• Welcome to Avian Avenue! To view our forum with less advertisments please register with us.
    Memberships are free and it will just take a moment. Click here

Pictures Does bumblefoot ever go away?

Status
Not open for further replies.

Brittany0208

Rollerblading along the road
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
4/8/18
Messages
2,877
After many months of medicine and adjustments, this is how his foot looks currently and for most of the time. Personally, I don't believe it'll ever completely heal given his disability, but will it always be inflamed, or will it eventually callous? I can't imagine it feeling good. It looks tender. This is the only picture I could get since he started squirming.
20200204_132620.jpg

He was happy to get back on his cushion.
20200204_133224.jpg

20200204_133236.jpg
 

Birdbabe

Ripping up the road
Avenue Veteran
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Avenue Concierge
Joined
11/17/09
Messages
26,083
Location
The valley of the sun
Oh honey, it will and can go away, it make take weeks, months ...with proper housing. Which you are doing, this cream is amazing, I say try it! I'm using it on Lemondrop right now, since shes crippled and her hocks get like that..it will eventually callous but may need constant checking. Lemmie heals, but, it eventually returns,
20200204_131019.jpg
Due to Lemmie being on tile floor, She does fly, kinda,it wears on her. She does sleep on a soft rope perch. Which elevates it during the night..your vet can prescribe it for you. :hug8:
 

Brittany0208

Rollerblading along the road
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
4/8/18
Messages
2,877
Oh honey, it will and can go away, it make take weeks, months ...with proper housing. Which you are doing, this cream is amazing, I say try it! I'm using it on Lemondrop right now, since shes crippled and her hocks get like that..it will eventually callous but may need constant checking. Lemmie heals, but, it eventually returns,
View attachment 327408
Due to Lemmie being on tile floor, She does fly, kinda,it wears on her. She does sleep on a soft rope perch. Which elevates it during the night..your vet can prescribe it for you. :hug8:
This is what I've been using on Java for over a year and it has made a huge difference along with Bag Balm and DMSO. He doesn't seem to be in pain, and the vet and I have wrapped his hock several times just for him to rip it off.
 

Hankmacaw

Cruising the avenue
Avenue Veteran
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Avenue Concierge
Joined
10/18/09
Messages
14,164
Location
Arizona
Real Name
Mary Lynn Skinner
I have had a chronic callus on my heel for three years now and I have tried all of those except the silver sulfadine and padding and really soft socks, but the callus, if left alone for a few days comes back and hurts like heck.

Jasper, because she is crippled by her arthritis, always has at least one little red spot on her feet. I have to keep an eye on them and make sure I doctor those red spots right away.
 

Brittany0208

Rollerblading along the road
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
4/8/18
Messages
2,877
I have had a chronic callus on my heel for three years now and I have tried all of those except the silver sulfadine and padding and really soft socks, but the callus, if left alone for a few days comes back and hurts like heck.

Jasper, because she is crippled by her arthritis, always has at least one little red spot on her feet. I have to keep an eye on them and make sure I doctor those red spots right away.
Lately, Java's foot has been redder than usual, so I make it a priority to at least pick him up once a day to check it. Needless to say, he always finds an itch to scratch whenever I have to trim his nails or tend to his foot :rolleyes:
 

Hawk12237

Biking along the boulevard
Celebirdy of the Month
Joined
3/5/19
Messages
5,106
Location
Frankenmuth, Michigan
Real Name
Michael
Lately, Java's foot has been redder than usual, so I make it a priority to at least pick him up once a day to check it. Needless to say, he always finds an itch to scratch whenever I have to trim his nails or tend to his foot :rolleyes:
I have always use activated charcoal and warm water.
Make into a paste, apply to area. Very effective. I get this bumble foot in chickens now and then.
Sometimes the bumble foot is like staph infection. Bacteria actually. Treated with antibiotics such as" penicillin, erythromycin, lincomycin, and spectinomycin.”
It's caused by gram-positive cocci of the genus Staphylococcus. S aureus and other species are ubiquitous in the environment and are part of the normal flora of the skin and other mucous membranes.
There are two major types of staphylococcosis: systemic infection and localized lesions. Septicemia and gangrenous dermatitis are examples of systemic staphylococcal infections. The most common form of staphylococcosis, however, is localized lesions.
Examples include arthritis, tenosynovitis, osteomyelitis, and omphalitis. Because wounds are the primary route by which Staphylococcus can enter the body, it is important to reduce all potential sources of injury to the bird.
Antimicrobial treatment is more successful for systemic than it is localized infection. But effective.
 

