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  • This forum is for advice about initial treatment given to your injured/sick bird until a qualified avian veterinarian is available.
    THIS IS NOT MEANT TO REPLACE VET CARE

Emergency First Aid Kit.....

Billie Faye

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EMERGENCY INFORMATION


Stay CALM! That is first and foremost when you have an injured bird.
Number of your Avian Vet, Emergency Center and someone to call to transport you if possible

Basic First Aid Kit (taken from:
http://www.birdsnways.com/wisdom/ww2e.htm )
There are some "musts" for your kit. The following are items we suggest for inclusion in a Basic First Aid Kit, with a brief description of their uses.
o Towel - for wrapping and securing your bird
o Scissors - for cutting tape, bandages.....and strings which can wrap on birds toes

o Corn starch/Cayenne pepper (this was NOT in article).
o Hemostats and tweezers - for removing broken blood feathers, and/or splinters
o Plyers, needle nose - for pulling blood feathers or unbending chains and quik links which birds are known to injure themselves with.
o Wire cutters - once again, birds are known to wrap themselves in chain and/or wire.
o Gauze pads - for covering wounds, burns
o Cotton balls - for cleansing
o Q-tips - for cleaning out small wounds, getting stuff out of a bird's mouth or throat.
o Vet wrap (cut into strips and rolled) - for wrapping broken bones, wings, or binding gauze pads to wounds.
o Micropore tape (paper surgical tape) - for holding gauze in place
o Penlight or small flashlight (A head-mounted light is even better.)
o Magnifying glasses or "jewelers loop" - especially necessary for those of us at "that certain age"....but since birds are so small and delicate, a pair of magnifying glasses can come in handy for anyone trying to do detail work.
o Sterile water - for flushing wounds or mixing with food
o Pedialyte (or generic equivalent)- for rehydrating a dehydrated bird. Can be mixed with food. Pedialyte contains sugars and electrolytes which avians quickly lose when dehydrated or sick. Must be discarded within 24 hours of opening since it is a wonderful media for bacteria to grow in. An alternate to Pedialite such as Gastrolyte, Rappolyte powders can be used. These should be mixed with sterile water. Both are available through veterinarians. Pedialite, however, is readily available at any grocery store in the baby food section.
o Hand feeding formula, jars of human baby food such as veggies, cereals or squash. Often sick or injured birds will be too weak to eat on their own for a few days. During this period of time we may find ourselves having to spoon or syringe feed the bird to help keep their strength up.
o Feeding syringes, spoon with bent up sides to facilitate feeding (for above.)
o Pellets/seeds - If your bird needs to stay at the hospital, they may not have the type/kind of food your bird is accustomed to. It is a good idea to have several baggies of fresh seed and/or pellets available to take with you.
o Betadyne or hibitane (chlorhexidine) - as non-irritating disinfectant. Avoid hydrogen peroxide which is caustic to skin
o Aloe Vera - for very minor burns. Many creams and lotions made for humans are toxic to birds, so make sure that you get 100% pure Aloe Vera

Additional Supplies:
For those who are more experienced you may want to add:
o Popscicle sticks - for immobilizing broken legs
o Ophthalmic ointment - for scratched eyes, minor conjunctivitis
o Suturing materials (surgical needles and thread)
o Gelfoam - stops bleeding from flesh wounds. Available from your veterinarian.
o Tegaderm dressing - helps healing for burns and certain open wounds. Encourages granulation (healing/scabbing.)
o Lactated Ringer's solution - used for IV rehydrating of dehydrated avians and flushing wounds.
o Syringes - for injectable medications and irrigation of wounds.


Added from AA members:
Super Clot is also a great thing to have

Tube sock with the foot cut off to restrain an injured bird.

Heating pad to put under one half of a hosptial cage.

Names and numbers of your regular avian vet and the emergency vet.

Readers if you wear them. (You don't want to be running around looking for glasses in an emergency.)
 
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Cynthia & Percy

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thanks for the post BF it is a good reminder:hug8:
 

Cynthia & Percy

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corn starch or Cayenne pepper are to stop bleeding:hug8:
 

Billie Faye

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Cayenne pepper stops the bleeding and helps heal the wound.
:hug8:
 

waterfaller1

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Wow, I had better get busy putting one together. My stuff that I do have is scattered about, and there is much on that list I do not have. Thanks BF!:)
 

Billie Faye

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When a bird is bleeding and you can't get it to stop, Cayenne pepper stops bleeding in seconds...
I have used it on myself also and the healing is unbelievable...doesn't sting me like alcohol:hug8:
 
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suncoast

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Super Clot is also a great thing to have

http://www.trueloveaviary.com/sylasucl7.html



Tube sock with the foot cut off to restrain an injured bird.

