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The Right Bird for Me? Help!

Atromble

Checking out the neighborhood
Joined
9/13/21
Messages
2
Real Name
Alex Trombley
Hello! This is my first post after years (and I mean years ) of anonymously reading, researching, and plotting for future endeavors into becoming a Parront; though I want to solidify and/or dive into species more deeply. Which bird is right for me?

I have currently waited 7 years to buy a bird. I am currently in college and, in prior years, wanted to allow my life to be fit for a bird, therefore never made the purchase. Ive heard if your not ready for kids, you arent ready for a parrot. I also know too many people put zero thought into getting a bird and are stuck with such a large commitment; this wont happen with me. More years of waiting will come, but I've started to look more into it now that Im older and its a reality that can occur. All in all, I wanted to ask Avian Avenue which bird I should look into/be interested in due to my preferences....(Yes, Birds vary greatly individually. I want personal suggestions from your experiences and knowledge.)


I have/will have no kids, just a wife with a possibility of a dog/cat in a medium to small home. (EDIT: love the idea of an aviary or someway to combat small home-big bird) I have no issue finding as much time as the bird needs for training and bonding time (The more time for them the better tbh, Im an ornithology major) Sounds rude, but I dont mind if the bird isnt good with other people aslong as we bond.

Money is not a limiting factor. Price of bird, food, treats, housing, and vet are expenses I am willing to pay at any cost.

Noise is most definetly expected. I can withstand the loudness though its not preferred. A talking bird is not in my preferences. I dont mind talking and chattering, but I dont think its important to me that a bird does this.

I want to give scritches and having a touch bond with a bird. Cuddles could be nice but again, I understand some birds individually dont like that stuff and thats okay!)

If possible, I like going on nature walks and hikes (In the U.P of Michigan). I think it would be lovely to have my bird go outside with me and go places if adventurous and willing/wanting. (obviously on harness or in carrier depending on bird (just safely in general))

I prefer medium to large parrots. I have thought deeply on Amazons, Macaws, Cockatoos, African Grays, and Eclectus parrots. Are any of these fitting? If so, what sub species?

I worry Macaws are a bit big for my preferences, but conures and such seem too small. I want a life companion. I am 19. The commitment is forming and well built. Any ideas?! Thanks.
 
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GreenThing

Walking the driveway
Joined
5/24/21
Messages
221
Location
South Florida
Real Name
Kat
I brought my first budgie home this summer. I definitely support waiting until you have 1) some degree of control over your living space, 2) a source of income, 3) some predictable rhythm to your work/school/life routine. It sounds like you are in a great position to be researching this now-- especially if you are studying ornithology! I know that for me finding a job and building my resume to the point that I could actually pay rent took 10 years and big graduate school bills after college, but you've probably thought about that.

I like to go about my business without a pet that needs lots and lots of my direct attention (I love giving direct attention, too, but I flit between creative projects and always have something competing for my attention), so I don't think the bigger and more emotionally complex parrots would ever be a good fit for me, but we have a lot of experienced folks who have cared for big birds and can make a case for their favorite!

For bigger birds-- are there any rescues near you? I know you want a life companion, but there are a lot of upsides to an older bird-- less likelihood they will choose another "favorite person" post-hormones, and it sounds like that is important to you. If a relationship is especially what you are looking for, starting with a young bird might not turn out the way you hope.
 

sunnysmom

Ripping up the road
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I think the best thing you can do is try to meet as many of these types of birds as you can. Since you're not planning on getting one for awhile, I suggest volunteering somewhere with birds- a rescue, zoo, Aviary etc. Maybe you can even do an internship somewhere. The best way to decide is to meet some. : )
 

QB1rd

Sprinting down the street
Joined
6/7/21
Messages
554
I don't have any good advice for you, but I wanted to welcome you and wish you well in your search for information and a companion!
 

Shannan

Meeting neighbors
Joined
7/27/21
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62
Real Name
Shannan
I was 16 when I got Walter. I think that when you look for a bird that young (you being 19), you should focus not on a particular species but look for an adventurous bird. You want one that can change with your life.... and change it will. I was lucky as Walter was a very adventurous parrot (African Gray). He adapted to moving, camping, traveling and new people and all of that. I was worried that he wouldn't like by husband when we first met but a shiny new cage and some sunflower seeds and Walter was hooked. I was worried about having small children.... somehow Walter taught the kids to bring him treats (mostly sunflower seeds and Triskets). Now at 38 Walter is really mellow. He is not into the adventures we did when we were young but my life has settled too. He was not the only bird I have had. Some have come and gone to new homes, rainbow bridge or just crossed my path briefly. I enjoyed them immensely but I am glad Walter has been with me through it all. So Good luck with your adventure. Also know that I wanted a bird badly but had convinced myself it wasn't the time and I was not ready. but kind of like children you will never be fully prepared so get as prepared as you can but don't wait for the "perfect" time as it won't happen. Thankfully my father saw things differently and surprised me with Walter. Best gift ever! I bought him ALL the wrong ways but we learned together. And I didn't even have the internet then, nor did I know a single person who owned a parrot.
 

