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Mating budgies

FeatheredM

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I caught my budgies mating today, but more seriously than before. I've seen them do it before, but they weren't really able to do it correctly. The problem is that if they lay eggs I would like them to hatch, and hand raise them. But I would rather avoid eggs being layed. If I want the egg to hatch do I need to put a nesting box now, or can I wait till my birdie actually lays eggs and place them in there. I'm nervous about putting a nesting box in there because I want to discourage nesting behavior, but they are already are mating! I'm honestly very confused on what to do!
 

Zara

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If you won´t remove eggs, then you should not have a male and a female together until you know how to raise young.

Not all mating leads to eggs. No nestbox. Just split your birds up. I personally don´t like splitting up pairs, but that´s why I use dummy eggs.
 

barbs0nly

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unless you know 100% how to take care of the young, hand raise them if the parents reject them (SUPER DIFFICULT and complex) and correct any issues early on and have an avian vet who’s willing to come at every beckon and call id boil them and put them back in the nest and wait for her to get bored of roosting. breeder quality birds and pet quality birds are way different too we don’t know the genetics of our pets and having them breed can change how they behave DRASTICALLY laying and raising is difficult for the hen, we have plenty of people who have chicks from accidental pairs. part of being a responsible parront is handling their hormones and reproductive behaviors. i bet you’ll figure out what’s best for you and the birds good luck :p !!
 

FeatheredM

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I've done lots of research on how to raise young, I'm also always home. I'd just like to prevent it because of my fears of something going wrong and I want what's best for my pair, but if they do let eggs I would love to hand raise them. I'm always at home so yeah. But if I want layed eggs to hatch would I have to insert a nesting box? Or could I move the eggs into the nesting box once they hatch?
 

FeatheredM

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Wait, I said the last sentence wrong!! I meant: or could I move the eggs into the nesting box once layed? Or insert a nesting box now?
 

Shezbug

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Only done lots of research? Do you honestly think you’re being reasonable and responsible??

Research alone will never be good enough to ensure the safety, health and survival rate of these innocent birds.

Imagine you’re a baby or deathly sick, immobile and incapable of communicating your seriously high and specialised life needs or of providing these things for yourself… Do you honestly think that you’d be comfortable or even smart to be putting your life in the hands of someone who had only researched how to help you? This is essentially what you’re planning to do- play around with the life/lives of another living being simply for your own curiosity, learning or entertainment.
I do not wish to sound horrible or rude but the reality is that everything you’ve said here as far as I’m concerned shows a serious lack of knowledge, understanding, maturity, responsibility and logic.
Bringing and being responsible for life is not a game or experiment and it certainly shouldn’t be done for a learning experience without the correct support, experience, supervisor/mentor and equipment. Who is going to mentor you, support, guide and teach you before you play around with life??
 
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AussieBird

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Others have already given sound advice.
If you wish to prevent things going further, completely rearrange cage, perches, toys, and food bowls need to be moved. Maybe even move their entire cage somewhere else for a little ‘holiday’.
 

FeatheredM

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I don't get it, how am I supposed to raise baby budgies for the first time if I shouldn't do it because I never did it before :) Any one who has raised young budgies has had to have a first time, and the best thing to do is heavy research and ask for help (which is what I'm doing). I don't mind you telling me why I shouldn't do it, but why not do it more respectful way? Talking to me like I'm a horrible, careless animal abusive is not that respectful. There are better ways to tell me why I shouldn't breed for one time. Thank you @AussieBird for telling me a way to help prevent mating
 

Sparkles99

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Mentors provide hands on help. Research is excellent, but will never make up for being shown. Take it from me; I once did extensive research on how to trim a hedge. Ask me how that went. I will never live down the shame. :arghh:

I expect many first time budgie breeders believe preventable losses are acceptable; I don't. They're little lives. People don't mean to be harsh, but the emergency forum is filled with people desperately seeking help for this & all manner of other emergencies. They're trying to spare you & your birds.
 

Sodapop&Co.

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I don't get it, how am I supposed to raise baby budgies for the first time if I shouldn't do it because I never did it before
The first time you do it you do it with mentorship; someone experienced teaches you first hand on older babies at first, for example. I'm very familiar with that attitude :o: and I can tell you it got me into trouble and regret over time (and left a barely-teenager with an untrained horse cuz if I shouldn't train cuz I've never trained before how am I ever gonna learn... yeah. Not good). You gotta accept that that thought process is fooling yourself; be honest with yourself. Then in a couple of years when you're an adult and know someone who can mentor you, then you can think about it. I think Shezbug put it very kindly, all things considered. No one here is trying to hurt your feelings; just to be honest. I think that fact probably should show you how serious this is.
 

Zara

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I'll wait then until after I get mentored, thanks everyone
....and in the meantime? What?
What happens if you find eggs in a few days? I´m curious to know what you would do? Say, oh well I got eggs, better let them hatch, or remove those eggs and wait until you have someone knowlegable suporting you?

Ultimatelty, having a male and a female housed together means at one point or another you WILL HAVE NO CHOICE BUT TO REMOVE SOME EGGS. It is INEVITABLE. Some birds will lay back to back, even with our best efforts to prevent it. Any breeder worth their weight would remove some clutches to give the hen a resting period.
Allowing every single egg to run it´s course and potentially hatch IMO is unethical.

