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What Pionus parrot should I choose?

sunnysmom

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Hmm okay. So the rumor that Pionus parrots generally is a quiet, easy-going and not that demanding birds is not actually true?

For now I’m getting the feeling that people warning me or recommending me not to buy these parrots and that its not that easy as the rumor has it.
This section that Mizzely posted will give you a good idea of what a Pi is like from people who have them. :)

I consider a Pi an "easier" bird. But I have a cockatoo.... so it's all relative. :)
 

Mizzely

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Everything is generally "by comparison" and "relative". If you ask 10 people you're likely to get 5 to 10 different answers.

By comparison to cockatoos, they are more easy going and quieter.

An example: My experience with quakers is that they are loud, intelligent, stubborn jerks, and I'll never have another. Other people find them to be sweet as honey and would never want to be without them.

What's quiet to one is not to another. I consider my Jardine's quiet but that's because he tends to whistle and beep instead of scream. To someone else, all the whistles and beeps may be loud and intolerable.

Budgies are quiet but a lot of people can't handle the constant chatter.

Macaws are loud but a lot of owners say they aren't frequently loud.
 

Hirro8

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Okay, thanks for all this great information. Is there some good reasons to buy a Pionus parrot over other parrots on the same size?
 

zoo mom

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I have a BH Pionus, a Senegal, 2 cockatiels, a Hahns Macaw and a Rose Breasted (Galah) cockatoo.

Each of these have their Pros and Cons.

My Pionus Andre is the most even tempered. He loves to "shake hands". He is a delightful bird who prefers to be a companion rather than a cuddler. My Senegal Jason is a clown. My cockatiels Grahamy and Erica are basically hands off. They like to sit on me and observe what is going on but don't want hands touching them. My Hahns Macaw Giuseppe is the most consistent cuddler but will nip with little warning. Russell my Galah has the nickname Boogertoo. He is sweet and cuddly and will do almost anything for a kiss, until he doesn't. His mood changes are quick and you have to keep a close watch on him because of this.

If I had room, time, and money and could get more birds; I would get more Pionus more Hahns. I wouldn't mind more cockatiels, Senegals, or a flock of budgies. I would not get another Galah. One of them is enough.

I don't think any of us are trying to talk you out of a Pionus. All of the Pionus parronts on here love our Pionus dearly. What we are trying to do is give you an honest opinion, so you do not get blindsided because your Pionus isn't what everyone says they are.
 

Hirro8

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Thanks for all the help from you guys! I hope other that read this in the future makes good research before buying a bird straight away!

Thanks again!
 

jh81

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Choose them all!

ive interacted with mackaws, cockatoos, and i had a grey, senegals and an amazon...
i say, get any Pi you can get your hands on!

SSSSAAAVVVEEEEE TRHHEEEEMMMM AAALLLLLL!!!

Well.. maybe im not the most qualified person to talk to in this regard ;-)
 

Elysian

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The more you try to put a species into a box, the more you will find yourself frustrated or disappointed.

To try to narrow down the personality and quirks of an entire species is really like trying to pick a random wolf who is going to be most like a golden retriever.
Not to hijack the thread, but I love this explanation for myself.
I feel like every time I post about what bird I might want (not just here, any bird group) there are two common responses and they feel like polar opposites to me.

If I talk about multiple species I'm looking at its
1. "Oh you have too many species you are interested in, do more research and pick one"

But if I talk about one in particular then its
2. "Oh you cannot generalize the species at all, there are absolutely no guarantees. My ___ acts more like a ___"

I love everyone here, you're great bird advocates, and I know sooo many people get a parrot without any kind of knowledge or prep.

But I can't/won't pick one species to focus on and your post is such a good explanation of why :)
 

tka

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I think there are very broad trends. Caiques tend to be high energy and bolshy compared to other birds. Greys tend to be smart and sensitive. Parrotlets tend to think they are much bigger than they are and have the attitude to match! I think there's more variability in other species - macaws, amazons, quakers, conures and yes, pionus seem to be less predictable. I think if someone is genuinely all over the place and wants everything from a parrotlet to a macaw, then that can show that they've not really thought about what they can offer a bird. Most of us do have limitations in terms of space and money - for example, I can't give a macaw the space or amount of wood to chew that it needs.

Ultimately, everyone who brings a parrot home with them has to ask themself whether they will still love and care for the parrot if they were loud, a feather-plucker, or chose someone else as their favourite. Would you still love this bird if it was the exact opposite of what you were hoping for?
 

Hirro8

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Thank you so much for helping me out! You really make me think of parrots in another way and I’m glad I have done this much research and asking for help from people who owns medium sized parrots!

Just another question. So the first couple of months after the chicks have been hatched is the time where they are most easy to shape into a “better” bird? And then the fewest of the breeders actually trying to prevent bad habits later?