Atromble

Checking out the neighborhood
Joined
9/13/21
Messages
2
Real Name
Alex Trombley
I was 16 when I got Walter. I think that when you look for a bird that young (you being 19), you should focus not on a particular species but look for an adventurous bird. You want one that can change with your life.... and change it will. I was lucky as Walter was a very adventurous parrot (African Gray). He adapted to moving, camping, traveling and new people and all of that. I was worried that he wouldn't like by husband when we first met but a shiny new cage and some sunflower seeds and Walter was hooked. I was worried about having small children.... somehow Walter taught the kids to bring him treats (mostly sunflower seeds and Triskets). Now at 38 Walter is really mellow. He is not into the adventures we did when we were young but my life has settled too. He was not the only bird I have had. Some have come and gone to new homes, rainbow bridge or just crossed my path briefly. I enjoyed them immensely but I am glad Walter has been with me through it all. So Good luck with your adventure. Also know that I wanted a bird badly but had convinced myself it wasn't the time and I was not ready. but kind of like children you will never be fully prepared so get as prepared as you can but don't wait for the "perfect" time as it won't happen. Thankfully my father saw things differently and surprised me with Walter. Best gift ever! I bought him ALL the wrong ways but we learned together. And I didn't even have the internet then, nor did I know a single person who owned a parrot.
I really like this story! Along with other replies, I really think it is important to get out and meet more birds and that it isn't about what species I want, Its about how adventurous while malleable the bird and myself can be. I guess I should've made this post more about what kind of parrots are out there, because I'd like to be more knowledgeable on species and types of birds (especially the ones people will think I'd be interested in). Thank you everyone!
 

Zara

Try to be a rainbow in somebody else´s cloud ❤️
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I guess I should've made this post more about what kind of parrots are out there, because I'd like to be more knowledgeable on species and types of birds
Have a look through Species Speedway
It might help :)
 

flyzipper

Jogging around the block
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Canada
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Steve
Welcome to the forum!

Macaws are a bit big for my preferences
There's a macaw for all but the littlest size preference -- from a 150g Hahn's to 400g Severe and 500g Red-Fronted, all the way up to the 1000g big guys and 1300g Hyacinth.

I think any sufficiently motivated individual can make most situations work, but will comment that you'll likely encounter more challenges with your living accommodations as the size of avian companion increases. People willing to rent to you may be constrained, conflict with disturbed neighbours might increase, and you may need an extra bedroom (and thus, higher rent). Once you're in a position to own your own home, some of these issues begin to disappear. But, if you're nuts (like me), you'll buy an old church to give them more room to fly and that brings a different set of issues :)

if your not ready for kids, you arent ready for a parrot.
That's probably fairly accurate, but one difference I'd highlight is the empathy of others. Neighbours will tolerate a crying newborn more than a noisy bird. When you're trying to build your career and make a good impression, employers are probably more understanding of, "I can't work this Saturday because I need to take care of my kids", than they would be upon hearing, "I can't work this Saturday because I want to go hiking with my bird(s)".

Best wishes on your ornithology studies.
 

Toy

Jogging around the block
Avenue Veteran
Joined
4/14/10
Messages
637
Location
PA
I'd suggest you google "parrot rescues in Michigan". There are several listed. Then go visit a few & see the different species. Visit a few zoos, avaries or a parrot store (one that deals in parrots only). We can all list our favorite species, but in the end you need to be the one to decide what will fit you.

Renting can be an issue due to bird noise. Some people do not deal well with loud noises & any size parrot can be loud.

Where you will land after college is another issue. A job, buying a house, finding a wife/getting married, etc. If it were me I'd try to get those set up first then go for the bird. The more settled the better. Keep in mind you just can't go off on vacation & let your bird home. You will need to find someone, or several someone's, to bird sit you can trust. Boarding is an option, if any are available in your area. Many areas do not board birds nor do they treat birds, so you'll also need to find an avian vet.

Taking a bird hiking...I'd suggest a medium to large parrot. I assume you plan on doing this in warmer months. I have a U2, CAG and a B&G Macaw. If I had to chose one it'd be the B&G Macaw. They are fun loving, curious, love to be involved. Don't let that big beak scare you. It's not the upper beak that's an issue. The majority of their strength is in the lower beak. At best they give you a good pinch, where a smaller beak often breaks the skin.

If you have issues with allergies then a U2 or CAG may not be the way to go, as they are powder down birds. They make a ton of power to coat their feathers & it gets all over everything.

Parrots are not like having a dog or cat. No to a parrot means keep trying until the human gives in. Yes you can train them to do many things, but "no" is not in their vocabulary.

Take your time, keep researching & looking. At 19 you have many years ahead of you. You'll find that perfect match.
 
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