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Baby to adult. Will they still love me?

melissasparrots

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My cockatiel already does that and is not tame. He screams a lot when he hears noises so I thought he was lonely. I'm not sure I am what he is looking for as a companion, I'm not sure what to do . I don't want him to be lonely. If I play music he screams, if he hears the kettle he screams if he hears me sing he screams.
Cockatiels can be screamy. He might be doing his version of flock calling. You can get him a mate, but he might still scream. Mine used to scream at times of increased activity and noise. If you do get him a mate, make sure you have a plan for what to do with eggs. Lots of baby cockatiel lives are lost from well meaning pet owners trying to let nature take its course. Or stunted babies produced. Having a mated pair can be heart breaking unless you are okay with removing eggs and substituting fake eggs so that none hatch. However, if you are okay with having an untame cockatiel, he may be happier with a companion. You could also check around and see if cockatiels do well with same sex pairs. I never tried putting two males together, so I can't advise about that. Two males together would be a disaster for some species but just fine for others.
 

Tara81

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I really wanted him to be tame but I am getting the impression he won't be. I am unsure if he likes me or not lol.
 

Rooary

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You know... Birds really are something.

Person A could raise a bird after they're weaned and, once it matures or even further down the road, it will seek companionship in someone else. Person B could do the exact same, and the bird would forever be loyal to them. Or, so I've read from all these different experiences. Every bird, as I've come to understand, is different. You can't rely on someone else's experience, fully, because it is not identical to yours - and neither are the birds! They are just like any other animal, complete with their own personalities, triggers, motivations, and understandings of things. It's about how they are raised and trained and treated.

I think that a lot of the time, even when people "know what to expect" and have done their research, they still expect too much from their birds. Specifically the larger species of parrots and cockatoos. I don't think that being hand-fed, wild-caught, parent-raised has everything to do with how your relationship with your birds will be or how it could/will change. Nor do I think that they necessarily need to be with a mate (in this instance, I mean a human "mate") in order to be happy once they mature. Sure, they will get hormonal and they will try to act on those instincts, but that will always pass. I do think that the experiences they have will impact their relationship with their owners.

What's more important than trying to guess how your bird will feel about you in the days, months, or years to come is to focus on strengthening the trust you have with it today. Don't take it personal that they don't cling to you every second of their waking hours, and if they do... well, I'm sure you regret not embracing their independence!

I'm sure there are plenty of success stories for birds that were raised from a baby to an adult by the same owner, just like there are plenty of unsuccessful stories about it. To anyone getting a young bird, the advice I'd give is to realize the small window that many young animals have to being socialized to different people, animals, and even places (and desensitized to the situations that come with them). What you do with that time will set them up for the rest of their lives. SOCIALIZE SOCIALIZE SOCIALIZE: expose it to all kinds of possible situations it might face in the future. Think about if something were to happen to you or if you just can't keep it anymore after so many years, would you really want your bird to be a one-person velcro bird then? Think long-term, not about how adorable it is or how much you want to cuddle it. Teach it what is acceptable behavior or not, do not baby it simply because it's cute and sweet. In my experience, any animal that gets babied from a young age turns into a disobedient terror to have around. Or a just plain demanding, disrespectful nuisance that thinks it can get away with anything. Sorry, that was somewhat ranty, but really. You're not doing your animal(s) any favors by coddling and sheltering them. I'm not saying be cruel or anything, but don't be a pushover either.

Disclaimer: I say "I think..." a lot, because everything is simply my own opinion formed from my own experiences and research. Take it with a grain of salt ^-^
 
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baserock love

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Reading this thread makes me really glad i got a rehome. Brought home a 2 year old bronze wing just 5 days ago and she's still adjusting to the new place and i got a feeling her previous owner was her "dad" so hopefully I don't end up being dad #2. IT didn't even occur to me this "leaving the nest" syndrome would make raising a bird from a baby counter productive to what you probably want out of the relationship. I only got a rehome because I know know matter what animal you want there's ones that need a home.

