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how much hissing is too much?

Shilohbird

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Shiloh
I picked up Pocket and Jester from their foster mom today, and they've been absolutely darling. They're definitely scared, but they're playing and eating and being very brave. But Jester has been hissing a lot. It was almost non stop for the first half hour of the drive home and even now that he's home and chilling in his cage he's still hissing a bit. I assume it's just cause he's scared of me? He also has a tiny featherless patch on the back of his head, it looks like feather plucking but how could he pluck back there? I'm taking them to the vet in a month or so just for a general checkup, but I wanna know if this is something I should be worried about?
 

expressmailtome

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sunnysmom

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All cockatiels have a little bald spot under their crest. If it's different than that, another bird was probably plucking him. Hissing does mean he's scared/warning you off. You can cover three sides of the cage, leaving the front open, for a couple days to make him feel more secure and settle down. That way he doesn't have to be on alert for "danger" on all sides. Then just spend time sitting near them and you can read to them. That way they get used to you and your voice in a non threatening way.
 

Shilohbird

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Shiloh
All cockatiels have a little bald spot under their crest. If it's different than that, another bird was probably plucking him. Hissing does mean he's scared/warning you off. You can cover three sides of the cage, leaving the front open, for a couple days to make him feel more secure and settle down. That way he doesn't have to be on alert for "danger" on all sides. Then just spend time sitting near them and you can read to them. That way they get used to you and your voice in a non threatening way.
that's smart! the openings for their dishes are on the left and right, and so the only way I can feed them without reaching into their cage is by having the sides open. But I could cover them when I'm not giving them food and water. And he's already hissing way less just on the second day, poor baby was just terrified in the car!
 

sb sigmund

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Assuming you just brought the bird home just a day ago they're still settling in. Hissing is normal when they're in a new house with strangers. And yes, for a lot of mutations the bald patch is normal. My female has one
 

Aestatis

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If your gut tells you that it is a true bald patch vs the common lutino bald batch it is possible that Pocket was plucking him (assuming they share a cage). I will say that my luntio's bald batch will improve and worsen on its own, like the feathers on the head just like to fall out more easily.
 
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