Anyways, I have an idea/plan to how my “parrot project” should look like (of course not knowing if it going to be a success), but I’m dedicated to try to make it work.

Step1: I’ve already bought the “ Parrot Wizards Guide to Well-Behaved Parrots” -book and going to read it before doing any more steps. My project may end here if I find out that parrots is way, way to hard for me.

Step 2: I’ve already talked a bit to a breeder and he tells me that he’s not hand feeding the chicks, but let’s the parents do it, which make them remember to be a bird and don’t getting a too close bond to humans at a early age. This will probably make the taming a bit more work, but I’m dedicated.
I’m also planning to buy two birds from the same clutch. I’m thinking it will make them more safe and if their left alone during the day two birds will always have company in their self.

Step 3: I’m planning on making a bird room for them where they can play, fly and have some training. At the same time have a little playcenter in the living room where they can be with us, interact and socialize.

Step 4: Make the cages a fun place to be, with lots of toys and things to chew trough. At the same time have the lights on a timer which makes a more realistic day and night cycle for them.

Step 5: Eventually make them tame enough to have them outside in a harness. Maybe after a while make a outdoor aviary.

I will need to read up on nutrition and diet for the birds, but as I said, I’m dedicated to house two bird and try to make a home that they will love.

If my understanding parrots is not a pet you can go 60% into and have a great experience and a great bird. Im thinking that the more effort and right things you do for the bird, the better well behaved bird you will get? (of course assuming one socializing and training the birds, stimulating them)

I’m thinking this approach will make the chance smaller regarding the birds developing bad habits such as screaming, feather plucking and aggression?

Is my plan worth going trough with or am I getting it all wrong? xD

-EJ
 

Elysian

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I think there are very broad trends. Caiques tend to be high energy and bolshy compared to other birds. Greys tend to be smart and sensitive. Parrotlets tend to think they are much bigger than they are and have the attitude to match! I think there's more variability in other species - macaws, amazons, quakers, conures and yes, pionus seem to be less predictable. I think if someone is genuinely all over the place and wants everything from a parrotlet to a macaw, then that can show that they've not really thought about what they can offer a bird. Most of us do have limitations in terms of space and money - for example, I can't give a macaw the space or amount of wood to chew that it needs.

Ultimately, everyone who brings a parrot home with them has to ask themself whether they will still love and care for the parrot if they were loud, a feather-plucker, or chose someone else as their favourite. Would you still love this bird if it was the exact opposite of what you were hoping for?
Ah maybe that's why I scared everyone when I first started checking out bird forums :D I did pretty much say I'd be happy with anything from a Quaker to a Macaw.
Well.. I believe I would, and I would do anything I needed to for it. But I think I just meant that I don't care what body the bird has if I happen to go to a rescue and get that mythical magical experience of being "chosen" by a bird.

Otherwise I know a Macaw would take a lot more rearranging, and that a little guy wouldn't be doing all the things I imagine doing with a bigger guy.
So as far as actively seeking out a baby, I'm focused in the size range from large conures to amazons.. but on the other hand.. if one of the bigger or smaller ones somehow finds and obviously claims ME, I'd just be head over heels thrilled about being "picked" and I would gladly make them (and the budgies) my world.
:swoon:

Maybe I'm crazy :( But I think I'm okay with that too?


Anyway! @Hirro8 - Everyone is right. You just have to be prepared for something that is not at all what you expected.
But reading all of the "help" threads here will definitely give you and idea of what could happen and suggestions of how to work through it if it does.
Are you sure you want two baby birds at once though?

I got two baby budgies at once. I love them to death but it is WORK to forge a bond with them. They love each other much much more than they love me and I think they could happily go completely untamed if I let them. As long as they had food they wouldn't even wonder where I was.
 
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zoo mom

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Your plan sounds good but just to let you know getting siblings does not necessarily mean that they will get along once they reach adulthood. If you want them to be more easily trained get one and then get the second in 3-6 months. If you prefer to get them at the same time. Make sure you have 2 cages so that they can be separated if there is a problem.
 

Christy Cat

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I'd highly recommend finding a local rescue and volunteering your time. Which unfortunately with Covid is not easy to do right now. I think it will help you to understand what parrots are really like, the amount of work that goes into them and the differences in personality. It may also help you find a parrot with the right personality for your family.
 

cm16600

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Hi Hirro8 ,
I live in Sweden too and will be Picking up my Pionus from a breder in 2 weeks.Was your contact in Laholm?
 

Hirro8

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Yes! @cm16600 Im from the Nothern part of Norway so I have to drive for some days to get to Laholm and back.
 

Hirro8

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It's either a Blue Head or a Bronze Winged
 
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