Cockatiels can be screamy. He might be doing his version of flock calling. You can get him a mate, but he might still scream. Mine used to scream at times of increased activity and noise. If you do get him a mate, make sure you have a plan for what to do with eggs. Lots of baby cockatiel lives are lost from well meaning pet owners trying to let nature take its course. Or stunted babies produced. Having a mated pair can be heart breaking unless you are okay with removing eggs and substituting fake eggs so that none hatch. However, if you are okay with having an untame cockatiel, he may be happier with a companion. You could also check around and see if cockatiels do well with same sex pairs. I never tried putting two males together, so I can't advise about that. Two males together would be a disaster for some species but just fine for others.
My sorta parrot mentor who's been guiding me through owning my first parrot has two male cockatiels who are best buds and definitely partners in crime. Just throwing that out there. She's had them for like 15 years.
 

macawpower58

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Every so often I see my old thread reappear. It's hard to believe I first wrote this in 2012, and my last post I think was around 2015 or 2016.

I figured I'll update everyone again on the continuing sage. ;)

Sweden my Goffin is becoming a stripper. Every year she takes off a little more. She's also trying to mate with every toy she has, and has been doing this for years.
In fact all my birds are hormonal monsters. Toddlers get free lessons in my house! My 5 year old Grandson asks some interesting questions.

Sweden is still her lovable, devilish self. Would be on me 24/7 if allowed. She can get her panties in a bunch once in a while, but I haven't seen much aggression from her at all. One nip this year.

Solomon is also humping everything in sight. If I even reach to pet him he squats and chitters. Gosh I wish these birds would calm down on the masturbation front!
No bites from Solomon. He's a sweetheart that loves company, but not snuggling.

Chaos is still a handful. One bad bite a month or so ago. I gave him a treat with the wrong hand.
He also is insanely hormonal. I watch TV to birdie moans.
Most of the time he is fine. He wanders the house, playing under any overhanging blanket he can find. Under my bed is his new hangout.
He'll join me on the couch for a bit, then it's off to do birdie things.
Then he gets in a mood. Usually I see it coming, but at times it's instant, and he's faster than me. At least his bites are quick and he doesn't hang on or grind.
I think they even surprise him when it happens. He's not being mean to me, but he's reacting to something I'm not aware of.

I want old OLD birds. :p Ones that aren't doing 'it' every moment of every day.
Oh well, I guess I'll just have to deal with my house of ill repute, for however long it lasts.

I keep hearing it does stop. Anyone know when?


 

Kenzie

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Question- I DO plan on getting a baby macaw but I do not, however, plan to hand-raise it. I want the store or breeder or whatever to do it- hand feed and what not. I would, however, visit the bird as much as possible while they are weaning. Would that possibly break the possible issue of him wanting to "leave the nest" if he left his surrogate mothers at the store? I guess I'm asking if he will see ME as mom when he comes home despite me not having hand-fed him or anything?
 

JLcribber

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Question- I DO plan on getting a baby macaw but I do not, however, plan to hand-raise it. I want the store or breeder or whatever to do it- hand feed and what not. I would, however, visit the bird as much as possible while they are weaning. Would that possibly break the possible issue of him wanting to "leave the nest" if he left his surrogate mothers at the store? I guess I'm asking if he will see ME as mom when he comes home despite me not having hand-fed him or anything?
No. Because they don't grow up until about 7 years old. That gives you ample time to become "mom" in their eyes.
 

Macawnutz

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Question- I DO plan on getting a baby macaw but I do not, however, plan to hand-raise it. I want the store or breeder or whatever to do it- hand feed and what not. I would, however, visit the bird as much as possible while they are weaning. Would that possibly break the possible issue of him wanting to "leave the nest" if he left his surrogate mothers at the store? I guess I'm asking if he will see ME as mom when he comes home despite me not having hand-fed him or anything?

I have 8 macaws. 1 I handfed, 1 I got after weaning and 1 I got when he was three. The rest were adopted after age 9 I believe. My older birds are much more mannered, just as loving and I don't blame myself for every rotten thing they do. ;) I'd adopt an older bird 1000 times before getting a baby again. Lol
 

JLcribber

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I want the store or breeder or whatever to do it- hand feed and what not
This is when the psychological damage is done and they lose their "identity" as a bird. Which results in an unnatural human/mate bond.
 

