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Preparing to Adopt an Older Grey, Need Advice on Making the Transition Easy

papaya13

Strolling the yard
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I recently made the decision to switch from buying a baby to adopting a 22YO CAG from a retired couple in my area. According to them, he's the 'sweetest bird they've ever met' and has no behavioral issues whatsoever... but my family has purchased a lot of ranch horses, and all of them are 'the sweetest horse I've ever met, even a kid could ride him'- until you get them home and realize they crow-hop and buck at every strange looking rock they see :meh:

Anyways, regardless of whether or not he's as easy-going as they say, I want to make the transition as smooth as possible for him. I've already asked about his favorite treats and toys, but is there anything else I can do to make moving less stressful?
 

Xoetix

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I brought home a nearly 16 year old cockatoo from an older couple, and really I don't think anything beyond what you're probably already planning - toys, treats, food, etc - will do much more than you'll already be doing. Just patience, and waiting to see the full personality show through :)

Maybe asking what his schedule is already? Is there a set wake up and bedtime routine? Or maybe songs he likes to hear or sing? And whether or not you need to keep him away from an Amazon Alexa so he doesn't order himself goodies :roflmao: CAGs are wild, those videos absolutely amaze me.
 

papaya13

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Maybe asking what his schedule is already? Is there a set wake up and bedtime routine? Or maybe songs he likes to hear or sing? And whether or not you need to keep him away from an Amazon Alexa so he doesn't order himself goodies :roflmao: CAGs are wild, those videos absolutely amaze me.
LOL I'm semi-seriously thinking about getting a Dot with parental controls so he can choose his own music... Is that crazy? Crazier than normal, I mean :p
 

Pixiebeak

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Pamela Clark is an excellent resource, and she has a fondness for CAG.

This is one to get started then you can search on your own.

I will add talk to him , always explain stuff, be predictable, create some routines. Read body language. Don't be surprised , if he responds a first by being a lump on a stick, he is watching, he reading you, he is thinking and deciding. Or they can act out and test , test , test you. Or they can be thrilled and just like they have always been with you. Adapt. Don't be nervous, birds read us if we are nervous they worry why. Treat set backs with humor.

 

Toy

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Adding to the above posts......CAG's tend to be on the defensive. I'd suggest take a slow walk thru your house & explain everything to him as you go. This is the frig, chair, table, tub ,etc. Does he step up from inside his cage or must he be outside it, use a perch to step up, etc. Also CAG's don't always give a sign they will bite & they can strike lightening fast. CAG's also do not like change, so he may need lots of time to adapt. Is his current cage in front of a window or against a wall. They are super smart & often require you ask them to do things, & explain why/what/how you want them to do things. Our CAG is food motivated, which does help. She recently learned to remove toys, toy parts, etc., from her dishes before we feed & change water. She watch my B&G Macaw stick toys in her dishes & I taught her to remove them. Jengo (CAG) learned just from watching & me asking her to.
 

papaya13

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Pamela Clark is an excellent resource, and she has a fondness for CAG.

This is one to get started then you can search on your own.

I will add talk to him , always explain stuff, be predictable, create some routines. Read body language. Don't be surprised , if he responds a first by being a lump on a stick, he is watching, he reading you, he is thinking and deciding. Or they can act out and test , test , test you. Or they can be thrilled and just like they have always been with you. Adapt. Don't be nervous, birds read us if we are nervous they worry why. Treat set backs with humor.

Thank you for your advice, and ESPECIALLY for introducing me to Pamela Clark! I don’t know how she could have escaped my research until now, but WOW is she a treasure-trove of research-backed and evidence-based parrot advice. I just downloaded a 2hr YouTube video of a virtual presentation she made for Phoenix Landing and listened to it on my walk- I appreciate how she’s not afraid to ruffle some feathers! ;)

I’ve been doing my best to incorporate scientific sources as I prepare for my bird; as Pamela mentions in her talk, much of the advice that gets repeated over and over is 10-20 years old at least! Resources based on actual observation of wild populations’ behavior, diet, and body language are shockingly rare. Though I really shouldn’t be shocked, considering the backward state of human nutritional advice and rampant psychological misconceptions…
 

Pixiebeak

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Thank you for your advice, and ESPECIALLY for introducing me to Pamela Clark! I don’t know how she could have escaped my research until now, but WOW is she a treasure-trove of research-backed and evidence-based parrot advice. I just downloaded a 2hr YouTube video of a virtual presentation she made for Phoenix Landing and listened to it on my walk- I appreciate how she’s not afraid to ruffle some feathers! ;)

I’ve been doing my best to incorporate scientific sources as I prepare for my bird; as Pamela mentions in her talk, much of the advice that gets repeated over and over is 10-20 years old at least! Resources based on actual observation of wild populations’ behavior, diet, and body language are shockingly rare. Though I really shouldn’t be shocked, considering the backward state of human nutritional advice and rampant psychological misconceptions…
I'm in agreement, not near enough studies in wild parrot's in their natural environment, but to be fair it's challenging..

Looking forward to your new guy and your adventures
 
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