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New Alexandrine

SherbertDibdab

Checking out the neighborhood
Joined
3/13/19
Messages
2
Real Name
Zoe
Hi all,

I am new to this forum and new to owning a high needs kinda bird

We were given our Alexandrine (Sherbert) about two months ago so it should be about 11 months old. It started off quite coy but was happy to step up onto our arm and make its way up to the shoulder (with a closed fist - no fingers) or from a stick.

For the past month it has been squawking horrendously every morning and is not at all sociable or hungry at this time so placating it is very tricky. Sometimes the squawking can go on for one hour. This morning I managed to get Sherbert up easily on my shoulder but my partner couldn't. This is a recurring theme. (Sherbert does seem more settled right now). My hope was that getting Sherbert on the shoulder first thing may decrease this behaviour?

We live in a beautiful rural area and all the birds outside are making their morning calls with their flocks at this time. Sulphur Crested Cockatoos. Red Tailed Black Cockatoos, Magpies, Kookaburras, Wonga Pigeons, Wompoo Pigeons, Satin Bower Birds, Willy Wag Tails etc. Is Sherbert just joining in with this? It gets pretty annoying and this morning while on my shoulder I got a screech in the ear!

I bought some new toys for the cage yesterday to alternate and relieve any boredom - when we're out. At night the cage is closed and covered with a sheet. In the morning we open it all up and allow Sherbert free range. Unfortunately Sherbert seems to always be eyeballing the cage even when perched on the shoulder, looking to get back on there.

Is this adolescence as I've read about them going through this stage? How do we decrease the crazy morning squawking please? Sherbert does squawk later in the day; when we go out or when we return home and occasionally in response to the Cockatoos.

The rubbing of the beak is quite a thjng too, especially in the morning. Almost quite frantic. We have some hardwood sticks in the cage that we use as perches. There's a pumice perch and suitable grinding toys which hang from the top of the cage. Could it be something or just nothing?

Thanks all thanks
 

Kodigirl210

Rollerblading along the road
Joined
10/13/18
Messages
1,403
Location
Cali
If Sherbert is a female then it is most likely hormones that are making her so noisy. They can breed as early as 1yr old. To help that make sure her cage is completely blacked out-no light at all and make sure she gets plenty of sleep - at least 12 hours. Some people reduce the amount of seed and increase other food which also seems to help lower the hormone level.

Putting Sherbert on your shoulder isn’t likely to do anything except leave you open to being possibly bit on the face and neck. Until you understand exactly why she is so unhappy it would be best not to put her on your shoulder. Also be aware that hormones do tend to make them more agitated and over-stimulated so again don’t leave yourself open like that. Also, the shoulder should be a reward for good behavior not a reward for bad behavior. By placing Sherbert on your shoulder you are reinforcing the fact that it’s good to misbehave. Better would be to redirect her energy by doing a training session or playing with toys or other distractions.

As I understand it, these particular parrots aren’t as interested in the cuddle/scritch thing so training would be my choice.

Birds are early risers. It may be too that Sherbert wants to be up and about on business and is just voicing that.

Most likely it is hormones and hopefully once the season is over Sherbert will go back to normal.

Good Luck ;)
 

SherbertDibdab

Checking out the neighborhood
Joined
3/13/19
Messages
2
Real Name
Zoe
Yes, thank you for the reply.

We don't put Sherbert up in the shoulder usually until some calm has gone. Generally we try getting S out of the cage and roamin of their own free will.

We are unsure if the sex yet. Apparently Alexandrine's can remain androgynous to the human eye until approx 18 months of age. A pet store man who trains Macquaws etc suggested S may be a male as it's not very bitey. Anyway, your advice and caution will definitely be taken.

The cage is well blacked out and an early night is had. Generally in bed by 7:30pm and up when my partner arises at 6:30am.

Do you have any ideas on good places to look for training this type of bird please? So far this forum is the best info I have found yet, otherwise we are going round in circles with finding fresh info.

Hormones yes. How long is a season?
 

sunnysmom

Ripping up the road
Avenue Veteran
Celebirdy of the Month
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Joined
9/16/13
Messages
28,889
Location
Pennsylvania
Real Name
Michelle
Welcome to the forum! It's very possible your bird is chirping with the outside birds. A lot of birds are vocal in the morning.

Barbara Heidenreich has a lot of good training info: Barbara Heidenreich | Good Bird Inc.
 

Les charlson

Walking the driveway
Joined
6/23/18
Messages
150
Hi. I am in Oz and feel your pain. Mine do their call of the people every morning. Are you curtains closed or open when S begins? If S is calling on your shoulder its either a warning to you there is danger or they like to participate with the outside birds. I think the former. Could you post a head shot, from the side as sometimes you can get an idea of sex. Oh, they are not normally noisy, it more the morning thing and when they learn words they tend to use those.
 
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