Heating pad to put under one half of a hosptial cage.

Names and numbers of your regular avian vet and the emergency vet.

Readers if you wear them. (You don't want to be running around looking for glasses in an emergency.)

Ginger
 

Gen120

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wow, awesome post BF! Thank you so much for this info!:hug8:
 

Nelson & Gang

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Here is the information that I put together for the rescue group I belong to. It also includes emergency evacuation information and holistic substitute information:

I was looking through the forum for Fantastic Feathers & noted that there is no recommendation for a 1st aid kit in case of emergencies. There is a mention in a "topic" back in 2006 in the Parrot Paraphernalia section about it, but it doesn't really have anything specific.

I had previously put together the below which may make a good sticky w/ information on this particular topic ... if interested.


Emergency Bird 1st Aid Kit (When Seconds Count)

Putting together a Bird First Aid Kit so you are prepared to treat a bird emergency when seconds count.

A Bird First Aid Kit does not replace the need for a qualified avian veterinarian. These items are only recommended to assist you in stabalizing your bird in an emergency situation, to assess your injury and contact your avian vet.

· Small box or carry bag to keep all items in

· Styptic Powder to stop toenail/feather bleeding - or small container w/ corn starch or flour

· Latex Gloves (or Nitrile if any caretakers have latex allergy)

· 1 oz. Eye and Skin Wash for flushing eyes or wounds

· 1" x 6 yd. Sterile Gauze Bandage to wrap wounds, vet wrap (can be larger or smaller depending on bird size)

· Scissors for trimming feathers and cutting bandage tape (make sure the scissors are sharp - dull scissors in an emergency is not a good thing)

· Pair of 5" Locking Forceps for removing broken blood feathers

· 2 PVP Iodine Antiseptic Swabs for sterilization

· 2 Antiseptic Towelettes for cleaning wounds and hands

· 2" x 2" Gauze Pads to cover wounds (smaller or larger depending on bird size)

· Cotton Swabs for application of oinment and creams

· 1/2" x 2 1/2 yd. Adhesive Tape to secure bandage, if necessary

· Hand Wipes for personal cleanup

· Bird Emergency Card - listing all of your information, bird information, vet information, emergency center, poision control, etc.

· Avix Soother, or other ointment* for application to small lacerations or open wounds if necessary. *It's important to make sure any ointment used is water based. Whether hot or cold, oil and feathers do not mix. Do not use oil or grease based ointments on a bird for any reason. Oils mat down feathers, decrease their insulation qualities and make a bird susceptible to chills leading to other health problems. Examples of products to avoid include Vaseline, mineral oil, oil based ointments or salves (including some sold in pet stores). Triple antibacterial ointments can be used on areas w/ no feathers; feet, beak, vent, or a plucked area. It should not be used any where on feathered areas.

· Pedialyte (not grape) in case of fluid necessity. *See below*

· Always keep food/pellets handy in case you need an immediate trip to the vet.

· A flashlight.

· A heating pad, which can be used for added warmth if necessary. Heat is immediately necessary in the event of shock or blood loss.

· Extra pair of glasses (if you need to wear them to read or see so you don’t have to spend any time looking for them)


Make sure to check the contents of your First Aid Kit periodically to make sure the contents are not outdated or expired.

Make sure your First Aid Kit is readily handy if you need it in an emergency ~ we keep ours in a box (magnetic on the back) stuck to the side of our refrigerator.


Keep a towel (size dependent on bird size) handy also. If you need to restrain your bird to easier assess the emergency issue, you won't have to hunt for one. We keep one in the cabinet beside the fridge for this reason. Grab the kit, grab the towel. A tube sock w/ the end cut-off can be an excellent way to temporarily stabilize mobility of your bird in the case of a wing injury. M2Mom has often mentioned the importance of having a pillow case(s) handy for an immediate evacuation situation ~ this can just as easily be kept in the same location as your emergency kit & towel if needed.