Kenzie

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I have 8 macaws. 1 I handfed, 1 I got after weaning and 1 I got when he was three. The rest were adopted after age 9 I believe. My older birds are much more mannered, just as loving and I don't blame myself for every rotten thing they do. ;) I'd adopt an older bird 1000 times before getting a baby again. Lol
Thank you. I have a lot of thinking and deciding to do over this.. and more questions to ask from other experiences. Have a few years before I am financially ready to take on my macaw though :).. so plenty of time to think.
It's a shame though! I work at a bird store and watching all of these people come in to play and bond with their babies has me so jealous at times and it's an experience I want to go through.
 

melissasparrots

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Question- I DO plan on getting a baby macaw but I do not, however, plan to hand-raise it. I want the store or breeder or whatever to do it- hand feed and what not. I would, however, visit the bird as much as possible while they are weaning. Would that possibly break the possible issue of him wanting to "leave the nest" if he left his surrogate mothers at the store? I guess I'm asking if he will see ME as mom when he comes home despite me not having hand-fed him or anything?
No. They will bond to whomever and that bond may or may not survive through adulthood. Despite the title of this thread, there is an excellent chance that the bird will stay with the person it originally bonds to. You might have better luck if you get a female. Although, if there is more than one person in your house, there is no guarantee that the the bird will choose you now or later as its favorite.
 

melissasparrots

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I have 8 macaws. 1 I handfed, 1 I got after weaning and 1 I got when he was three. The rest were adopted after age 9 I believe. My older birds are much more mannered, just as loving and I don't blame myself for every rotten thing they do. ;) I'd adopt an older bird 1000 times before getting a baby again. Lol
With macaws, I agree with this statement. Cosmo was a royal pain the butt for the first 7 years of her life. Now, she's almost as sweet as everyone says hyacinths should be. Although, just for clarity, even rehomed birds can switch bonds. They might be fond of one person at the rescue or old owner's house and then a few weeks into the new home, decide they like someone else even more.
 

Kenzie

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With macaws, I agree with this statement. Cosmo was a royal pain the butt for the first 7 years of her life. Now, she's almost as sweet as everyone says hyacinths should be. Although, just for clarity, even rehomed birds can switch bonds. They might be fond of one person at the rescue or old owner's house and then a few weeks into the new home, decide they like someone else even more.
Okay. So essentially I am taking more of a gamble with a baby bird because it may have a different preference in who to bond with as it gets older? And less about "leaving the nest?"
Or both? Birds are so weird :)
 

JLcribber

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Okay. So essentially I am taking more of a gamble with a baby bird because it may have a different preference in who to bond with as it gets older? And less about "leaving the nest?"
Or both? Birds are so weird :)
If you get an adult bird. What you see is what you get. If that bird picks you and you bring it home, you couldn't possibly ask for a more grateful loving bird (usually of any species).
 

melissasparrots

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Okay. So essentially I am taking more of a gamble with a baby bird because it may have a different preference in who to bond with as it gets older? And less about "leaving the nest?"
Or both? Birds are so weird :)
I don't think so. I'd place about equal odds that the bird's first preference whether it be a rescue or a rehome will remain their favorite. My preference for older macaws is because the babies are so naughty. Literally like having a 2 year old for several years straight. Can't hold still. Purposefully getting into trouble to gain attention, insistent on crunching on fingers and needing to learn rules, pushing the limits of the rules, looking for loopholes in the rules. Eventually they grow up and breaking the rules isn't quite as fascinating although they'll still take an opportunity to eat the mini blinds or the tv remote the instant the opportunity presents itself. With a baby, eating the remote control, obsessing over plans to eat the remote control, crunching fingers because they are a barrier that prevents them from eating the remote control etc. are far more interesting than sitting still to be petted. They can have an extensive juvenile delinquent phase. My young cockatoos and amazons were easier to get along with as babies. Although those species have their drawbacks too.

Most of the time I really enjoy the baby phase and growing with the bird. In the case of my macaw, I kind of questioned if she was the right bird for me for several years until she calmed down. There is a certain push on this board to get people to rescue older birds. Some people here are very anti-breeder and therefore will not suggest a breeder and will be quick to give reasons why a baby is not a good choice. Regarding bonding, I think its a crap shoot no matter which way you go. Even rehomed birds can be fickle for the first year or two while they are settling in. With babies, people feel a lot more betrayal if it switches bonds after a few years. There really isn't any guarantee either way. At some point you have to love the bird for being a bird, even if you are not the favorite. If that is a problem...dogs are really great pets too. Even they will tend to choose favorites. Its just they don't treat the less favorite like garbage.
 

