• Welcome to Avian Avenue! To view our forum with less advertisments please register with us.
    Memberships are free and it will just take a moment. Click here

Hygiene protocols for the prevention and control of PBFD

JAM

Biking along the boulevard
Avenue Veteran
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Joined
12/2/12
Messages
5,670
Location
Australia
This document is heavy reading and is issued by the Australian Government. As so many species are susceptible to this devastating disease and us Aussies unfortunately have the virus prevalent in our wild flocks it should be something owners are aware of in terms of how to prevent and control and are able to hopefully stop our flocks from ever being at risk from this terrible disease.

http://www.environment.gov.au/syste...-1a9fdcb76642/files/hygiene-protocols-all.pdf

What is PBFD a PDF fact sheet from the Government:
http://www.environment.gov.au/syste...-4c31-9fa8-519dcbc593ca/files/p-c-disease.pdf

More from the government which also lists species under threat that are affected by this too :(
Psittacine Circoviral (beak and feather) Disease

Another link about the disease:
Psittacine Beak and Feather Disease (PBFD) in Birds
 

Maxsmom

Biking along the boulevard
Avenue Veteran
Joined
8/18/12
Messages
6,800
Thank you for sharing. So good to have a better understanding
 
  • Like
Reactions: JAM

JAM

Biking along the boulevard
Avenue Veteran
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Joined
12/2/12
Messages
5,670
Location
Australia
For those of you who who are looking for a more available solution, this article from the makers of F10 has a study on the effectiveness against PBFD and it shows that it can be used at a certain dilution to get rid of the circovirus. :cool:

:: Health & Hygiene :: The Facts...
 

Archiesmom

Biking along the boulevard
Avenue Veteran
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Joined
11/16/09
Messages
9,876
Location
Minnesnowta
Real Name
Natalie
Wow, a very dense, but useful read. I think this is very important for people who are planning on bringing new birds into their home to read. PBFD can spread to your entire flock if you don't take proper measures. Thank you for posting!
 
  • Like
Reactions: JAM

Steve Weir

Meeting neighbors
Joined
11/10/14
Messages
50
Location
Cranbourne East Victoria Australia
Thanks for posting. Another member of this site said my lorikeet may have PBFD. Although I haven't noticed any legions or feather deformations. It's just her beak is chipped. She doesn't display any of the symptoms of PBFD.
 

CheekyBeaks

Rollerblading along the road
Joined
2/20/13
Messages
1,856
Location
QLD, Australia
Real Name
Ann-Marie
Thanks for posting. Another member of this site said my lorikeet may have PBFD. Although I haven't noticed any legions or feather deformations. It's just her beak is chipped. She doesn't display any of the symptoms of PBFD.
Lorikeets can be quite resilient and can 'recover' from PBFDV and not show symptoms but it is likely they continue to be carriers, the only way to know for certain with loris is to have a blood test done.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JAM

Milo

Rollerblading along the road
Avenue Veteran
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
6/30/11
Messages
4,045
Location
IL
Real Name
Jenny
Lorikeets can be quite resilient and can 'recover' from PBFDV and not show symptoms but it is likely they continue to be carriers, the only way to know for certain with loris is to have a blood test done.
Is there something that differentiates lorikeets from the other parrots that can clear the virus and test negative?
 

JAM

Biking along the boulevard
Avenue Veteran
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Joined
12/2/12
Messages
5,670
Location
Australia
I don't think there's been enough research done @Milo to understand why. I would say it would be related to their immune response but why some recover and some don't, still a mystery.
 

Milo

Rollerblading along the road
Avenue Veteran
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
6/30/11
Messages
4,045
Location
IL
Real Name
Jenny
I don't think there's been enough research done @Milo to understand why. I would say it would be related to their immune response but why some recover and some don't, still a mystery.
I'm not asking why some recover and some don't, what I'm asking is if it is specific to lorikeets in that they are clinically normal but continue to shed the virus. That's not the case with other parrots. If a bird is suffering from a latent infection they're potentially not shedding the virus. I guess I'm just confused as to how this was figured out specifically with lorikeets but it doesn't seem to be present in other species. Not argumentative just thinking out loud so to speak.
 

JAM

Biking along the boulevard
Avenue Veteran
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Joined
12/2/12
Messages
5,670
Location
Australia
Nothing to argue about with PBFD I think the more we talk about it and get informed the better for everyone! :)

I am sure it is specific to lorikeets, I will quickly do some research and get back to you.
 

