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Getting my Cockatiel To Eat Chop

Codyyjohns

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Cody
Hi everyone,

My cockatiel Petey is 7 years old. I’ve decided to change his diet up, as for most of his life he has only agreed to eat Roudybush mixed with some Nutriberries.

I’ve decided to add Dr. Harvey’s colossal cockatiel mix for seed and grain intake and also am preparing fresh chop.

from experience I’m assuming it’s definitely going to take some time and not happen day one.

any tips on how to make the process go smoother than anticipated?
 

Mizzely

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Winn

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I have budgies, not a tiel, but I started my birds' transition by mixing a little chop in with the seed/pellet blend they were fed before I got them (light feedings a few times a day). They took to the chop quickly and would eat it without the seeds/pellets added within a week. Apparently some birds absolutely refuse to eat chop, so I don't know if this might work for you.
 

lobster14

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My tiel is much younger, just a bit over 5 months old, but it feels nearly impossible to get him to eat chop. He currently eats a mix that is 2/3 pellets and 1/3 a seed/grain mix. He'll pick at some green veggies here and there, but is extremely picky. I had the most luck offering a large piece and he picks it apart. I've tried chop, and micro-chop (tiny pieces via a good processor), and he won't go for it at all. Tried sprinkling it on his food as well and no go, he hunger striked or would just avoid them. God forbid I offer him fruit, he acts like I'm trying to poison him. Ironically, he'll eat various grains with fervor. Oats, unsalted crackers, rice cereal, cooked rice, popcorn, etc.

If your Tiel is already mostly eating pellets (Roudybush), he's probably fine to just continue. I would just experiment with offering new veggies/fruits every day and see what sticks. Make sure to try different presentations as well! (Large pieces, chop, microchop, special bowl, mixed with food, etc).

Here's a list of the veggies my picky guy has liked the most so far:
- Kale
- Brocolli
- Bok Choy
- Spinach
(We've tried a LOT more but those are the only ones he'll pick at so far!)
 

Shezbug

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My tiel is much younger, just a bit over 5 months old, but it feels nearly impossible to get him to eat chop. He currently eats a mix that is 2/3 pellets and 1/3 a seed/grain mix. He'll pick at some green veggies here and there, but is extremely picky. I had the most luck offering a large piece and he picks it apart. I've tried chop, and micro-chop (tiny pieces via a good processor), and he won't go for it at all. Tried sprinkling it on his food as well and no go, he hunger striked or would just avoid them. God forbid I offer him fruit, he acts like I'm trying to poison him. Ironically, he'll eat various grains with fervor. Oats, unsalted crackers, rice cereal, cooked rice, popcorn, etc.

If your Tiel is already mostly eating pellets (Roudybush), he's probably fine to just continue. I would just experiment with offering new veggies/fruits every day and see what sticks. Make sure to try different presentations as well! (Large pieces, chop, microchop, special bowl, mixed with food, etc).

Here's a list of the veggies my picky guy has liked the most so far:
- Kale
- Brocolli
- Bok Choy
- Spinach
(We've tried a LOT more but those are the only ones he'll pick at so far!)
Tiels generally aren’t keen on fruit, they’re much more inclined to eat veggies.
Many have great success with hanging a whole wet leaf of greens or larger chunk of other veg rather than offering chop.
 
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