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Help training dogs to not jump up onto cage

conureluv

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I have two terriers, one’s 1 and the other is 5. The younger one ( Bailey ) is already used to being in my room and at no point has jumped up onto the cage. The older one ( Scout ) on the other hand, whines and barks when I try to teach her it’s bad to jump. I go to school, and my guardian says it’s necessary to keep the door open so that it’s not a sauna in there. I normally leave at around 7:15 and come home by 4:00. Any help would be appreciated with training Scout.
 

Shezbug

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Can you get a baby gate (or something similar) and just block the door way to your room so the door can be open but the dog can’t enter while you’re not home?
 

tka

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I agree, a baby gate would be ideal. They're easy to install, don't leave marks and adjustable to fit the doorway.

I don't think you're going to have much luck training a dog with a strong prey drive not to jump at the small, fluttery thing. They're basically going to think you're inexplicably keeping dinner in a cage. If they're smart enough, they'll stay down then jump up again as soon as your back is turned.
 

conureluv

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I agree, a baby gate would be ideal. They're easy to install, don't leave marks and adjustable to fit the doorway.

I don't think you're going to have much luck training a dog with a strong prey drive not to jump at the small, fluttery thing. They're basically going to think you're inexplicably keeping dinner in a cage. If they're smart enough, they'll stay down then jump up again as soon as your back is turned.
Alright. I just think they can jump over a baby gate though....
 

Destiny

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You might look for an extra tall gate, if they are jumpers. I have a four foot high baby gate for my large dogs. The only one that ever got over it was our standard poodle, but I swear he was part deer. Our normal dogs just accept that the gate has won and move on.

These gates are too tall to step over, so they open.

71BHq+d5qGL._SY606_.jpg

The only downside with extra tall gates is that they are bulky and harder to take up/down if you want to close the door.

...

As far as training a terrier not to jump up on a bird cage when you are not present ... ehh ... that will be tough. I think you are better off relying on physical barriers, like height and visual blocks.
 

conureluv

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You might look for an extra tall gate, if they are jumpers. I have a four foot high baby gate for my large dogs. The only one that ever got over it was our standard poodle, but I swear he was part deer. Our normal dogs just accept that the gate has won and move on.

These gates are too tall to step over, so they open.

View attachment 349844

The only downside with extra tall gates is that they are bulky and harder to take up/down if you want to close the door.

...

As far as training a terrier not to jump up on a bird cage when you are not present ... ehh ... that will be tough. I think you are better off relying on physical barriers, like height and visual blocks.
Funny that that was the exact one I was looking at on Amazon!!
 

scrape

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Tall baby gate or close the door. Some way to physically keep them out. There is no other way, unless you guardian/roomate(s) are very vigilant.
 

melissasparrots

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I'd go with the baby gate and a sharp NO if the dog even looks at the bird. Actually, it will be unpopular here, but I'd also back it up with a blast from a spray bottle. With terriers, I'd also make extra sure that your cage is so sturdy there is never a chance that it can be knocked over or off a stand. Also, never have the bird out unless you have visual confirmation that the dog is not in the room and the door is closed. I had some close calls with a yorkie that had a high prey drive. Sometimes you can just see problems coming. Your dogs sound like the kind of problem where you'll just have to never take chances. Ever. And make it idiot proof. Cage can't be knocked over. Bird cannot escape from cage. No one ever takes bird out of the cage (not even once) without confirming that dog is not in room and door is closed and latched. Everyone knows when bird is out, the door does not open.
 

Shezbug

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I'd go with the baby gate and a sharp NO if the dog even looks at the bird. Actually, it will be unpopular here, but I'd also back it up with a blast from a spray bottle. With terriers, I'd also make extra sure that your cage is so sturdy there is never a chance that it can be knocked over or off a stand. Also, never have the bird out unless you have visual confirmation that the dog is not in the room and the door is closed. I had some close calls with a yorkie that had a high prey drive. Sometimes you can just see problems coming. Your dogs sound like the kind of problem where you'll just have to never take chances. Ever. And make it idiot proof. Cage can't be knocked over. Bird cannot escape from cage. No one ever takes bird out of the cage (not even once) without confirming that dog is not in room and door is closed and latched. Everyone knows when bird is out, the door does not open.
I did the no and spray bottle with my huge dog because she hates getting wet and she gets herself well over excited if you even speak too much to her so the more you need to tell her no the more excited and silly she will get and that was not acceptable around the bird cages as far as I am concerned. She got the one shot of spray and a harsh NO at the perfect timing and now she hardly ever even goes anywhere near the cages including the empty cage, she will always take a wide path to get past them. She would not have learned any other way and with her size she will do serious damage to Burt's cage if she smashes into it while being a fool but the budgie cage would be rendered totally useless so it is necessary she behaves around the birds. With my old dog (no longer with me) I just clapped (getting hard of hearing when he met the birds) and said no whenever he showed too much interest in the birds. I would honestly never trust any dog alone (unattended) around bird cages though so if I was not able to have eyes and full attention on either the birds or the dogs then the dogs got locked away from the birds. In all my life I have only had one dog I would have felt safe leaving around birds and cages, she was like a robot though- she never did anything unless she was told to.
 

melissasparrots

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Terriers are really hard to train the prey drive out of. I would not bet on being able to do it successfully. You might get them to the point where they are decent when you are present. But then all bets would be off when you are not there. Still, I would count on them being predictably unpredictable and ready to get a bird at any moment.
I don't have problems with dogs. But, I selected breeds that aren't known for being super predatory. The dachshund was an exception, but he comes from a specific bloodline that has many generations of working with birds. They all got the spray bottle treatment and all were puppies coming into a house with birds. Older, high prey drive breed being introduced to new prey animal...just assume they want to eat the bird.
 
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