JAM

Biking along the boulevard
Avenue Veteran
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Joined
12/2/12
Messages
5,670
Location
Australia
Here is a bit from this website by Dr Ross Perry who discovered the circovirus:
Tag Archive for 'PBFD circovirus' at PsittacineBeakFeatherDisease.com is about PBFD

It does note that most which have "recovered" have not had proper tests so there is the likelihood it wasn't proper PBFD to start with however the statement does leave open that a few were tested......

"Some birds recover without treatment.

In my experience those species most likely to recover are nestling domestic budgerigars, peachfaced lovebirds and wild and captive bred nestling and fledgling rainbow lorikeets that develop the acute form of the disease. Many of these will grow apparently normal plumage within the first year of life provided they are protected from predators, concurrent disease and fed an adequate diet.

They recover without any special medicine apart from T.L.C. (tender loving care). It takes only one bird with PBFD to make a recovery to show that recovery is possible. I believe I have seen individuals of a variety of species including galah, sulphur crested cockatoo, regent parrot and corellas, both long and short billed. As a scientist I cannot say just on feather changes alone that I can see with my own eyes that a bird definitely has PBFD, I can say that I’m 95% sure or something similar, but unless appropriate confirmatory tests are done on blood, feathers and faeces I can’t be absolutely sure (and nor can anyone else to the best of my knowledge). Such confirmatory tests have not been done on most of the birds I’ve seen recover."

- See more at: Tag Archive for 'PBFD circovirus' at PsittacineBeakFeatherDisease.com is about PBFD
 

CheekyBeaks

Rollerblading along the road
Joined
2/20/13
Messages
1,856
Location
QLD, Australia
Real Name
Ann-Marie
It may have something to do with the fact that PBFDV originated here in Australia and perhaps there is an evolutionary reason behind their resilience to it?
 

Milo

Rollerblading along the road
Avenue Veteran
Avenue Spotlight Award
Joined
6/30/11
Messages
4,045
Location
IL
Real Name
Jenny
Eclectus are also among the most prone to PBFD, I'm not sure of the recovery rate with them. It's also not common at all in new world species, potentially because new world parrots aren't as dusty and it attacks the powder down glands? That's pure speculation on my part (the reason, not that it's not common in new world species). I think it's a pretty weak argument for "spontaneous recovery" if there haven't been any tests to confirm. Granted, there's a reason for the test protocol, but in terms of a scientific approach it seems pretty sketchy
 

JAM

Biking along the boulevard
Avenue Veteran
Celebirdy of the Month
Mayor of the Avenue
Joined
12/2/12
Messages
5,670
Location
Australia
Hmmm interesting thought but lorikeets are one of the preferred low allergen parrots as they have no dust like cockatoos and tiels etc but it may be one of the reasons they aren't as badly affected and can be carriers?
 

Steve Weir

Meeting neighbors
Joined
11/10/14
Messages
50
Location
Cranbourne East Victoria Australia
Lori Lorikeet is looking alot happier today she is jumping around and hanging upside down on the roof of her cage and her perches. I have really become very fond of Lorikeet ownership. Jam I have put a found notice in the local pet stores and vet clinics so we will see if anyone claims her. I am almost certain that she is an aviary escapee. She is not spooked by us but she is by no means tame. What do you reckon?
 
  • Like
Reactions: JAM

LRous

Meeting neighbors
Joined
3/18/15
Messages
34
Location
Brisbane
Real Name
Lori
I couldnt open the links for some reason :( PBFD is such a devastating virus. I think a contributing factor for the virus being so aggressive is So many lorikeets in Australia are fed by the public the wrong thing (bread, seed) and the parents are feeding it to there young which is not only bad for them has no nutritional benefits which would result in a Pretty crappy immune system, leaving the virus dormant in the nest hollow for the next generation.
We can only educate ourselves and others.
I have a couple of dedicated clients that have unwillingly purchased a parrot with PBFD and once a month come for health checks and file/beak and nails with the hope the bird may get better. Just the procedure of having a PBFD client make a booking it had to be the last one of the day because we want to limit the risk of exposing to other birds and equipment has to be soaked in F10 and left over night!

Steve sorry im new to this forum and not familiar with your story. Have you taken her to the vet see if she has a microchip?
 
Top