me, which also has me thinking he sees me as a mate. he’s a good boy overall and has become my little pal, but I really need to nip this unwanted behavior in the butt, as rehoming him is not an option for me. If anyone has any helpful advice it would be greatly appreciated, as cheeky is my first bird and I’m still learning what/what not to do in terms of helping this behavior.

thanks in advance!
 

expressmailtome

Ripping up the road
Administrator
Avenue Veteran
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
4/15/10
Messages
48,433
Real Name
Matthew

Pixiebeak

Rollerblading along the road
Celebirdy of the Month
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
6/18/22
Messages
3,182
Location
Florida
Real Name
Laura
Babies are different than adults. When they become adults they express themselves and make individual choices.

While hormones are a thing, they aren't the end all answer to every behavior or bite.

Parrots are flock creatures. Flocks are stable and guests are kinda viewed as invading raiders.

While I will share how I helped mine be polite to guests , and hopefully help you. Guests aren't given the same privileges as parrots share with us. Unless the parrot chooses to extend that trust. And guests don't know how to read parrots as well and can give mixed signals.

I'm sure you have worked to earn your parrots trust. And you can carefully guide that to guests. There are probably different ways. But what I have done is to have a guest come and say hello to my parrots in the cage and hand a treat. Some parrots are cage protective if yours is , or needs to get used to guests handing treats, then have a small treat only dish in the cage that they place it in. For some guests that's all I trust them with. But I have all guests do this.

For guests I trust. It took a little practice and training in the beginning. I get my parrot out, and take a miniut to make sure they are calm and happy. Then I ask my parrot to step from me to the guests hand or arm. Then immediately back to me . I gave them a treat and told them how great they were. The most I repeat this is 3 times. Parrots do best with very short repetitive training and breaks. Its also fluid situation reading them, the situation, and the guest, and the individual parrots. I have 4 and they each advanced at their own pace.

The next step can be after you hang out and chat with your guest a few minutes, or it can be after several days and different guests just doing the first step enough times thst your parrot understands and trusts. Starts the same tho, I get my parrot out and calm and have them step from me to guest . I let them stay on the guest while I gave a treat then back to me for treat with lots of praise.

Then I moved to step from me to them they give the treat say hello then back to me for treat. I slowly extended the time I let my parrot stand on their hand or arm. A few minutes of being adored then back to me. That's the most I expect of my parrots. They aren't dogs.

But for special people that my parrots like. We might visit and pass the bird back and forth or my burd might choose to hang out on them. For extra special people my parrot might ask for a cuddle or head scratches. This is usually house guests that are staying a few days with me and the birds have gotten a chance to feel comfortable with them. But I have times my parrots are smitten with someone right off. But its their choice. Not every person gets petting privileges , my parrots decide that , some people are never extended that privilege by my parrots.

This system has worked for 3 quakers and one green cheek conure.

These same steps should also work with your mom.
 

Pixiebeak

Rollerblading along the road
Celebirdy of the Month
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
6/18/22
Messages
3,182
Location
Florida
Real Name
Laura
One of the sticky threads in behavior
 

flyzipper

Rollerblading along the road
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
9/28/20
Messages
2,239
Location
Canada
Real Name
Steve
Welcome to the forum!
he does present various amorous displays towards me, which also has me thinking he sees me as a mate
Regarding that, have a look at this and see if it resonates with what you're seeing...

If there is an inappropriate pair-bond at play, then I'd suggest the primary work would be yours -- creating something more appropriate between you two.

It sounds like your strategy for your Mom's relationship is a good one (perhaps paired with the above), and that's important because she lives under the same roof.

Regarding your guests, that approach depends on how often you have guests and how important it is for your conure to get along with them.

My birds don't get much socialization with outsiders, so I have no expectations they'll do well with visitors (not advocating this strategy, just noting I don't have much to share for that dynamic). For my conure, she will fly to somebody on her own if she knows them well enough, but will otherwise keep her distance (which is telling me she has no interest in getting closer, so I don't attempt to facilitate it). My Severe is aggressive toward outsiders, so he gets separated for everyone's safety. My Military tends to fly to the perch closest to the strange person and just watch, so that works for everyone. When all else fails, or if there's any doubt in my mind about the way a visitor or my birds will react to a close encounter, separation keeps everyone safe.
 
Top