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Rescued baby

Zara

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SumitaSinh

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I'm worried. Today morning when I took the weight, it is 160 gm (yesterday it was 164). The baby is otherwise actiive, poop is also well formed and green in color. But he refuses to eat after few gulps, as if he's done with it and tries to run away. What should I do?
@Zara @Monica
 

Zara

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I have seen that before with chicks. When they pull back, wait a minute or two and try again. Is he eating any adult foods?
The poops will change once he eats foods other than formula.
 

SumitaSinh

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I have seen that before with chicks. When they pull back, wait a minute or two and try again. Is he eating any adult foods?
The poops will change once he eats foods other than formula.
Thanks, I was so worried. No he's not taking any adult food yet.
 

Zara

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Try offering to soaked pellets or steamed veggies after the formula, see if he gives it a go. It is a good time to start showing him new things so he gets used to seeing them, and exploring.
 

SumitaSinh

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I'll start that.
 

Xoetix

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You’re doing phenomenally!
 

Emma&pico

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Zara

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He doesn't need entertainment per se, but it is rare for parrot chicks to be alone so making a "clutchling" is a good idea. You can use a rolled up cotton sock, or a small plush toy with no loose threads or fluff or other loose parts. (I used a blue whale a few times and cut the label off it).
I am just tidying up ready for family coming over tomorrow and I found something that is a good example;

Here I would cut the label off and the loop too;
IMG_20240404_183239.jpg
 

Monica

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Based on the wings, and assuming this is no hybrid.... that is a baby alexandrine. Indian ringnecks DO NOT have red on the wings! ;)

And... also based on feathering.... when you shared the photo, the chick was likely around 6 weeks old.... which should mean that the chick is now around 7 weeks old.

Looking at growth charts of the species you have can help to determine age! ;) Found a video series! :D



So you may be looking at another 5-7 weeks of feeding formula... but as the chick ages, he, or she, will be eating less and less baby food. That's normal.


I would highly recommend providing sprouted seeds and finely chopped fruits and vegetables. Maybe finely chopped walnuts, too? If you plan on feeding pellets, also offer those. It's okay if the baby doesn't eat the food, you still want to provide it as he/she may start exploring the food with their mouth.

If the chick is up for exploring at all, you can also offer safe foliage from trees. Providing different textures and items can help to "socialize" the chick to a variety of things. Using a vacuum, playing music, etc are all great things. Once the chick is old enough, safely taking the chick places can be great as well. This can work on teaching going into a carrier safely, *maybe* wearing a harness... going to the vets office, hardware stores, or other areas that animals are welcomed. (ensuring bird is ALWAYS secure) If you choose to keep this baby, it will make it easier if you ever need to go to the vets office or somewhere if your baby is already used to car rides, carriers, etc.
 

SumitaSinh

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Based on the wings, and assuming this is no hybrid.... that is a baby alexandrine. Indian ringnecks DO NOT have red on the wings! ;)

And... also based on feathering.... when you shared the photo, the chick was likely around 6 weeks old.... which should mean that the chick is now around 7 weeks old.

Looking at growth charts of the species you have can help to determine age! ;) Found a video series! :D



So you may be looking at another 5-7 weeks of feeding formula... but as the chick ages, he, or she, will be eating less and less baby food. That's normal.


I would highly recommend providing sprouted seeds and finely chopped fruits and vegetables. Maybe finely chopped walnuts, too? If you plan on feeding pellets, also offer those. It's okay if the baby doesn't eat the food, you still want to provide it as he/she may start exploring the food with their mouth.

If the chick is up for exploring at all, you can also offer safe foliage from trees. Providing different textures and items can help to "socialize" the chick to a variety of things. Using a vacuum, playing music, etc are all great things. Once the chick is old enough, safely taking the chick places can be great as well. This can work on teaching going into a carrier safely, *maybe* wearing a harness... going to the vets office, hardware stores, or other areas that animals are welcomed. (ensuring bird is ALWAYS secure) If you choose to keep this baby, it will make it easier if you ever need to go to the vets office or somewhere if your baby is already used to car rides, carriers, etc.
Thank you so much for your valuable advice. Another question, when can I shift him in a cage? Right now he's in a cardboard box with nesting material.
 

