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Why is this budgie greyish white?

Lovebird27

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Christian
Hey gang,
So, I came across these budgies and was intrigued by there colors. I would like to know what mutation influenced this greyish color. All I known it’s a Texas Clear Body. Does this happen to every blue TCB? Or do other factors come into play here?
What about the green bird, is it a TCB?
I believe they also may be opaline :thinking:
 

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Zara

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Birds can be any color (blue, grey, violet, green, etc) and Texas Clearbody

The grey budgie is not only a blue mutation, but also grey. Green birds can also be grey, but with a green base instead of blue.


I'm not all too familiar with the mutation but you can learn a bit more about it here

 

Pyropus

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When you read sites for genetics you are likely to find the tbc listed as sex linked clearbody. I will see if can look into it and explain how it works, basically this works from what I see as something thats based on sever genes being involved.

if you had biology in school you probably had about green and yellow peas, thats a simple example. But not all traits are like that, for instanse labs have two colors Black (dominant) and brown (recisive). But they also have a gene E and e, which simply said marks if the color will show or not, whenever you get a double ee the dog wont show color, regardless of whether its BB/Bb black or bb brown in color it will due to lacking the dominant E for show color apear yellow.

And so you can build on with genes to get traits.
So a black lab can be BBEE, BBEe, BbEE or BbEe
A brown can be bbEE or bbEe
While a yellow can be BBee, Bbee, bbee

The same would be with something like this, to find which genes are involved I would have to read a bit more to fully get oversight based on whats said on SL-clearbodies

Basically to figure out what offspring will be, will depend on which genotypes are behind the phenotype.

Phenotype is what you see like in labs, black, brown or yellow, genotype are the letters behind. And so obviously it depends on the genes involved and how they express.

Also its not so simple as dominant and recesive, you have other groups as well instead as like partial dominance and so on.
 

Pyropus

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Ok so continuing, with sex linked inheritance you either se the trait more often in one gender, or in some cases only see the trait in one gender, for mamalians this is the female, for birds its the male. Thats because birds are oposite of us, while with mamalians its the females that had an XX chromosome pair (males XY) with birds its the male thats XX.

Now since a Y chromosome has less space, there are some genes that the indvidual dont have a set off. So if you imagine the gene sits on the lower rigth leg, if you only have one then you only get one gene.

As far as I understand if the sources I read is rigth the clearbody is conected to the ino gene.
Ino comes in three variations which are denoted with a +, cl, or without notation

The + is most dominant, followed by cl, and then ino without a notation is most recesive. The ino gives ino, the cl gives clearbody, while the + gives normal color.

So in a female you need the ino cl, in males you need ino cl/cl or ino cl/

but from what I am reading it sounds like it may not be just a clearcut complete dominance, because it seems they see minor differences between the two male genotypes, so that indicates maybe that partial dominance may be involved too.

My head is geting tired for tonite though, and again whether the above is right depends on the sources I read is right in how they show and say they do and which results they see geno and phenotype wise.
 

Lovebird27

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Christian
Birds can be any color (blue, grey, violet, green, etc) and Texas Clearbody

The grey budgie is not only a blue mutation, but also grey. Green birds can also be grey, but with a green base instead of blue.


I'm not all too familiar with the mutation but you can learn a bit more about it here

Right. I believe grey and violet are visible because of a certain structure on the feather which makes it look grey or violet when combined with the proper base form. My question was whether this budgie has grey which I dont think so. So, what base color (blue or d blue) does this TCB have in order for it to be like this?
 

Lovebird27

Strolling the yard
Joined
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Messages
80
Real Name
Christian
Ok so continuing, with sex linked inheritance you either se the trait more often in one gender, or in some cases only see the trait in one gender, for mamalians this is the female, for birds its the male. Thats because birds are oposite of us, while with mamalians its the females that had an XX chromosome pair (males XY) with birds its the male thats XX.

Now since a Y chromosome has less space, there are some genes that the indvidual dont have a set off. So if you imagine the gene sits on the lower rigth leg, if you only have one then you only get one gene.

As far as I understand if the sources I read is rigth the clearbody is conected to the ino gene.
Ino comes in three variations which are denoted with a +, cl, or without notation

The + is most dominant, followed by cl, and then ino without a notation is most recesive. The ino gives ino, the cl gives clearbody, while the + gives normal color.

So in a female you need the ino cl, in males you need ino cl/cl or ino cl/

but from what I am reading it sounds like it may not be just a clearcut complete dominance, because it seems they see minor differences between the two male genotypes, so that indicates maybe that partial dominance may be involved too.

My head is geting tired for tonite though, and again whether the above is right depends on the sources I read is right in how they show and say they do and which results they see geno and phenotype wise.
Thanks, I appreciate the time you took to write this. I am conscious of its mode of inheritance. The only things that confuses me is whether or not this color has a dark factor in its base?( d blue or dd blue)
 

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Lovebird27

Strolling the yard
Joined
1/2/20
Messages
80
Real Name
Christian
When you read sites for genetics you are likely to find the tbc listed as sex linked clearbody. I will see if can look into it and explain how it works, basically this works from what I see as something thats based on sever genes being involved.

if you had biology in school you probably had about green and yellow peas, thats a simple example. But not all traits are like that, for instanse labs have two colors Black (dominant) and brown (recisive). But they also have a gene E and e, which simply said marks if the color will show or not, whenever you get a double ee the dog wont show color, regardless of whether its BB/Bb black or bb brown in color it will due to lacking the dominant E for show color apear yellow.

And so you can build on with genes to get traits.
So a black lab can be BBEE, BBEe, BbEE or BbEe
A brown can be bbEE or bbEe
While a yellow can be BBee, Bbee, bbee

The same would be with something like this, to find which genes are involved I would have to read a bit more to fully get oversight based on whats said on SL-clearbodies

Basically to figure out what offspring will be, will depend on which genotypes are behind the phenotype.

Phenotype is what you see like in labs, black, brown or yellow, genotype are the letters behind. And so obviously it depends on the genes involved and how they express.

Also its not so simple as dominant and recesive, you have other groups as well instead as like partial dominance and so on.
Thank you for your explanation. So, I guess the real question is whether the TCB budgies color changes depending on the dark factors the base colors has. For instance, if I have a dd blue TCB, does it make it “darker” than a blue TCB (no dark factor)?
 

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