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Clever lovebirds out of cage at night

Karaya

Sitting on the front steps
Joined
7/16/20
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15
Hello everybody!
I have 2 lovebirds, I got them about a month ago and they are still not tamed, but we’re working on it.
Most of the day they spent out of cage on their bird stand playing. The problem is when it comes to night time. They love their play area so much that they don’t want to go back to the cage.
I tried leaving treats in the cage, it worked for 5 days then my birds showed me how clever they are.
Now when I put treats in the cage one is going in and the other one stays out. After that the Other one comes and they keep taking turns until treats are finished. Basically one is always outside of cage while the second one is eating. When I get close to cage it goes out of it and back on top of play stand.
What am I supposed to do? I know it’s not safe for them to sleep outside of the cage.
 

Ali

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Maybe start trying an hour earlier so you don't stress about getting them in by a certain time as much? Also, try target training to get them back. Get them in the cage with target training, close the door, and then offer a treat through the bars. That way, they will eventually get the idea.

That is about all I can offer!

How big is the cage? Could you post a picture of the setup?

Ali
 

BirdLady13

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I agree with @Ali - you should start the process of corralling them sooner rather than later. There's nothing more frustrating than trying to wrangle a bird when you're losing patience because you're tired or running late, etc.
Is it possible their cage is too small for them to share? Birds typically enjoy the freedom of being outside of their cage, but this is going to be even more so true if their living quarters are a bit too cramped.
It sounds silly but you could wiggle your fingers through the cage bars to entice them to go in and play with the moving "toy". If they're territorial they may want to bite your fingers rather than play with them, but I suppose that would still serve the purpose of getting them into the cage.
I'm not sure what you're using as a treat, but maybe put the treats in more than 1 spot in the cage. For example, you could put millet in a treat holder, and spinach in a bowl on the opposite side of the cage.
You could make a point of putting new (inexpensive) toys inside the cage to peak their interest.
Some birds feel like it's a punishment to be put back in their cage, so you should try to do things that will make it seem like it's their decision.
 
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Karaya

Sitting on the front steps
Joined
7/16/20
Messages
15
Maybe start trying an hour earlier so you don't stress about getting them in by a certain time as much? Also, try target training to get them back. Get them in the cage with target training, close the door, and then offer a treat through the bars. That way, they will eventually get the idea.

That is about all I can offer!

How big is the cage? Could you post a picture of the setup?

Ali
Maybe start trying an hour earlier so you don't stress about getting them in by a certain time as much? Also, try target training to get them back. Get them in the cage with target training, close the door, and then offer a treat through the bars. That way, they will eventually get the idea.

That is about all I can offer!

How big is the cage? Could you post a picture of the setup?

Ali
I tried target training but my lovebirds are still scared when I hold any stick in my hand. I tried teaching them steping up but same thing happened. I put training sticks near their play area so they can get used to them, it’s all good until I take it tiny hand.
Here is the photo of the cage when I first got it few weeks ago. Currently inside I have 2 wooden perches (sticks from the outside, baked etc.), 1 rope perch, 2 swings, 2 hanging toys, food dish and water dish.
 

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Karaya

Sitting on the front steps
Joined
7/16/20
Messages
15
I agree with @Ali - you should start the process of corralling them sooner rather than later. There's nothing more frustrating than trying to wrangle a bird when you're losing patience because you're tired or running late, etc.
Is it possible their cage is too small for them to share? Birds typically enjoy the freedom of being outside of their cage, but this is going to be even more so true if their living quarters are a bit too cramped.
It sounds silly but you could wiggle your fingers through the cage bars to entice them to go in and play with the moving "toy". If they're territorial they may want to bite your fingers rather than play with them, but I suppose that would still serve the purpose of getting them into the cage.
I'm not sure what you're using as a treat, but maybe put the treats in more than 1 spot in the cage. For example, you could put millet in a treat holder, and spinach in a bowl on the opposite side of the cage.
You could make a point of putting new (inexpensive) toys inside the cage to peak their interest.
Some birds feel like it's a punishment to be put back in their cage, so you should try to do things that will make it seem like it's their decision.
The cage might not be the biggest but I only want to use it when it's their bed time. I made lovely play stand for them so they can hang out there all day long.
They are scared of my hand and fingers so I don’t know if it’s gonna work but definitely I’m gonna try it!
As a treat I’m using millet and some sunflower seeds, they love them.
The problem is getting two birds in the cage at the same time:lol:
I have one more smaller cage, I was thinking about separating the birds for night time if nothing else is going to work out but I don’t know if it’s good for them.
 

Kiwi & Co.

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Even if it’s only for sleeping?
Yes, they would probably be happier going into a large cage.

Also, if you only offer their main food in the cage (not outside), they will want to be in the cage more.
 

Karaya

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I
Yes, they would probably be happier going into a large cage.

Also, if you only offer their main food in the cage (not outside), they will want to be in the cage more.
I only offer food inside cage. Only sometimes I give them treats outside of the cage.
 

Zara

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A larger cage would be nice but if this is only a sleep cage, it is not the worst. A would remove that green circle swing, but I love the other one.

You can also start removing access to (out of cage) food before bedtime so that when they are hungry, they are more inclined to go in.

Cute birds - Two beautiful hybrids :)
 
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