Brittany0208

Rollerblading along the road
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
4/8/18
Messages
2,877
I have always use activated charcoal and warm water.
Make into a paste, apply to area. Very effective. I get this bumble foot in chickens now and then.
Sometimes the bumble foot is like staph infection. Bacteria actually. Treated with antibiotics such as" penicillin, erythromycin, lincomycin, and spectinomycin.”
It's caused by gram-positive cocci of the genus Staphylococcus. S aureus and other species are ubiquitous in the environment and are part of the normal flora of the skin and other mucous membranes.
There are two major types of staphylococcosis: systemic infection and localized lesions. Septicemia and gangrenous dermatitis are examples of systemic staphylococcal infections. The most common form of staphylococcosis, however, is localized lesions.
Examples include arthritis, tenosynovitis, osteomyelitis, and omphalitis. Because wounds are the primary route by which Staphylococcus can enter the body, it is important to reduce all potential sources of injury to the bird.
Antimicrobial treatment is more successful for systemic than it is localized infection. But effective.
Activated charcoal and water? I'll definitely give it a shot. Is there a particular brand of activated charcoal I should use? He's overdue for a vet visit, so I'll be taking him soon. I will point out just in case you aren't aware of his disability, he only has one leg. In his past, he was an aviary breeder and attacked by a raccoon. The attack left him with feather damage in his wing and left his remaining leg with tendon entrapment, so he's unable to extend his leg at all or use his small back toe. Because he cannot walk or fly, his foot is always red and tender looking. Despite this, I'm willing to go through any lengths to make him comfortable and take away any pain he may be experiencing. Do you think the activated charcoal paste will be as effective even though all of his weight is on his foot?
Also, whoever did his amputation, removed quite a bit more than protocol, according to his vet, because his stump doesn't even reach the floor when he's placed on a flat surface. All of his weight is on his hock.
 

Hawk12237

Biking along the boulevard
Celebirdy of the Month
Joined
3/5/19
Messages
5,106
Location
Frankenmuth, Michigan
Real Name
Michael
Activated charcoal and water? I'll definitely give it a shot. Is there a particular brand of activated charcoal I should use? He's overdue for a vet visit, so I'll be taking him soon. I will point out just in case you aren't aware of his disability, he only has one leg. In his past, he was an aviary breeder and attacked by a raccoon. The attack left him with feather damage in his wing and left his remaining leg with tendon entrapment, so he's unable to extend his leg at all or use his small back toe. Because he cannot walk or fly, his foot is always red and tender looking. Despite this, I'm willing to go through any lengths to make him comfortable and take away any pain he may be experiencing. Do you think the activated charcoal paste will be as effective even though all of his weight is on his foot?
Also, whoever did his amputation, removed quite a bit more than protocol, according to his vet, because his stump doesn't even reach the floor when he's placed on a flat surface. All of his weight is on his hock.
Any activated charcoal which is sold just about anywhere there is a pharmacy, over the counter.
TSC farm store has one especially made for birds, or chickens, geese, fowl...should work just as good on parrot.
Actually I want to make note of something here, after you reposted letting me know he was disabled with one leg....this sounds more now of a pressure sore, Avascular necrosis , caused by pressure because of lameness of leg. Your bird is placing all its weight on that area.
So, will activated charcoal work on pressure
sore? That I couldn't say. It can't hurt. It will pull any infection out. Good stuff.
But truthfully, need to private the pressure off that area somehow.
 

Brittany0208

Rollerblading along the road
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
4/8/18
Messages
2,877
Any activated charcoal which is sold just about anywhere there is a pharmacy, over the counter.
TSC farm store has one especially made for birds, or chickens, geese, fowl...should work just as good on parrot.
Actually I want to make note of something here, after you reposted letting me know he was disabled with one leg....this sounds more now of a pressure sore, Avascular necrosis , caused by pressure because of lameness of leg. Your bird is placing all its weight on that area.
So, will activated charcoal work on pressure
sore? That I couldn't say. It can't hurt. It will pull any infection out. Good stuff.
But truthfully, need to private the pressure off that area somehow.
I've padded his entire cage and try to keep him as warm as possible along with a varied diet and topical ointments on his foot. I'm also working with his vet to get a prosthetic made for him, I just haven't been able to get to the veterinary college that's 3 hours away where they have the 3d printer that they need. That's my ultimate goal for him: getting him fitted for that prosthetic.
 

JLcribber

@cockatoojohn
Vendor
Avenue Veteran
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Shutterbugs' Best
Avenue Concierge
Joined
10/16/09
Messages
22,538
Location
Alberta, Canada
Real Name
John
After many months of medicine and adjustments, this is how his foot looks currently and for most of the time. Personally, I don't believe it'll ever completely heal given his disability, but will it always be inflamed, or will it eventually callous? I can't imagine it feeling good. It looks tender. This is the only picture I could get since he started squirming.
Because he is handicapped he is basically forced to use those areas for things they aren't intended for like walking on your elbows. So its a chronic issue that you can improve as you've done but it is what it is. Having something soft under foot at all times is important obviously.
 

Mockinbirdiva

Cruising the avenue
Avenue Veteran
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
11/20/09
Messages
10,687
Location
South Carolina
Real Name
Andrea
After many months of medicine and adjustments, this is how his foot looks currently and for most of the time. Personally, I don't believe it'll ever completely heal given his disability, but will it always be inflamed, or will it eventually callous? I can't imagine it feeling good. It looks tender. This is the only picture I could get since he started squirming.
View attachment 327399

He was happy to get back on his cushion.
View attachment 327400

View attachment 327401

OMG... Java... I just love you! That face!!!!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top