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Persistent Giardia

Kimchee216

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Hello everyone, I have a cockatiel, Kimchee. A few years ago I took her to the vet due to watery droppings and a small appetite. The vet took a sample of her droppings looked at it under her microscope and said it was giardia and a yeast infection. We treated her for both and she was fine for a while. Then the giardia came back a few times and we tried ronidazole in her water which would work for a few months. Then when it came back again we tried Metronidazole by squirting it in her mouth via syringe. That worked for a few months but then it came back again. We tried the same meds again and it came back after 2 weeks. The vet prescribed Paromomycin for two weeks and she just finished the 30th and she has watery poop again today. Most of the time she would look under the microscope, not see anything, and prescribe meds for giardia because she didn’t know what else it could be. I’m wondering if I should get a second opinion and maybe it’s something else because she only seems to be better when she’s actually on the meds. Is there anything else I can do if it is giardia? Any other meds I can try? I’m not sure what to do because it keeps coming back.

sorry for the long paragraph, thank you so much in advance for reading :)
 

Kimchee216

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Also right now her only symptom is watery droppings. She’s eating fine. I’m wondering if it could be the yeast infection back again because I don’t think the vet has checked for that. It’s a rly small vet. All she has for testing is a microscope. That’s why I’m thinking of maybe switching vets
 

Ripshod

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Are you sure she's not being re-infected through her water? Do you treat the water at all?
 

Kimchee216

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Are you sure she's not being re-infected through her water? Do you treat the water at all?
Re-infected by her water? Like do you mean is she pooping in her water? I keep it in a bowl that she can’t possibly poop in so it can’t be that. I used to use tap water but now I give her bottled because I figure it’s safer
 

CrazyKozmo

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I actually boil my water, for my birds, for 3 minutes to remove any "bugs". Yes, I live in Washington state and shouldn't have to do that, but last Fall one of my birds had a Pseudomona (bacterial) infection. Not sure where that came from. It tends to come from contaminated water (my filter system? my pipes?). She went on antibiotics and is better now. I still boil their water...I don't want them to go through that again. Giardia is a parasite found in water...
 

Kimchee216

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I actually boil my water, for my birds, for 3 minutes to remove any "bugs". Yes, I live in Washington state and shouldn't have to do that, but last Fall one of my birds had a Pseudomona (bacterial) infection. Not sure where that came from. It tends to come from contaminated water (my filter system? my pipes?). She went on antibiotics and is better now. I still boil their water...I don't want them to go through that again. Giardia is a parasite found in water...
Oh ok, thank you I will try that :)
 

Kimchee216

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Also, does anyone have a tips on what I can use to clean her cage that is safe but still kills bacteria. I’ve been using dawn soap but I know that probably won’t kill any bacteria
 

Hankmacaw

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My water system tests the water every year and sends every customer the results. Several years ago I saw that the sample contained giardia, but in too small concentration to effect humans. After the first few months of having my bird, I switched to bottled water, because I was fighting one issue after another (both birds had compromised immune systems). Issues subsided substantially after the change.

Giardia is tough to get rid of - really tough.
 

Hankmacaw

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Mark & Da Boyz

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Vinegar is a mild disinfectant I spray the cage with it, outside is best. And let it sit for a bit then rinse and let it sit in the sunshine. UV light will also kill bacteria. Hot soapy water for perches and bowls again rinse well and let dry before your bird starts climbing on and perching.
 

Hankmacaw

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Sorry @Mark & Da Boyz , but I respectively disagree with your assesment of white vinegar vs F10. The following is from a reptile site, but applies to all disinfectants. No matter if for birds, reptiles, dogs, or cats.

Vinegar (acetic acid) on its own is a relatively good cleaner, especially on glass, but it is nowhere near as effective at killing the more dreadful of microbes. Vinegar alone is not an adequate disinfectant when you have a major health issue on your hand.

Vinegar can be used full strength, or can be mixed 50:50 with water for a cleaning solution.


F10 veterinary disinfectant is a “new” formula that’s been recently approved (around 2010) by the US EPA, but has been around for a long time in the rest of the world for veterinary use. It is made from quaternary ammonium (Benzalkonium Chloride), and a biguanide compound, Polyhexamethylene Biguanide (PHMB). Typically, quaternary ammonium compounds are less effective against some viruses, but the inclusion of PHMB boosts the effectiveness by damaging cellular walls and possibly by damaging DNA and other nucleic acids. This formula serves to kill a wide range of micro organisms without the need to rinse, is non-irritating to skin and non-damaging to equipment. It’s been shown to be effective against a wide spectrum of microbes: bacteria, viruses, spores and fungi, with no evidence of microbial resistance as with other antibiotic compounds.

There are currently two formulas available on the US Market: F10®SC (super concentrate) for surface disinfecting and F10®SCXD for cleaning as well as disinfecting. For veterinary use or in cases of infestation, follow the use of F10®SCXD with a rinse and then the F10®SC spray for long-lasting protection.

Note that the concentrated formula must be diluted; in such high-concentration there may be irritation, but when mixed at the recommended ratio of 1:500 (2ml in one liter of water) there should be no ill effects. For higher levels of disinfection you can go up to 1:125.
For the 1:500 ratio of general cleaning:
32 oz spray bottles = .07 ounces of F10 per bottle
24 oz spray bottles = .05 ounce of F10 per bottle
You may want to read this. F10 SC
 

Mark & Da Boyz

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I never said white vinegar was as good or near to F10.I said it's a mild disinfectant as it is BUT if you need something heavy duty you need to look elsewhere. One think I like about vinegar is it won't hurt the birds. I seen some stuff that would disinfect your bird right to death.
 
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