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Sick African grey

Meursault8

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A few months back (late march) my 15 year old African grey parrot suddenly became sluggish and was occasionally hyperventilating and vomiting. Naturally I immediately took him to an avian vet, who started him on antibiotics (marbofloxacin) without any blood testing or much of a real check up. In the days that followed, my bird was throwing up more and developed a black spot on his left foot, which as I’m writing this has spread to both his feet (See attached pictures). We took him to the vet again who this time seemed to think that he had a calcium deficiency, and prescribed him a supplement and the continued antibiotic treatment. 2-3 days later, he started having seizures where he would violently fall from his perch and have spasms at the bottom of his cage while rolling his eyes backward, which begged another visit to the vet. This time, the vet insisted on administering an anesthetic for nothing more than a blood draw, on which everything was allegedly “normal” except for AST levels that weren’t calculated. The vet took this to mean that my bird had liver failure, and prescribed another medication for that. It became clear at this point that he had no idea what he was doing, which was frustrating since he’s reputably the only good avian vet where I’m from. Nevertheless, I administered all medications as indicated.

My bird became blind in the days that followed. His eyes became swollen with some thick discharge coming from them.

To this day, he is still sluggish, still blind, falling from his perch nearly every day and not talking anymore except with an extremely deep and raspy voice. Both his feet also became much darker in color and swollen. This has been the case for the past few months, during which he’s been to two other vets (not avian specialists) who both basically said there’s nothing they can do for him. I tried giving him doxycycline, an antifungal and supplementing him with Lafeber’s bird vitamins daily, all to no avail. I’m at a loss at this point as does not seem to be getting even slightly better, except for the throwing up which stopped a while ago.

I haven’t a clue what he is suffering from and the vets where I’m from don’t seem to either. Please, if you have any thoughts on how I can help him/what this could be, do share them below.
 

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Shannan

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I am not sure where you are located but I would highly suggest you contact the veterinarian colleges even if they are a long way from you. They may be able to look at the results of any of the tests and/or recommend certain tests. You obviously have a vet you do not trust and may be missing a particular piece of the puzzle. I would also consider a journal where you write down what he is eating, weight gain/ loss, and detailed behavior descriptions so that you might find a pattern. My parrot actually has extreme problem with one of the name brand (well regarded foods) and that led to a big decline in his health. Also do some research into the liver concerns as that may be contributing to your problem and there are things you can do to mediate the problems via diet, etc. Good luck and keep us posted.
 

Pixiebeak

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The above advice is excellent in seeking a veterinarian college.

I'm sorry you guys are struggling for answers.
Some things that are possible, the nutritional like low calcium ( didn't they test for?) Low vitamin D. Low vitamin A.
As well as chronic zinc toxicity, or other metal toxicity..symptoms do fit this

But so many things are possible....

Support with warmth i like the sweeter heater as found on Amazon. The smallest size is more than enough, expensive but worth it. Has helped my beyond measure when dealing with sick burds.

Also supportive supplemental feeding of baby bird formula in addition to what he normally eats. Even once a day around 15 ml will help support. Many burds like it and can be encouraged to take from syringe at beak tip, or with a feeding spoon. I found my adults liked it thicker like yogurt thickness but still able to go through syringe.
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Pixiebeak

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Excerpt:
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Know Your Pet
Seizures In Birds
Seizures in Birds
By Gregory Rich, DVM; Rick Axelson, DVM
Seizures are reasonably common in pet birds and often observed in Amazon parrots, African grey parrots, budgies, canaries, cockatiels, finches, and lovebirds.

What causes seizures in birds?
Some disorders leading to seizure may be primary such as tumors, infections (bacterial, Chlamydial, viral, or fungal in origin), heatstroke, vascular events affecting the brain, or trauma (such as flying head-first into a solid object). Secondary disorders include reproductive problems, metabolic disorders, nutritional deficiencies or imbalances, and toxic events. One of the more common causes amongst pet birds is the ingestion of lead or zinc particles, which lead to toxic levels in the bloodstream and subsequent convulsions or seizures. When the cause cannot be determined, the condition is called idiopathic epilepsy or seizures.

"One of the more common causes amongst pet birds is the ingestion of lead or zinc particles...
 
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