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Do conures get along with cockatiels?

macaronish

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Thinking of getting a second bird as I currently only have a single cockatiel and I'm worried she gets lonely since birds are such social creatures, I spend a lot of time with her but I'm not a parrot. I was thinking of getting her a friend but I don't Want to fall into the trap of getting a parrot for my parrot, so I've been researching what species I'd genuinely want and I'm in love with GCC. However I'm not sure if they'd get on - my cockatiel is a gentle, timid birdie who is very quiet and shy in temperament, she's 4yo and has apparently always been like that. Would a conure bully her or be too much for her?
 

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Generally I would not suggest a cockatiel and conure to be buddies. Something to consider is that the dust from cockatiels can cause respiratory issues for some species, especially New World parrots such as macaws and conures. For health reasons I would not mix them.
 

macaronish

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Generally I would not suggest a cockatiel and conure to be buddies. Something to consider is that the dust from cockatiels can cause respiratory issues for some species, especially New World parrots such as macaws and conures. For health reasons I would not mix them.
What parrot should I look into apart from another cockatiel?
 

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Another conure species might be a good match.
 

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Tiels generally get a long best with cockatiels. I have also heard that they do well with bourkes as they have similar temperaments.
 

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With living in a dorm, are you on campus?

If so, I’d really recommend against getting another bird. Especially since the cage yours is in is on the smaller side as is, and you’ve mentioned your space being limited.
 

macaronish

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With living in a dorm, are you on campus?

If so, I’d really recommend against getting another bird. Especially since the cage yours is in is on the smaller side as is, and you’ve mentioned your space being limited.
Next academic year I'm going to be in an apartment, so this wouldn't be until September when I have the space and money for a flight cage
 

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Another conure species might be a good match.
Whoops, I thought you had a conure and we’re looking for a friend for him! Then I would not recommend conures. I would look into Australian grass parrots. Perhaps a kakariki?
 

macaronish

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Whoops, I thought you had a conure and we’re looking for a friend for him! Then I would not recommend conures. I would look into Australian grass parrots. Perhaps a kakariki?
Ooh I will research them, I don't know anything about Kakarikis. Maybe another cockatiel is my best shot lol. I will get a conure once I have the space for a bird room so I can keep multiple species separate :)
 

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you have an exceptional lovely bond with her ! I wouldn't mess that up by bringing in another bird.

Wait till you are all squared away and can get the green cheek conure you realky want.
 

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Ooh I will research them, I don't know anything about Kakarikis. Maybe another cockatiel is my best shot lol. I will get a conure once I have the space for a bird room so I can keep multiple species separate :)
Even when kept separately the conure could still develop Pulmonary Hyper Sensitivity.

This thread will help you understand more. :)
Thread
 

macaronish

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you have an exceptional lovely bond with her ! I wouldn't mess that up by bringing in another bird.

Wait till you are all squared away and can get the green cheek conure you realky want.
I've read a lot about how it's "cruel" to keep a solitary bird, is this not the case? Honestly I just want what's best for her as I love her so much
 

macaronish

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Even when kept separately the conure could still develop Pulmonary Hyper Sensitivity.

This thread will help you understand more. :)
Thread
Hmm maybe I'll just commit to "dusty" species from now on? I do absolutely love African greys as well, they're my dream bird for once I can get an aviary. The health of my companions is of the upmost importance and I wouldn't want to risk it even if the risk is small. Thanks for the info!
 

tka

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I would caution you against taking on another bird at this time.

Be very aware that pet-friendly apartments can be hard to find. Even if you do find a landlord willing to rent to someone with one bird, they may baulk at two. Unfortunately many student apartments are kind of crappy and you probably won't luck out and find a clean, well maintained, well ventilated, sufficiently spacious AND bird-friendly apartment. I lived in some pretty grim places as an undergraduate and postgraduate student: mould, pests, dodgy housemates, landlords who didn't look after the property...you name it.

Cockatiels can easily live into their teens and beyond. You need to consider what your life might look like in 10, 15 and even 25 years time. Do you want to study or work abroad? What career plans do you have? Do you want to be in a relationship or start a family?

As a student, you are in a period of your life when you can expect many changes: your academic workload is going to increase as you take more advanced courses, you may need to take on part-time work to fund your studies, you may need to complete internships or work placements to gain experience in your chosen field. You may want to study or work abroad. You may need to complete postgraduate degrees or further training in order to work in your chosen area. You may need to travel for training, placements, jobs and so on. You will almost certainly want to make human friends and spend time with them.

In addition, bird care can be expensive. There's the day to day costs of food, toys, and so on - but there can also be big, unexpected bills. Even a healthy bird can have an accident or suddenly fall ill despite our care. Vet bills can be serious money.

Doing all this with one bird is hard but it's far cheaper to board one bird at a vet or with a petsitter than two birds. It's easier to persuade a family member to temporarily care for one bird rather than two (who, in the worst case scenario, do not get on and cannot be out of their cages together). It's less expensive to treat one sick bird rather than two sick birds. It's easier to find room for one spacious flight cage in a cramped apartment than to find room for two. And so on.

Yes, it would be ideal if your tiel could have a companion. But you also have to think about whether you can truly care for two birds through what may be a very unstable period of your life. Personally my advice is to focus on giving your current bird a fulfilling and enriched life: try to teach her to play independently, forage and train rather than snuggle on you. She will need to learn how to entertain herself on days when you can't spend all your time with her, and generally have the resilience to take changes in her stride.
 

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I definitely think all birds should be kept with other birds, preferably a same species friend.

Do you know if she has ever been in contact with other birds, and how she reacted to them? Birds who have been kept as a single bird their whole lives can have trouble adjusting to living with another bird. If she has always been alone, she may be okay on her own. I think she would benefit from a friend, but if your resources like space are already a bit stretched, perhaps it is wisest to wait with adding a friend.

