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AGGRESSIVE

Fiveboy

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Hi today we learned how to sex the birds by feeling their pelvic bones. Once we determined which birds might make a breeding pair we introduced two to each other. One of them is historically aggressive (to the point of having killed a previous cage mate). Again he was, extremely aggressive (territorial as he has the cage to himself?). We tried this with two different birds and both times removed them for their safety.

So the question becomes: Is there a way to calm this male down (his name is Peckerhead) so a female can share his cage?

TIA
 

Shezbug

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I’d say he would rather pick/find his own partner and I personally can’t say I blame him.
Sorry if I’ve misunderstood but it kinda sounds like humans have decided that two birds should be together and I don’t believe that’s how things work as far as the birds are concerned.
 

Fiveboy

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Thanks. I get that. So arranged marriages are not the thing. But.... if I put Peckerhead in with the birds in the flock cage - I guarantee he will just terrorize everyone there.
Or am I wrong and perhaps he will initially - but then calm down? My concern is he might commit birdicide before I can intervene. He's a once convicted felon as is.
 

Zara

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Personally, I would keep this bird in his own cage alone. If he is not happy with a cagemate, then don´t give him one, especially as he has already killed in the past.
This is why only bonded birds can be housed together. You can´t just force two birds in the same cage.
Be sure that this bird has an amplious cage in which he can fly inside, daily flight time, toys and allow him plenty of foraging activities daily. Also be sure he´s eating a balnced diet, so veggies, maybe some pellets, some good quality seed. Not too many sunflower seeds. All of these things will make him happier. He may still be cage territorial, but at least his needs will be more fullfilled.

You say you have a flock cage? An aviary? that is the best way to find pairs, by letting them choose their mate. Then you can move them to their own flight cage.

Maybe in a few months time (if you made these changes) if he shows less ¨aggression¨, he will be able to go into the flock and find a mate.
 

Hankmacaw

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A story from the sanctuary that I volunteered at. We had a section of cages called "Murderer's Row". There were eight cockatoos in those cages , mostly sulfur crested, and every one of them had killed one mate and some two mates. They had been sent to the sanctuary by breeders who could not tolerate those losses

Sometimes there are birds that just are not right in the head.
 

Hankmacaw

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Humans too!
Yes, one of my grandsons is a paranoid schizophrenic with idiologies of violence. He is totally insane, he killed his mother and can never, ever live outside an institution. So I know what insane is. Some people are called insane just because they don't have the same beliefs or morals as others or you might not approve or agree with them but there are some that are totally insane. Just like some birds.
 

Fiveboy

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Personally, I would keep this bird in his own cage alone. If he is not happy with a cagemate, then don´t give him one, especially as he has already killed in the past.
This is why only bonded birds can be housed together. You can´t just force two birds in the same cage.
Be sure that this bird has an amplious cage in which he can fly inside, daily flight time, toys and allow him plenty of foraging activities daily. Also be sure he´s eating a balnced diet, so veggies, maybe some pellets, some good quality seed. Not too many sunflower seeds. All of these things will make him happier. He may still be cage territorial, but at least his needs will be more fullfilled.

You say you have a flock cage? An aviary? that is the best way to find pairs, by letting them choose their mate. Then you can move them to their own flight cage.

Maybe in a few months time (if you made these changes) if he shows less ¨aggression¨, he will be able to go into the flock and find a mate.

Hi Zara thanks for the response. YES he has all the correct elements (great diverse food room etc). My birds are super happy and healthy. Hes just a really picky bird. Yes I have a very large cage where the babies are and yes I see them pairing off naturally.

So... we shall see.
 

Hawk12237

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Hi today we learned how to sex the birds by feeling their pelvic bones. Once we determined which birds might make a breeding pair we introduced two to each other. One of them is historically aggressive (to the point of having killed a previous cage mate). Again he was, extremely aggressive (territorial as he has the cage to himself?). We tried this with two different birds and both times removed them for their safety.

So the question becomes: Is there a way to calm this male down (his name is Peckerhead) so a female can share his cage?

TIA
If I may chime in on this.....one mistake your making is introducing a bird in another's cage. That's a huge no no.
unless they actually grew up together or bonded. Introducing two birds should always be on neutral grounds.
Not in each other's cage. In layman's terms....you have one bird in familiar territory, the other bird not. Which one will be highly vulnerable to get hurt?
Birds are protective of their cage, their environment. It becomes familiar territory. Remove one bird from their familiar territory, and place into another unfamiliar environment , an unfamiliar territory with a bird established in its environment and familiar with its territory you'll have problems a good deal of the time. Not always, true, you may get lucky.
To introduce two birds, it should always be done on neutral grounds. Unfamiliar territory for both. Such as a walk in avery, our door avery, even home made avery.
Why?!? Because neither bird has established it as their territory and most of the time will end up sharing it.
I'm no breeder, but I do know bird behavior. Your aggressive bird will harm if you place a bird in his domain.
And their are some birds that believe it or not, are mentally challenge and will never accept a mate or bond with another bird.
I should also point out, if you, or your bird even thinks there's the slightest bit of bondage between you and bird
Then your bird may not accept another mate. Your it's mate.
 
