• Welcome to Avian Avenue! To view our forum with less advertisments please register with us.
    Memberships are free and it will just take a moment. Click here

Plan on breeding my budgies, tips?

Loveofbird

Walking the driveway
Joined
12/2/20
Messages
164
So this won't happen until the way way future and honestly it'll only be a one time thing for the experience. I'd plan on keeping the babies so it isn't for profit. I'm asking this now because I want to get years of research before I do this. Just want to know any advice or tips? Equipment I must buy? And if you want to add why I should or shouldn't do this go ahead I am fine with this, I respect your opinions, but like I said it won't be until the way way future, think 10-15 years. I've been researching different sources as well but would love to hear what you guys think, I feel like when a person tells you it helps me understand more than an article. I know something like this would be expensive and hard work. I'm not oblivious to such things which is why I'm not jumping into it right away.
 

Zara

Try to be a rainbow in somebody else´s cloud ❤️
Super Moderator
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Avenue Concierge
Joined
1/8/18
Messages
20,981
Location
Málaga
A good thing to do is to invest in a book. One written by someone very knowledgable that you can use for reference. These sorts of books can be expensive, but worth the money.

Find yourself a mentor. Someone local who has experience that you can call and ask for help at any hours should any problems arise or you have concerns etc. They can teach you how to handfeed in advance so that you are prepared with the skill.

Have a vet available. Find yourself an out of hours clinic that you can visit in the event of emergencies.

Take into consideration your lifestyle. Will you be at home? With you be able to wake through the night every 2-3 hours should the little ones need handrearing from a young age? You would have to make sure that you have no vacations planned for the time you are expecting eggs to hatch and for the months afterwards factoring in that some birds take longer to wean. One of my chicks took 5.5 months to wean instead of the average less than 2, I had to cancel a lot of plans I had.

If you have a partner living with you, it is worth you both learning how to handfeed.

When researching, some of the info for breeding cockatiels and lovebirds is very similar to budgies, so you can read through articles for those birds, but just remember, growth rate and weights, feeding measurements and development stages will be different. But housing, temperatures, humidity, actual handfeeding, formula consistency and temp., weaning techniques will all be the same.

It´s a good idea to have the birds on the diet of your choice for a good few months before allowing breeding (seeds, pellets and veggies), and to have them fully flighted in a large cage. So you know who the parents are, house just one pair per cage (after they have paired up if you have multiple birds).
Start with allowing just one clutch first.

Attach the nestbox externally.

Equipment needed;
-Reference book
-Large cage with nestbox
-Shreddables/nesting material for parents
-Aspen shavings to line the box with (a good few inches - a bare box floor is not good)
-Brooder
-Heat pad
-Thermometer x2
-Hygrometer x2
-Pipettes
-Syringes/feeder spoon
-Small bowl or glass for mixing
-Formula
-ID Bands
-Small torch
-Calendar/diary to keep track of the chicks progress, weight, note temps, CC given, times etc
-Pedialyte

Be sure to scroll down and read all the posts on that thread, there´s tonnes of info - handfeeding charts, the prep guides for lots of brands formulas, how to make a feeder spoon, using papaya to fix slow crop (with video tutorial), how to prep formula and loads of other stuff.



 

tka

Rollerblading along the road
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
4/4/17
Messages
3,146
Location
London, UK
@PoukieBear has a good set of questions to ask yourself before breeding


Bear in mind that a pair that has bred before are likely to be primarily interested in each other and may want little to do with you. It can really change your relationship - is that something that you're willing to accept? Sadly it's not like having a dog or cat where they raise their young then go back to being your sweet-natured pet.

It's also essential to think long term. Are you going to be able to keep all of the budgies from that clutch for the rest of their lives? Are you able to provide enough space if they don't get on with each other? Are you able to afford the vet bills of a flock that will be getting old at the same time? What if you can't provide a life-long home for them? Are budgies easily available where you are? Are there cheap budgies for sale, or lots in rescues? If so, how will you ensure that any of your birds don't end up being bounced from home to home (or worse)?

Personally, I'd struggle to justify a one-off budgie clutch to myself. If I wanted a unique and challenging bird experience, I'd rescue and rehabilitate an unwanted or abused bird.
 

Sparkles99

Rollerblading along the road
Joined
8/9/20
Messages
1,276
Location
Ontario, Canada
You would also get a more varied flock if you rescued. :)
 

Loveofbird

Walking the driveway
Joined
12/2/20
Messages
164
A good thing to do is to invest in a book. One written by someone very knowledgable that you can use for reference. These sorts of books can be expensive, but worth the money.