She is gorgeous!!
 

macaronish

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I would caution you against taking on another bird at this time.

Be very aware that pet-friendly apartments can be hard to find. Even if you do find a landlord willing to rent to someone with one bird, they may baulk at two. Unfortunately many student apartments are kind of crappy and you probably won't luck out and find a clean, well maintained, well ventilated, sufficiently spacious AND bird-friendly apartment. I lived in some pretty grim places as an undergraduate and postgraduate student: mould, pests, dodgy housemates, landlords who didn't look after the property...you name it.

Cockatiels can easily live into their teens and beyond. You need to consider what your life might look like in 10, 15 and even 25 years time. Do you want to study or work abroad? What career plans do you have? Do you want to be in a relationship or start a family?

As a student, you are in a period of your life when you can expect many changes: your academic workload is going to increase as you take more advanced courses, you may need to take on part-time work to fund your studies, you may need to complete internships or work placements to gain experience in your chosen field. You may want to study or work abroad. You may need to complete postgraduate degrees or further training in order to work in your chosen area. You may need to travel for training, placements, jobs and so on. You will almost certainly want to make human friends and spend time with them.

In addition, bird care can be expensive. There's the day to day costs of food, toys, and so on - but there can also be big, unexpected bills. Even a healthy bird can have an accident or suddenly fall ill despite our care. Vet bills can be serious money.

Doing all this with one bird is hard but it's far cheaper to board one bird at a vet or with a petsitter than two birds. It's easier to persuade a family member to temporarily care for one bird rather than two (who, in the worst case scenario, do not get on and cannot be out of their cages together). It's less expensive to treat one sick bird rather than two sick birds. It's easier to find room for one spacious flight cage in a cramped apartment than to find room for ti wo. And so on.

Yes, it would be ideal if your tiel could have a companion. But you also have to think about whether you can truly care for two birds through what may be a very unstable period of your life. Personally my advice is to focus on giving your current bird a fulfilling and enriched life: try to teach her to play independently, forage and train rather than snuggle on you. She will need to learn how to entertain herself on days when you can't spend all your time with her, and generally have the resilience to take changes in her stride.
Thankfully I already found a pet friendly apartment for next year as my mom knows someone who knows a landlord and they are fine with cockatiels. So that won't be an issue. It was a big factor in me being able to get macaroni in the first place

I think you're right that the solution to my bird being lonely isn't another bird... I just want her to be as happy and content as possible but I do feel like such an inadequate owner at times as I'm unable to provide her with absolutely everything she needs for an ideal life. I see bird owners with much bigger cages and large flocks and wonder if she'd be better off with someone else but the situation I took her away from wasn't good either... her diet was awful and her cage was absolutely tiny.
 

tka

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I lived in two different cities and in seven different halls of residence, houseshares and flats between starting my BA and graduating with my PhD :) It's great that you have an apartment for next year, but remember that it's only for a relatively short period. Unfortunately landlords can change their minds: one AA member had to rehome several beloved flock members after her landlady suddenly decided that she wasn't happy with the birds after years of being okay with them. It was enormously distressing and disruptive for all of them.

Ultimately, none of our birds are living with the space and companionship they would have in the wild. We all make compromises. It's a question of trying to make the best compromises we can. You've done well to improve her life - she has more space, a better diet, toys and, most importantly of all, is cared for by someone who is willing to learn and who wants to provide her with what she needs to be happy.

It's important to look at this in the long term: you and she will be most happy in the years to come if you don't get overwhelmed with bird care, are able to focus on your university work, and do what you need to do to be happy and fulfilled yourself. Don't put yourself in a position where you miss out on opportunities that you would resent missing out on, whether these are professional, travel, relationships and so on. Don't miss out on life experiences that will enrich you. You need to consider your needs too, and how you would feel if these went unmet. At this stage in your life, a small flock of birds would mean that your life would become much more complicated and you would miss out on things. As I said, it's doable to board one bird or to persuade someone to care for them - this gets harder with each addition.
 

macaronish

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I lived in two different cities and in seven different halls of residence, houseshares and flats between starting my BA and graduating with my PhD :) It's great that you have an apartment for next year, but remember that it's only for a relatively short period. Unfortunately landlords can change their minds: one AA member had to rehome several beloved flock members after her landlady suddenly decided that she wasn't happy with the birds after years of being okay with them. It was enormously distressing and disruptive for all of them.

Ultimately, none of our birds are living with the space and companionship they would have in the wild. We all make compromises. It's a question of trying to make the best compromises we can. You've done well to improve her life - she has more space, a better diet, toys and, most importantly of all, is cared for by someone who is willing to learn and who wants to provide her with what she needs to be happy.

It's important to look at this in the long term: you and she will be most happy in the years to come if you don't get overwhelmed with bird care, are able to focus on your university work, and do what you need to do to be happy and fulfilled yourself. Don't put yourself in a position where you miss out on opportunities that you would resent missing out on, whether these are professional, travel, relationships and so on. Don't miss out on life experiences that will enrich you. You need to consider your needs too, and how you would feel if these went unmet. At this stage in your life, a small flock of birds would mean that your life would become much more complicated and you would miss out on things. As I said, it's doable to board one bird or to persuade someone to care for them - this gets harder with each addition.
Thank you for your advice and guidance! I needed to hear it :)

It's been wonderful and incredibly fulfilling looking after my bird and I'm determined to provide her with the best life I can, for life. But at this moment in time and probably for the next 5-10 years I can only make that commitment to one bird, I think, and that's OK. I've wanted parrots since I was 12 so I can always wait to get more in the future since my love of birds isn't going anywhere
 
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