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Training and Bonding advice

Discussion in 'Cockatiel Corner' started by stevepoulter, 6/7/18.

  1. Monica

    Monica Biking along the boulevard Celebirdy of the Month Mayor of the Avenue Avenue Spotlight Award Avenue Veteran

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    You start "training" as soon as you are around a bird. The way you move, the way you interact with the bird, the way you don't interact, etc. Merely walking into a room is a training session, whether or not you look at the bird or pay any attention to them. The bird is still learning something.


    The first video is teaching sun conures to station, AKA *NOT* fly onto a human, and being rewarded for it.
     
  2. Shinobi

    Shinobi Jogging around the block

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    Well it seems that your concept of training is different to mine. I believe that training is conducted by instruction through a trainer who passes on theory and information by activities to share and help retain the information to an agreed standard of proficiency, etc, by practice and instruction.
    You on the other hand believe that merely walking into a room is a training session and believe the bird is learning something, whether or not you give them any attention.

    The first video show the sun conures in a cage (except one) being fed through the cage door. Until the keeper walks inside the cage then they all fly over to the other perch. One conure flies onto the keepers shoulder and she lean over to the perch and the conure jumps onto the perch and then they all get fed. I have fed wild birds that have allow me to hand feed them and some have even followed me inside our house. A couple of birds have perch on my hand to be fed. I didn't train them to do this. I think their desire for food outweighed their fear of me.

     
  3. Monica

    Monica Biking along the boulevard Celebirdy of the Month Mayor of the Avenue Avenue Spotlight Award Avenue Veteran

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    The thing is, birds are *always* learning. When some people come home, they immediately rush over to see their birds and interact with them. Birds learn that as soon as human gets home, they get attention! Other humans come home, they shower, they eat, or whatever it is that they need to do first. Once everything is settled, *THEN* the birds come out. The birds learn that they must wait to come out once the human comes home.

    In that sense, yes, it's a training experience. Sure, the birds may not be getting what you define as training, but they are still learning.


    The sun conure that flew onto the shoulder? The conure didn't get rewarded for that. The conure did, however, get rewarded for stepping back onto a perch and staying there. This could fall under both target training (the "target" being the perches - i.e. targeting their feet to the perch) and station training (staying on the perches, not flying onto the human).
     
  4. Mariah Hughes

    Mariah Hughes Meeting neighbors

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    I think your progress is sounds great for 2 months! Especially for having two birds together instead of just one single bird. I had my first cockatiel for almost an entire year before he decided to step up for me, and he was an aviary bird as well and I worked with him every single day! Be patient and keep working with them at their own pace and your work will pay off!
     
  5. Shinobi

    Shinobi Jogging around the block

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    I'm a qualified workplace assessor and have found that people whos "training' consisted of "stand there and pay attention" have a lower knowledge and ability of the work skillset compared to people who received one on one hands on training. It's not about the "always learning experience". It's about the best method of delivering skillsets through training, one on one, hands on training is the best, FACT.

    One on one hands on training delivers a high quality interaction, low stress environment, avoids overstimulation and eliminates many distractions. This allows a trainer to gauge the bird's progress and mastery with the ability to personalise and adapt to the bird's learning ability.



     

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