• Welcome to Avian Avenue! To view our forum with less advertisments please register with us.
    Memberships are free and it will just take a moment. Click here

Dilute blue fischer ideal pairing?

Greylady1966

Rollerblading along the road
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
3/6/19
Messages
1,720
Location
midwest
Real Name
Carol
@Gigibirds I've read some of your post and it seems like you've hand raised and fed many lovebirds. I always thought hybrids had a small to zero chance of breeding. What's your thoughts. I know nothing about breeding.
 

Greylady1966

Rollerblading along the road
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
3/6/19
Messages
1,720
Location
midwest
Real Name
Carol
To be clear I'm against hybrids.
 

Zara

Try to be a rainbow in somebody else´s cloud ❤️
Super Moderator
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Avenue Concierge
Joined
1/8/18
Messages
23,781
Location
Reino de España
And also they all are not older enough to breed! So no worries for now. They're 9 months old
Lovebirds can breed from 5/6 months old. It´s not ideal nor recommended, but they are physically able to. A similar thing to a 13 year old becoming a parent, she can (physically, her body can do it), but it´s not right. Young parents don´t usually make good parents.

I´m not sure I understand you intentions, now with talks of nest boxes. But ultimately, if you have any birds that are in pairs where they are different species or under the age of 1, then boil any eggs laid and then put them back where you found them. This will remove any possibility of ¨accidents¨.

I would not recommend breeding different species of lovebirds, but I do understand the desire to see the mutations that they would produce.
You can create a wide aray of colour mutations and factors within the same species. Hybridisation is not necessary unless you are trying to bring one mutation over from one species to another (transmutation), and ultimately you would need a pure specimen to breed the new mutation back into the other species.
 

Greylady1966

Rollerblading along the road
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
3/6/19
Messages
1,720
Location
midwest
Real Name
Carol
Thank you for answering Zara. Is it true they have health problems?
 

Destiny

Rollerblading along the road
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
6/6/20
Messages
1,571
Real Name
Destiny
I don't know specifically regarding lovebird hybrids, but speaking in general, the fertility of hybrids varies greatly, depending on the species involved. For some combinations, all hybrid offspring are sterile or nearly sterile, so the possibility of a second generation of hybrid offspring is unlikely or impossible. For other hybrids, their fertility is not affected or minimally affected, so it is quite possible for the hybrid to produce viable hybrid offspring.

Mules are an example of a sterile hybrid, produced by breeding a horse with a donkey. This is likely due to the fact that horses have 32 pairs of chromosomes and donkeys have 31 pairs of chromosomes. Mules end up with 63 chromosomes (31 & 1/2 pairs) and that extra mismatched chromosome interferes with viable reproduction. This is not the only issue. There are also other differences between horse and donkey genetics which produces reproductive problems. Even though they are relatively similar, they are still different species and these differences can cause serious issues that lead to fetal death. This is actually one of the reasons why hybrids themselves are usually uncommon. Many times, even if two different species breed, the hybrid offspring dies before being born. The hybrids that actually make it are the exceptions. Interestingly, even in mules, there are a few rare cases of viable offspring being produced. It is quite rare, but it does occasionally happen. In all cases, the mother was a mule and the father was either a horse or donkey. I couldn't find any examples of a mule stallion producing offspring or of two mules conceiving.

From what I've read regarding parrots, first generation macaw hybrids are usually able to conceive and have viable offspring. The likelihood of success is greater when one of the parents is not a hybrid. It is lower if both parents are hybrid. And fertility tends to go down with more crosses. So a second or third generation macaw hybrid is more likely to be sterile than a first generation hybrid. Most of the stuff I found was anecdotal, since hybrids have not been closely studied. And they are often the product of accidental or poorly-planned breeding, so record keeping might be a bit dodgy. I would guess that crossing closely related macaw species would be more likely to produce fertile hybrids and crossing more distantly related macaw species would produce more sterile or low-fertility offspring. But that is just a guess. I don't think anyone has tried to test that theory.

