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Parrot cant chill

Emma

Checking out the neighborhood
Joined
11/17/21
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3
Real Name
Emma
I have a severe macaw who is a delightful bird, when i spend time with him (talk/play with him at his cage) hes great, content just happy that im even in the room hell sit on the rope perch outside and purr you know chill and he could be like that for awhile he wont ever really get anxious or mad at me. He also will be generally happy being on my arm and purr so thats nice for pets/cuddles but of course i cant really do much with him on me all the time and he wouldnt like me trying to anyways . So for out of cage time that leaves me wanting to set him down on a chair or couch or something and be calm and happy with me in the room like he is when hes sitting on a perch at his cage right? I mean it should be the same. So what happens when I put him on a chair for example me prepping breakfast in the kitchen, he will sit on it and start preening and be happy for about a minute maybe two if we’re lucky. Then he’ll start making his anxiety i want to leave noises and do that standing wing flap thing. Unfortunately he cant fly because his wing is amputated, so i think that contributes to this cause he cant go where he wants to go. I talk to him every thirty seconds to try to entertain/calm him down hopefully but that doesnt really help he just goes back to being restless right after. If anyone has any thoughts on this or maybe thinks it could be possible to train him to be content for periods of time being on something thats not me or the cage? Thank you!
Emma :)
 

flyzipper

Rollerblading along the road
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Steve
Welcome to the forum! What's your guy's name?

I don't know your experience with birds, or how long your guy has been in your home, so I'll offer some thoughts which might focus the discussion.

First, birds are intelligent active creatures and do best when they have things to keep their minds engaged. What does he have to keep himself occupied when he's stationed somewhere that causes him to be anxious? Does he feel safe there? Can he see what's going on around him? Could you create a play station that's his, with activities he enjoys, where he still feels part of the action? Would he enjoy the stimulation of music while he doesn't have your attention? There are some areas of the forums dedicated to enrichment that have some great ideas.

I talk to him every thirty seconds to try to entertain/calm him down hopefully but that doesnt really help he just goes back to being restless right after.
Second, we reinforce what we reward. Your statement about actively trying to talk to and calm him, doesn't allow him to develop the skills he needs on his own to calm himself. If you ignore them for a while, but eventually succumb and do something for him when he makes anxious noises, you're training him how to get your attention. One way to train calm behaviour is to reward it. If you're able to ignore the anxious sounds, but still pay attention to he demeanour from afar, you could then choose to engage with him or reward him when he's calmed himself. Related to this, there's also the notion of "capturing" a desirable behavior -- as soon as he makes a pleasant sound or says a word between the anxiousness, that could also be a good time to engage or reward him. The key here is to be very aware of what we're rewarding.

Third, could you leverage his natural rhythms to avoid anxious situations? Are his energy levels elevated at specific times of the day? If so, you might consider leveraging that knowledge to adjust your schedule around his (mine are lower energy in the evening, so them being low key during an evening activity is easier than when they just woke up). There's also nothing wrong establishing a "nap time" routine when your guy is securely in his cage, and allows you to do focused uninterrupted work (I find late afternoon after they've been fed works for my guys). I do this even if I have nothing else to do, just to ensure my guys are comfortable on their own.

Lastly, routines and habits are important, and might shed some light. For example, I'm usually home, so it's not unexpected that mine are out of sorts after I return home on the rare occasions I'm out for the day. I also live alone, so it's to be expected they're on alert when somebody visits.

My Severe occasionally makes anxious noises too, and it is grating. One last thing to pay attention to is our own moods. If we're anxious, that can trigger our animal companions to be as well. It can also cause us to have a shorter fuse, and a behaviour that doesn't normally aggravate, suddenly does. I'm fairly calm, and low stress, but even I have to keep this in mind during these trying times.

Eventually we learn what's triggering an undesired behaviour, how to redirect it to healthier one, and create an environment for them to be happy and comfortable.

Thanks for wanting the best for your guy.
 

Shezbug

ASK ME FOR PICTURES OF MY MACAW!
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I’d try to make it so he can independently move about more and learn to enjoy doing things alone.
The other option that could help is involving him in what you’re doing instead of making him a stuck to the chair on looker.
 

April

Joyriding the Neighborhood
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What about a rolling playstand that you can take around the house with you so he can be entertained and play on it but still be in the room with you?
 

Emma

Checking out the neighborhood
Joined
11/17/21
Messages
3
Real Name
Emma
I have a severe macaw who is a delightful bird, when i spend time with him (talk/play with him at his cage) hes great, content just happy that im even in the room hell sit on the rope perch outside and purr you know chill and he could be like that for awhile he wont ever really get anxious or mad at me. He also will be generally happy being on my arm and purr so thats nice for pets/cuddles but of course i cant really do much with him on me all the time and he wouldnt like me trying to anyways . So for out of cage time that leaves me wanting to set him down on a chair or couch or something and be calm and happy with me in the room like he is when hes sitting on a perch at his cage right? I mean it should be the same. So what happens when I put him on a chair for example me prepping breakfast in the kitchen, he will sit on it and start preening and be happy for about a minute maybe two if we’re lucky. Then he’ll start making his anxiety i want to leave noises and do that standing wing flap thing. Unfortunately he cant fly because his wing is amputated, so i think that contributes to this cause he cant go where he wants to go. I talk to him every thirty seconds to try to entertain/calm him down hopefully but that doesnt really help he just goes back to being restless right after. If anyone has any thoughts on this or maybe thinks it could be possible to train him to be content for periods of time being on something thats not me or the cage? Thank you!
Emma :)
Welcome to the forum! What's your guy's name?

I don't know your experience with birds, or how long your guy has been in your home, so I'll offer some thoughts which might focus the discussion.