Keep a number for a neighbor in case you need quick help from someone (This can be added to your emergency card). If you need to assess an emergency and restrain your bird, you may not be able to do this alone. Having someone you can call quickly can be very beneficial, as well as having someone who can drive you if necessary. I also recommend having these numbers programmed as speed dial on your phone for easier accessibility during an emergency.

If you have an emergency ... keep calm. Do not panic. Think about your bird, what it needs, and panic later.


*Avoid the grape flavored pedialyte ...
Article Here
I've only used the regular & orange flavor in the past @ the recommendation of the vet and w/out any difficulty.


Knowledge of Avian CPR & Rescue Breathing* can be beneficial in an emergency situation. You should review the above link w/ information provided by WingWise and also keep it handy w/ your emergency kit. *Injury can occur if the techniques are not properly done, but injury to your bird is better than a dead bird. Contact your avian vet immediately after any breathing techniques are administered or required.

Herbal Additions* can be substituted or included in your kit as follows:

- Echinacea & astragalus (both are immune system boosters). Echinacea is cooling and astragalus is warming. Both can help with respiratory and digestive disorders.

- Slippery elm and marshmallow (both are cooling and soothing to respiratory and digestive problems)

- Garlic (skin infections, some viruses, strep, worms, respiratory ailments, blood thinning, colic, kidney problems), dandelion (kidney function, swelling, indigestion or digestive disorders, diarrhea, eye problems), milk thistle (liver function), St. John’s wort (nerve conditions, anxiety, unrest), golden seal and/or orgon grape (commonly used as an eyewash or mouthwash, but also aids in congestion, healing wounds, inflamed mucous membranes, fungal infections, yeast infections and digestive aid). 50/50 mix of goldenseal and garlic powder for antiseptic use on clean wounds

- Probiotics (aids in maintaining 'normal' levels of micro-organisms, especially during antibiotic therapy)

- Pot Marigold (Calendula) cream/ointment for cuts and scrapes

- Chickweed cream for insect stings and burns (Aloe vera mixed w/ St. John’s Wort can also be used for burns)

- Black ointment to draw splinters

- Tea Tree oil in a carrier oil for antiseptic/antifungal use

- Homeopathic Ledum for puncture wounds

- Saline solution

*Many avian veterinarians have knowledge and recommendations for holistic/herbal remedies and usages. You should not give any herbal remedies to your bird w/out first checking w/ your avian vet to determine when, how much and how often herbal additions should be given to your bird, based on size/weight and other health related factors.
 

Trice

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Valueable information. Thanks BF!
 

Thugluvgrl187

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Great info!! Thanks. I think this will definitely come in handy.
 

Ariahna

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I was one of those people who didn't think a first aid kit was necessary....I like two miles away from the vet and I am super careful with the birds. Well after Max's recent issues after returning from the vet I now understand why EVERYONE that keeps birds should have a first aid kit. I would add that having a piece of paper with dosage and mixing instructions as well as each of your bird's weight in grams is helpful too. I can attest that you can't always think straight when you see blood coming from one of these little guys.
 

Annamacaw

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I keep one in the house and I have a modified 1st Aid box ready to take in the car for the trip to the Vet.... that one includes a towel and pillowcases.
 

44chicken

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What a GREAT thread and such useful list info! I don;t know why I don't have a kit already made up...I have a people emergency kit but I will be building this one tomorrow! Thanks!
 

WingedVictory

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This is a great list.

I would add cayenne pepper to stop bleeding. GSE to purify water and be used, 3 drops per cup, of water for a wound rinse. Bragg brand ACV for digestion and minor antibiotic use. A bottle of aloe-detox, Lilly of the Valley brand. 10 ea small syringes 1/2 ml and 1ml, for medication. Maybe 25 pipettes for would rinse and possible medication. People with many birds should have an incubator and oxygen supply.
 

tozie12

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where to go for availing those kits. any ideas and help would be appreciated here


i assembled my own. i got a plastic box at walmart and aquired most of the supplies from first aid section of walmart or my local pharmacy.

the hemostats were the most difficult to locate, no one seemed to have them. i found them at Harbor Freight, of all places! apparently they are often used by mechanics to bleed break systems.

i also added Wound Seal to my box. it stops bleeding almost instantly without using the body's natural clotting systems. it was designed with humans on blood thinners in mind. but i have used it on myself as well as my dog and it worked wonderful!
 
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