Find yourself a mentor. Someone local who has experience that you can call and ask for help at any hours should any problems arise or you have concerns etc. They can teach you how to handfeed in advance so that you are prepared with the skill.

Have a vet available. Find yourself an out of hours clinic that you can visit in the event of emergencies.

Take into consideration your lifestyle. Will you be at home? With you be able to wake through the night every 2-3 hours should the little ones need handrearing from a young age? You would have to make sure that you have no vacations planned for the time you are expecting eggs to hatch and for the months afterwards factoring in that some birds take longer to wean. One of my chicks took 5.5 months to wean instead of the average less than 2, I had to cancel a lot of plans I had.

If you have a partner living with you, it is worth you both learning how to handfeed.

When researching, some of the info for breeding cockatiels and lovebirds is very similar to budgies, so you can read through articles for those birds, but just remember, growth rate and weights, feeding measurements and development stages will be different. But housing, temperatures, humidity, actual handfeeding, formula consistency and temp., weaning techniques will all be the same.

It´s a good idea to have the birds on the diet of your choice for a good few months before allowing breeding (seeds, pellets and veggies), and to have them fully flighted in a large cage. So you know who the parents are, house just one pair per cage (after they have paired up if you have multiple birds).
Start with allowing just one clutch first.

Attach the nestbox externally.

Equipment needed;
-Reference book
-Large cage with nestbox
-Shreddables/nesting material for parents
-Aspen shavings to line the box with (a good few inches - a bare box floor is not good)
-Brooder
-Heat pad
-Thermometer x2
-Hygrometer x2
-Pipettes
-Syringes/feeder spoon
-Small bowl or glass for mixing
-Formula
-ID Bands
-Small torch
-Calendar/diary to keep track of the chicks progress, weight, note temps, CC given, times etc
-Pedialyte

Be sure to scroll down and read all the posts on that thread, there´s tonnes of info - handfeeding charts, the prep guides for lots of brands formulas, how to make a feeder spoon, using papaya to fix slow crop (with video tutorial), how to prep formula and loads of other stuff.



Thank you so much, will definitely look through these :)
 

Loveofbird

Walking the driveway
Joined
12/2/20
Messages
164
@PoukieBear has a good set of questions to ask yourself before breeding


Bear in mind that a pair that has bred before are likely to be primarily interested in each other and may want little to do with you. It can really change your relationship - is that something that you're willing to accept? Sadly it's not like having a dog or cat where they raise their young then go back to being your sweet-natured pet.

It's also essential to think long term. Are you going to be able to keep all of the budgies from that clutch for the rest of their lives? Are you able to provide enough space if they don't get on with each other? Are you able to afford the vet bills of a flock that will be getting old at the same time? What if you can't provide a life-long home for them? Are budgies easily available where you are? Are there cheap budgies for sale, or lots in rescues? If so, how will you ensure that any of your birds don't end up being bounced from home to home (or worse)?

Personally, I'd struggle to justify a one-off budgie clutch to myself. If I wanted a unique and challenging bird experience, I'd rescue and rehabilitate an unwanted or abused bird.
Thank you for the information and your opinion, I plan on having birds for as long as I live and will definitely rescue as well. This is just something I want to experience....maybe it's not a good reason but i still want to try, hope that doesn't make me sound like a horrible person. This is also something I will only do when I can and not just because I want to. This is why I'm doing research about it 10-15 years before I even try. As of now I wouldn't be able to have the money or time for it which is why I want to do it later. And even if in 10-15 years I still don't have time or money then I won't do it. When I do breed I will be sure I have the time and money to do it. If I never have the time or money then I won't do it, I would never put my birds in a bad type of situation ever. Once again thank you so much for the advice and opinion I respect it very much
 

PoukieBear

Rollerblading along the road
Avenue Veteran
Joined
9/23/13
Messages
1,070
Location
Ottawa, Ontario
Real Name
Michelle
You've been given some great advice already, so I won't duplicate what has already been said (Other than read my post that was linked in post #6)

One other thing to think about since you mentioned that you plan on keeping the chicks.... is inbreeding. Budgies have crazy hormones during breeding season, and they don't differentiate between family members or non-related birds. If they are ready to mate, they can (and will) mate with a sibling or parent.

Having a spare cage or two is going to be mandatory for you, so you can separate them when needed. Personally, I would have a flight cage for the males, and a flight cage for the females.
 
Top