Trying to prevent mating, is another thing I´m quite against. Mating is good, it´s a release of tension and frustration. It´s good for their wellbeing.
Trying to prevent laying by rearranging the cage etc is ok, but eventually you WILL get eggs.
Splitting a pair that are bonded will lead to two very sexually frustrated, sad, mourning birds.

With all of this said. It is important to have the adults have a check up before breeding, so I hope your birds have been to the vet recently.

You will also need to buy all of these things;
(You will use every item on this list, except maybe the papaya)

-Hand rearing formula
-Feeding utensil - I use syringes but always recommend feeding spoons to a novice, you might have to buy these online.
-Candy thermometer to check formula temperature + a spare
-brooder
-heating pad if your brooder is not a professional one
-Aspen shavings - Course pine is ok if you can´t get aspen. Never fine pine, and never ever cedar.
-Thermometer (digital) for monitoring brooder temperature
-Hygrometer for monitoring humidity inside the brooder
-Weighing scales - you can use a gram scale, or as your birds are budgies, a 0.01 scale
-Pedialyte, or natural unflavoured coconut water
-Papaya
-Nursery cage with plenty of perches (to move the birds into after they fledge)
-Clean hand towels
-Q-tips (cotton buds)
-Pots to make the formula in, and create a Bain Marie

You could also look at getting liquid supplements (should the adults needs them), discuss this with your vet.

You will also need a disinfectant on hand to sterilize your tools.

You will also need a means of an emergency vet visit. If there´s a problem with one of the chicks or the hen, you will need to get to the vet very quickly. Having a vet within an hour of you and your own transport is ideal.
 

Zara

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@FeatheredM i recommend you find and read (if you haven’t already) Phoenix’s handraising thread, @Britnicorn and Phoenix went though an awful lot and Britney recorded it all wonderfully
Be sure to ask her about her nights. Waking up every few hours to do handfeeding. Don´t forget to ask her about all of her vet visits too.
Keep in mind that Britney didn´t plan for that chick, she took him on when she saw they weren´t being looked after, and she dropped everything to take care of that little bird.
 

FeatheredM

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Is it ok if I let the eggs hatch if I ask for help from here and constantly ask before doing if I have any doubts on anything? They are trying to mate alot, and I think it's pretty probable that they will lay eggs soon. I want what's best for the chicks and the parents. I am able to get and supply all that @Zara listed, but since she listed it , deos that mean that it is not wrong to breed for the first time if I care for them as best as I can? Will the best I can give be good enough for the birds and chicks, is pretty much my question here. I also need to know if I will be able to leave the house, because I can't, then I'll need to let my family know.
 
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Zara

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deos that mean that it is not wrong to breed for the first time if I care for them as best as I can? Will the best I can give be good enough for the birds and chicks, is pretty much my question here.
Personally, I think if you are not an independent person, then no. You need to be able to rely on yourself and not on anyone else (other than the vet, obviously), you can be up all night, do as you please, drive to the vet when needed, pay for whatever when needed, even if it´s 500+, buy any equipment that breaks, and be able to interview and find good homes for the birds on your own.
If you need to answer to someone, then it is not a good fit. Asking permission from someone else, or asking a friend for a ride to the vet is no good.
You need to be able to make a decision in the moment, and just do it.

This is just the start. On top of this, a mentor truly is ideal. But alongside that, plenty of research, plus a hand feeding course from someone experienced.

Worth noting, to check local market. No point breeding birds if the market is saturated.

There´s no reason you can´t study hard and then breed birds in a few years when you are more independent.
 

FeatheredM

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I live with a family, and they would understand if I cannot be with them when taking care of the chicks :D there are no breeders around me, and I have a vet who is an hour away. I honestly think I'm going to do it. I WILL be asking a million questions on here and somewhere else, and I will be thinking of everything further today and make my my final decision. So I could really use more insight to help me make a good decision, I'm also leaning towards not doing it just because Im scared of anything going wrong. This is a REALLY hard decision
 

Zara

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You never responded to this;

Ultimatelty, having a male and a female housed together means at one point or another you WILL HAVE NO CHOICE BUT TO REMOVE SOME EGGS. It is INEVITABLE. Some birds will lay back to back, even with our best efforts to prevent it. Any breeder worth their weight would remove some clutches to give the hen a resting period.
What is your plan for all future eggs?
 

FeatheredM

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I've made a final decision, I'm not going to do it. As much as I want to do it, I know that right now is not the time. Right now the responsibille choice is no, maybe I'll do it in the future. If they lay eggs I'm not going to let them hatch as much as it hurts me, I know it's the better decision.
 

Zara

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If they lay eggs I'm not going to let them hatch
Given your birds are budgies, they should be fine to just remove. Keep the egg safe somewhere at first, just incase your birds start looking for it frantically (though not likely). If they do, boil the egg, let it cool down, then put it back where you found it. No nest box.
Monitor your hen, be sure she rests well, eats well and doesn´t show any abnormal signs.
 
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