LSA

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If you get an adult bird. What you see is what you get. If that bird picks you and you bring it home, you couldn't possibly ask for a more grateful loving bird (usually of any species).
That's DEFINITELY been my experience! As I have learned over and over, the most loyal and loving birds are rescues!

two male cockatiels who are best buds and definitely partners in crime.
That describes my two conure boys perfectly!
 

SandraK

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GCC Beni, the oldest & alpha bird, bonded to me. He's 10-11 years old and I've always belonged to him. Right now he's going through a hormonal phase and is nippier than I'd like but a total cuddle bug. He's happy to cuddle up to my hair and just stay there. He has even got so brazen that he'll fly @ Tikki (sun) if Tik is sitting on me or anywhere near me. To a certain extent, his flying at Tik on me is just desserts since Tik has done exactly the same thing to Beni and knocked him off my shoulder.

But since you only have Waffles, I think the odds are in your favour. Waffles is your bird and there's no-one to compete with.
 

TraceyRay

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I am new to bird "ownership" (yeah, … I own them…sure). My fiancé and I have 2 young female (tested) parrots, a 1yr old GC Conure, and an 8mo Quaker. I've always wanted to get a large parrot, a Harlequin Macaw being my dream-bird followed by a Hyacinth, but we wanted to start out with something smaller (NOT a "starter”) and then decide if we could successfully add a large parrot to the family.

We have decided to go ahead with it, but we both wanted to adopt an adult, not for bonding reasons, but because we're both in our mid-thirties, and we hate the idea of a smart/bonded animal outliving us and having to start over after 30/40yrs, added bonus: we can skip the crazy teen years. This post has given me a whole new perspective and reinforced finding an adult, so thank you for that. I was going to look at a Blue/Gold Macaw baby this weekend (because we can't find an adult), but now I'm re-thinking that.

Sidenote: I joined the forum b/c it seems that every time I google a question about one of the ladies, this forum has the answer! It's such a great resource for those of us without any experienced bird-people in our lives!
 

tka

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I am new to bird "ownership" (yeah, … I own them…sure). My fiancé and I have 2 young female (tested) parrots, a 1yr old GC Conure, and an 8mo Quaker. I've always wanted to get a large parrot, a Harlequin Macaw being my dream-bird followed by a Hyacinth, but we wanted to start out with something smaller (NOT a "starter”) and then decide if we could successfully add a large parrot to the family.

We have decided to go ahead with it, but we both wanted to adopt an adult, not for bonding reasons, but because we're both in our mid-thirties, and we hate the idea of a smart/bonded animal outliving us and having to start over after 30/40yrs, added bonus: we can skip the crazy teen years. This post has given me a whole new perspective and reinforced finding an adult, so thank you for that. I was going to look at a Blue/Gold Macaw baby this weekend (because we can't find an adult), but now I'm re-thinking that.

Sidenote: I joined the forum b/c it seems that every time I google a question about one of the ladies, this forum has the answer! It's such a great resource for those of us without any experienced bird-people in our lives!
Honestly, I would wait a few years until your babies have at least gone through puberty. Hormones can be tricky for birds and their people to navigate, and the last thing you need is another bird in the mix. Your adolescent birds will need your time and attention. You may find that the two you have are more than enough for you! Even if you decide to add a macaw to your family later, you'll have a better idea of what hormonal and/or challenging and/or sexual behaviour looks like in birds.
 

LaSelva

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Honestly, I would wait a few years until your babies have at least gone through puberty.
There's a book out there called "Parrots of the Wild" that has a section on the ages of reproductive readiness for various parrot species.

I don't have the book in front of me at the moment but if I remember correctly parrots that are approximately the size of a green cheek conure or smaller are sexually mature and active by the next breeding season after hatching.

As for the larger birds (like macaws) it doesn't take years for them to become sexually mature in the biological sense. They are sexually mature much earlier but what happens is they are not "behaviourally" ready to breed. They form pair bonds early in life (post fledgling) and will spend years together, synchronizing their behavior and even "playing house" (by claiming nest sites and going through the motions) only to abandon the effort.

It's amazing how so much of their lives is geared towards mate selection and reproduction, beginning with their first learned vocalisations in the nest.
 
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