First, birds are intelligent active creatures and do best when they have things to keep their minds engaged. What does he have to keep himself occupied when he's stationed somewhere that causes him to be anxious? Does he feel safe there? Can he see what's going on around him? Could you create a play station that's his, with activities he enjoys, where he still feels part of the action? Would he enjoy the stimulation of music while he doesn't have your attention? There are some areas of the forums dedicated to enrichment that have some great ideas.



Second, we reinforce what we reward. Your statement about actively trying to talk to and calm him, doesn't allow him to develop the skills he needs on his own to calm himself. If you ignore them for a while, but eventually succumb and do something for him when he makes anxious noises, you're training him how to get your attention. One way to train calm behaviour is to reward it. If you're able to ignore the anxious sounds, but still pay attention to he demeanour from afar, you could then choose to engage with him or reward him when he's calmed himself. Related to this, there's also the notion of "capturing" a desirable behavior -- as soon as he makes a pleasant sound or says a word between the anxiousness, that could also be a good time to engage or reward him. The key here is to be very aware of what we're rewarding.

Third, could you leverage his natural rhythms to avoid anxious situations? Are his energy levels elevated at specific times of the day? If so, you might consider leveraging that knowledge to adjust your schedule around his (mine are lower energy in the evening, so them being low key during an evening activity is easier than when they just woke up). There's also nothing wrong establishing a "nap time" routine when your guy is securely in his cage, and allows you to do focused uninterrupted work (I find late afternoon after they've been fed works for my guys). I do this even if I have nothing else to do, just to ensure my guys are comfortable on their own.

Lastly, routines and habits are important, and might shed some light. For example, I'm usually home, so it's not unexpected that mine are out of sorts after I return home on the rare occasions I'm out for the day. I also live alone, so it's to be expected they're on alert when somebody visits.

My Severe occasionally makes anxious noises too, and it is grating. One last thing to pay attention to is our own moods. If we're anxious, that can trigger our animal companions to be as well. It can also cause us to have a shorter fuse, and a behaviour that doesn't normally aggravate, suddenly does. I'm fairly calm, and low stress, but even I have to keep this in mind during these trying times.

Eventually we learn what's triggering an undesired behaviour, how to redirect it to healthier one, and create an environment for them to be happy and comfortable.

Thanks for wanting the best for your guy.
Welcome to the forum! What's your guy's name?

I don't know your experience with birds, or how long your guy has been in your home, so I'll offer some thoughts which might focus the discussion.

First, birds are intelligent active creatures and do best when they have things to keep their minds engaged. What does he have to keep himself occupied when he's stationed somewhere that causes him to be anxious? Does he feel safe there? Can he see what's going on around him? Could you create a play station that's his, with activities he enjoys, where he still feels part of the action? Would he enjoy the stimulation of music while he doesn't have your attention? There are some areas of the forums dedicated to enrichment that have some great ideas.



Second, we reinforce what we reward. Your statement about actively trying to talk to and calm him, doesn't allow him to develop the skills he needs on his own to calm himself. If you ignore them for a while, but eventually succumb and do something for him when he makes anxious noises, you're training him how to get your attention. One way to train calm behaviour is to reward it. If you're able to ignore the anxious sounds, but still pay attention to he demeanour from afar, you could then choose to engage with him or reward him when he's calmed himself. Related to this, there's also the notion of "capturing" a desirable behavior -- as soon as he makes a pleasant sound or says a word between the anxiousness, that could also be a good time to engage or reward him. The key here is to be very aware of what we're rewarding.

Third, could you leverage his natural rhythms to avoid anxious situations? Are his energy levels elevated at specific times of the day? If so, you might consider leveraging that knowledge to adjust your schedule around his (mine are lower energy in the evening, so them being low key during an evening activity is easier than when they just woke up). There's also nothing wrong establishing a "nap time" routine when your guy is securely in his cage, and allows you to do focused uninterrupted work (I find late afternoon after they've been fed works for my guys). I do this even if I have nothing else to do, just to ensure my guys are comfortable on their own.

Lastly, routines and habits are important, and might shed some light. For example, I'm usually home, so it's not unexpected that mine are out of sorts after I return home on the rare occasions I'm out for the day. I also live alone, so it's to be expected they're on alert when somebody visits.

My Severe occasionally makes anxious noises too, and it is grating. One last thing to pay attention to is our own moods. If we're anxious, that can trigger our animal companions to be as well. It can also cause us to have a shorter fuse, and a behaviour that doesn't normally aggravate, suddenly does. I'm fairly calm, and low stress, but even I have to keep this in mind during these trying times.

Eventually we learn what's triggering an undesired behaviour, how to redirect it to healthier one, and create an environment for them to be happy and comfortable.

Thanks for wanting the best for your guy.
Thank you so much for your time you brought up a lot of great points. This guys name is Jayjay I got him about 3 1/2 years ago as a rescue, worked thru a lot of things hes blossomed into a really nice bird now and im just nitpicking some things. Youre totally right about me reinforcing the problem haha Im pretty good at not reinforcing screaming and such I guess i thought i was helping but your right that actually was just rewarding him. So with that I took him out at a time hes more relaxed which is the morningish and I kept a pocket full of treats to capture moments where he was being good and it looks like it helped! I have a play tree ordered im hoping he’ll like it like a second home, he used to like to hangout on the cat tree and would sometimes entertain himself with the rope knot toys attatched to it.
 

Emma

Checking out the neighborhood
Joined
11/17/21
Messages
3
Real Name
Emma
I’d try to make it so he can independently move about more and learn to enjoy doing things alone.
The other option that could help is involving him in what you’re doing instead of making him a stuck to the chair on looker.
Id really like to improve on that i feel that when he sees me often times he looks to me as his source of entertainment and is a bit needy
 
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