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Fiveboy

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If I may chime in on this.....one mistake your making is introducing a bird in another's cage. That's a huge no no.
unless they actually grew up together or bonded. Introducing two birds should always be on neutral grounds.
Not in each other's cage. In layman's terms....you have one bird in familiar territory, the other bird not. Which one will be highly vulnerable to get hurt?
Birds are protective of their cage, their environment. It becomes familiar territory. Remove one bird from their familiar territory, and place into another unfamiliar environment , an unfamiliar territory with a bird established in its environment and familiar with its territory you'll have problems a good deal of the time. Not always, true, you may get lucky.
To introduce two birds, it should always be done on neutral grounds. Unfamiliar territory for both. Such as a walk in avery, our door avery, even home made avery.
Why?!? Because neither bird has established it as their territory and most of the time will end up sharing it.
I'm no breeder, but I do know bird behavior. Your aggressive bird will harm if you place a bird in his domain.
And their are some birds that believe it or not, are mentally challenge and will never accept a mate or bond with another bird.
I should also point out, if you, or your bird even thinks there's the slightest bit of bondage between you and bird
Then your bird may not accept another mate. Your it's mate.


Glad you did chime in on this (thats why Im here). What you wrote makes sense. Ill give that a try.
 

Greylady1966

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IMO I wouldn't put him in a situation that possible could end up with a death of a another parrot. This is a sore subject for me. There are good breeders out there that care for their birds and are not into breeding for money alone. I've also seen large parrots put into cages that doesn't even give them room to turn around. Yes sometimes parrots will kill each other in the wild but it's usually to defend their chicks or fighting for a mate. In the wild they have the ability to fly instead of fight. Those that kill or mane will be pasted on to someone else or end up in shelters as @Hankmacaw stated. I don't believe it has anything to do with the mental health of the bird but the conditions people expect them to breed or live in. Many people on the forum have parrots that have been physically or mentally abused and have formed a life long bond with them.
 

Hawk12237

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IMO I wouldn't put him in a situation that possible could end up with a death of a another parrot. This is a sore subject for me. There are good breeders out there that care for their birds and are not into breeding for money alone. I've also seen large parrots put into cages that doesn't even give them room to turn around. Yes sometimes parrots will kill each other in the wild but it's usually to defend their chicks or fighting for a mate. In the wild they have the ability to fly instead of fight. Those that kill or mane will be pasted on to someone else or end up in shelters as @Hankmacaw stated. I don't believe it has anything to do with the mental health of the bird but the conditions people expect them to breed or live in. Many people on the forum have parrots that have been physically or mentally abused and have formed a life long bond with them.
I hear ya, and understand exactly where your coming from. Unfortunately with breeders, there is always risks. Something breeders have learned to accept. Even at the cost of losing a bird. I don't like it any more than you do. But remember, without breeders, over half the birds in this forum would not exist.
Even the so called good breeders run into problems with certain pairs of birds not accepting each other...you don't hear about it as even with breeders, they don't discuss it.
The mental state of bird ( the terminology I use)refers to injured birds...( ie. Those with head injuries, strokes, and etc..obtained at a young age like flying into a window for example) they are less likely to breed. They can become aggressive with no fault of their own.
I try not to think about breeders as I'm not exactly for it, as there's so darn many out there that need homes. But have been around those that do breed, and seen how it's done. And respect them...
was recently asked 2 weeks back to take on 4 Blue front amazons , mated pairs. To breed as I have the knowledge of doing so. Many people in area know I am good with parrots.
But I responded with No!! Nope ...nada!!
beautiful birds, but nope!! I won't breed. I get emails from people ( breeders) I never met, they get my info by word of mouth, and I'm contacted at least 4 times a year to breed birds. Not going to happen!!

 

Zara

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Yes sometimes parrots will kill each other in the wild but it's usually to defend their chicks or fighting for a mate.
In captivity, don´t underestimate a lovebird. They will kill another bird in an instant. Maybe because the other is in their cage, or sometimes a squabble gets out of hand. There have been reports of one lovebird killing it´s bonded mate after years together trouble free.

I revert back to what I said before, this male bird needs to be alone in a nice big cage.
Personally, I would keep this bird in his own cage alone.
Be sure that this bird has an amplious cage in which he can fly inside, daily flight time, toys and allow him plenty of foraging activities daily. Also be sure he´s eating a balnced diet, so veggies, maybe some pellets, some good quality seed. Not too many sunflower seeds. All of these things will make him happier. He may still be cage territorial, but at least his needs will be more fullfilled.
If he ever pairs in the future, I would house them in a breeder cage, one with a divider, and separate them at night and when unsupervised for protection.
 

Fiveboy

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Hi All - An update on my aggressive bird Peckerhead. So I took everyone's suggestions and moved her from her own cage (where she was too aggressive) to the flock cage. Lo and Behold.... the other birds surrounded her in a semi circle. It was clear they were all establishing the pecking order. After three days not only was Peckerhead a different calmer and accepted bird..... but she has paired off and is exhibiting all the courtship behaviors with another. So I watched and established that they are really a thing and have put them back in Peckerheads original cage (plenty big for two birds) along with a nesting box. Bingo now they are busy putting nesting material in. What a difference!!

Thanks all.
 
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