Monica

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I would guess 6-7 weeks old. Maybe not quite 7 weeks old, but likely over 6. The feathers are not coming in solid, which indicates the baby has gone through a lot of stress. Nothing that can really be done about that right now, other than to ensure baby is in a safe environment and getting all the right food.

You can offer perches, maybe a log or other items that your baby can climb on to start learning how to grip and climb items.

Transitioning to a cage maybe around 9 weeks of age? Once the chick is fully feathered. Before then, you definitely want to keep the chick warm. I'm not sure on ideal temps, but would think 27-32 degrees C, or 80-90 degrees F for room temp, or nursery temp. Maybe 27/80 may be fine at current age?
 

zoo mom

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What a cutie.
 

SumitaSinh

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I would guess 6-7 weeks old. Maybe not quite 7 weeks old, but likely over 6. The feathers are not coming in solid, which indicates the baby has gone through a lot of stress. Nothing that can really be done about that right now, other than to ensure baby is in a safe environment and getting all the right food.

You can offer perches, maybe a log or other items that your baby can climb on to start learning how to grip and climb items.

Transitioning to a cage maybe around 9 weeks of age? Once the chick is fully feathered. Before then, you definitely want to keep the chick warm. I'm not sure on ideal temps, but would think 27-32 degrees C, or 80-90 degrees F for room temp, or nursery temp. Maybe 27/80 may be fine at current age?
Today I found an excellent research article about a study on nestling alexandrine parrot. According to that article, my baby is around 5 weeks old ( based on the appearance of various body feathers). Now, my question is, presently I'm feeding him 4 times a day. Shall I reduce the number of feeds and offer him boiled adult food etc? Or shall I wait for 2 more weeks? Today I offered some grated veggies but he wasn’t interested.
 

Monica

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It's great you were able to find additional information! However, judging from the video I found... I would honestly say this chick is older than 5 weeks! At 5 weeks, the chick is barely feathered at all where-as your chick has most of the feathering coming out on the wings and tail. I would still put the chick at 6+ weeks of age. Maybe not quite 7 but move than 6. (assuming growth hasn't been stunted in some way)


Many hand feeders often offer fresh food to the chicks just to get them accustomed to the presence of "adult" food and keep on feeding baby food - until the chick starts to refuse a feeding. That feeding is usually cut out but all others are continued... until once again, the chick starts to refuse a feeding. Eventually, the chick refuses all feedings. If the chick can sustain him or herself on the 'adult' food for two weeks without regressing, they're usually considered weaned at that point.
 

SumitaSinh

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It's great you were able to find additional information! However, judging from the video I found... I would honestly say this chick is older than 5 weeks! At 5 weeks, the chick is barely feathered at all where-as your chick has most of the feathering coming out on the wings and tail. I would still put the chick at 6+ weeks of age. Maybe not quite 7 but move than 6. (assuming growth hasn't been stunted in some way)


Many hand feeders often offer fresh food to the chicks just to get them accustomed to the presence of "adult" food and keep on feeding baby food - until the chick starts to refuse a feeding. That feeding is usually cut out but all others are continued... until once again, the chick starts to refuse a feeding. Eventually, the chick refuses all feedings. If the chick can sustain him or herself on the 'adult' food for two weeks without regressing, they're usually considered weaned at that point.
Thank you so much @Monica
 

SumitaSinh

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The problem is, weight. Two days back the baby's weight was 196gm. From yesterday it's decreasing @2gm/day. Today it's 192 gm. The baby is otherwise healthy, preening, flapping wings, cooing and cuddling with me. What should I do? @Zara @Monica
20240409_185356.jpg

He occupied my pillow :laugh:
 

Xoetix

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Maybe do an extra feeding? I wish I could help! Such a sweet little face :loveshower:
 
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