It also suggests that too much intentional hybridization could negatively impact macaw populations in aviculture due to increased genetic incompatibility and lower overall fertility. Probably not an issue in the immediate future, but something to think about for future generations of parrot owners.
 
Last edited:

Zara

Try to be a rainbow in somebody else´s cloud ❤️
Super Moderator
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Avenue Concierge
Joined
1/8/18
Messages
23,781
Location
Reino de España
Is it true they have health problems?
I don´t think there´s enough research done to know for sure.

I know you asked Gigibird the question about breeding and their thoughts, but I will answer this part for you,
I always thought hybrids had a small to zero chance of breeding.
If the Hybrid was a peach faced lovebird and a fischer´s lovebird, then the offspring would be sterile.
Hybrids within the eye-ring species (Personatus, Fischer´s. Lillians and Black cheeked lovebirds), which is what gigi has going on over there, can create fertile offspring. You can see in Gigibirds picture, the parent is a hybrid of Personatus and Fischeri. And was able to produce more hybrid offspring.

Going back to your question on problems, There are identity problems that can occur when you have a bird which is a hyrbid of Roseicollis (peach-faced) and ony other lovebird species. The rosy-faced, peach-faced, roseicollis lovebird is the only lovebird to carry nesting material on their backs, and observations show hybrid chicks struggling to learn to shred and tuck material into their rumps. As they do not know which species they are, they don´t know which way to do it.

I posted some info on lovebird hybrids a while back, just for reading , as I too am against creating them, but I find it interesting to learn;
 

Greylady1966

Rollerblading along the road
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
3/6/19
Messages
1,720
Location
midwest
Real Name
Carol
@Destiny thank you for the answer. I have always wondered when people buy from a pet store or a less than honest breeder if they are usually told the parrot is a hybrid.
 

Greylady1966

Rollerblading along the road
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
3/6/19
Messages
1,720
Location
midwest
Real Name
Carol
Thank you I learned something new today.
 

Gigibirds

Rollerblading along the road
Joined
2/15/21
Messages
1,023
I always thought hybrids had a small to zero chance of breeding. What's your thoughts. I know nothing about breeding.
Yes, I have hand raised many lovebirds, but they were all bought as babies, so I don't have much actual breeding experience! And yes, just like Zara said, some hybrids can breed, some can't. It depends on what kind of hybrid, but I also used to think that they pretty much couldn't breed at all.
 

Eesa

Meeting neighbors
Joined
5/30/21
Messages
27
Yes, I have hand raised many lovebirds, but they were all bought as babies, so I don't have much actual breeding experience! And yes, just like Zara said, some hybrids can breed, some can't. It depends on what kind of hybrid, but I also used to think that they pretty much couldn't breed at all.
Yes that's what most breeders here think.
I remember one Breeder Gave me a Hybrid for free (peach faced x Fischer) as he felt that he would not be able to Breed now.
 

Zara

Try to be a rainbow in somebody else´s cloud ❤️
Super Moderator
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Avenue Concierge
Joined
1/8/18
Messages
23,781
Location
Reino de España
I remember one Breeder Gave me a Hybrid for free (peach faced x Fischer) as he felt that he would not be able to Breed now.
That is very likely true.
Though I would still take precautions if I owned such hybrid, just incase!
 

Greylady1966

Rollerblading along the road
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
3/6/19
Messages
1,720
Location
midwest
Real Name
Carol
My niece wants to get a lovebird soon. This would be a good read for her. She's looking into adopting if possible. She has a friend that knows someone who breeds but he told her he breeds the 3 pairs all year because they produce the best baby's. That can't be healthy for them.
 

Zara

Try to be a rainbow in somebody else´s cloud ❤️
Super Moderator
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Avenue Concierge
Joined
1/8/18
Messages
23,781
Location
Reino de España
he breeds the 3 pairs all year because they produce the best baby's. That can't be healthy for them.
That depends how many clutches they produce. If only two then there´s no problem. If they are laying clutches every 2 or 3 months and raising all of those chicks, then they are milling those birds and it could kill them. Not something a professional would allow.

I wish your niece lots of success finding her lovebird :)
 
Top