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Can you share you bunny experiences with me?

Loveofbird

Walking the driveway
Joined
12/2/20
Messages
187
Hi I am interested in a bunny companion but that won't be until the next year or two. I'm just trying to get a feel for them right now.

Now I know the care and everything like always have hay in their cage, pellets and veggies, fruits only as treats, toys for mental stimulation and keeping their teeth down, vets who know how to treat rabbits. Not the small pet stores cages for them, out of cage time, wire chewing ect.

All I want to know is what your experience is/was with them. The good and bad of having them, good breeds that are sweet(doesn't have to be cuddly though I wouldn't mind that:xflove:) likes to interact with people. I know just like with birds or cats and dogs each individual has it's own personality and some can be more aloof then others so I won't have any expectations for that.

Just would like to know. And like I said this wouldn't be soon, maybe next year or the year after. Thanks in advance
 

Dona

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When my kids were little we had a wonderful rabbit. She was a Jersey Wooly mix, bought at a local pet store for $9.99. We brought her home, put her outside in a big beautiful hutch. That very night a red fox came into our deck area to check her out. We saw this and she didn't spend a full night outside. We tried to secure her in the family room with our old kid's door blockers but she could jump over them, even doubled, and often came strolling into the kitchen from the basement, a whole flight of steps away. So then I bought tall SS fencing like you'd fence in a dog and configured it in the family room. Imagine how attractive that was. :) Thumper lived there with a litter box when we were not home. She was completely litter trained with no effort by me. Otherwise she had the run of the place. Despite our best efforts to bunny proof we constantly had chewed cords and more. We fenced in our back deck and she came outside with me every morning while I had my coffee. I will remember her playing in the snow for the rest of my life. She would pop up in the air over and over in utter joy. Then I bought a leash and started taking her out with me and the kids in the neighborhood. She was a complete joy. She was always sweet, jumping into our laps while watching TV, loved to be petted and brushed, adored my little kids and followed them around. I love bunnies. The downside- they chew everything, lamp cords and your favorite sweater, her hair was often matted and I needed to have her groomed, the larger bunnies don't live very long.

I mean seriously how could you put her outside because she chewed a cord? She was as sweet as she looks.
1613080671772.jpeg
 

Clueless

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My grandbunny chewed electric cords. One year the Christmas lights while they were plugged in.

I loved her but wasn't allowed to pick her up (long story, silly, daughter completely forgot she forbid me).
 

Loveofbird

Walking the driveway
Joined
12/2/20
Messages
187
When my kids were little we had a wonderful rabbit. She was a Jersey Wooly mix, bought at a local pet store for $9.99. We brought her home, put her outside in a big beautiful hutch. That very night a red fox came into our deck area to check her out. We saw this and she didn't spend a full night outside. We tried to secure her in the family room with our old kid's door blockers but she could jump over them, even doubled, and often came strolling into the kitchen from the basement, a whole flight of steps away. So then I bought tall SS fencing like you'd fence in a dog and configured it in the family room. Imagine how attractive that was. :) Thumper lived there with a litter box when we were not home. She was completely litter trained with no effort by me. Otherwise she had the run of the place. Despite our best efforts to bunny proof we constantly had chewed cords and more. We fenced in our back deck and she came outside with me every morning while I had my coffee. I will remember her playing in the snow for the rest of my life. She would pop up in the air over and over in utter joy. Then I bought a leash and started taking her out with me and the kids in the neighborhood. She was a complete joy. She was always sweet, jumping into our laps while watching TV, loved to be petted and brushed, adored my little kids and followed them around. I love bunnies. The downside- they chew everything, lamp cords and your favorite sweater, her hair was often matted and I needed to have her groomed, the larger bunnies don't live very long.

I mean seriously how could you put her outside because she chewed a cord? She was as sweet as she looks.
View attachment 373036
Oh my what a cutie! She actually kinda looks like Thumper from Bambi lol. Thank you for you experience, makes me want a bunny even more! I heard they like to chew everything but that's not a turn off for me, I once had a crazy cat who liked to chew everything as well even with all the expensive toys I bought her. Sadly I was going through difficult times then and had to rehome her to a friend that owns a farm. She now lives the best life there and even adopted three kittens as her own(She's spayed so couldn't have her own kittens) anyways my point is chewing doesn't bother me :)
 

Loveofbird

Walking the driveway
Joined
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Messages
187
My grandbunny chewed electric cords. One year the Christmas lights while they were plugged in.

I loved her but wasn't allowed to pick her up (long story, silly, daughter completely forgot she forbid me).
Oh my! was your grandbunny okay after chewing the cords?
 

camelotshadow

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We had them as a child for a year or so.
Dad built a hutch outside.
Mine was a grey white dutch. Very smart. Would come running to me when called.

My neighbor upstairs had one who chewed big holes in the carpet. Needless to say that did not go well with the landlord as she was a renter.
 

Sparkles99

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Ontario, Canada
Great to see you doing research!

Pros:
  • Eat a less processed diet than many pets
  • Really fun to watch
  • Can eat many of the things you do (this is so fun!)
  • Won't hunt your birds
  • Can be very gentle; I do my own grooming - coat & nails, & have had to bathe them when ill.
  • There's nothing quite so peaceful as hanging out with a bun
  • Have a long lifespan if well taken care of (10-12 years), though my vet says many die younger. They don't fight infection well & are missing many adaptations most other mammals have (liquifying the contents of blisters/ abscesses, for example).
Cons:
  • Chew & destroy furniture, cords, rugs, books, upholstered furniture, & you'd be surprised at how efficient their teeth are
  • Require a huge bunny proofed area
  • Need to eat hay to wear their teeth down; hay is dusty & some people are allergic
  • Most don't like cuddles; they're a small prey animal & they know it. Some people force it/ condition them to it. I wouldn't. & you can't tell with a baby if it'll dislike or tolerate it.
  • It's hard to find a good rabbit pellet. Most contain fillers, like hulls.
  • To be at their best as pets, they should be spayed or neutered. This allows them to have a rabbit friend & prevents females from dying really young of reproductive cancer.
I see that you'd like breed advice. IME what's more important is that they be spayed or neutered. Hormones are a pain. If a rabbit has dwarf or lop in it, the chances of chronic dental issues go up. Obviously the larger the rabbit, the more expensive to keep, house, etc.

I recommend you sign up at Binky Bunny.
 

Loveofbird

Walking the driveway
Joined
12/2/20
Messages
187
Great to see you doing research!

Pros:
  • Eat a less processed diet than many pets
  • Really fun to watch
  • Can eat many of the things you do (this is so fun!)
  • Won't hunt your birds
  • Can be very gentle; I do my own grooming - coat & nails, & have had to bathe them when ill.
  • There's nothing quite so peaceful as hanging out with a bun
  • Have a long lifespan if well taken care of (10-12 years), though my vet says many die younger. They don't fight infection well & are missing many adaptations most other mammals have (liquifying the contents of blisters/ abscesses, for example).
Cons:
  • Chew & destroy furniture, cords, rugs, books, upholstered furniture, & you'd be surprised at how efficient their teeth are
  • Require a huge bunny proofed area
  • Need to eat hay to wear their teeth down; hay is dusty & some people are allergic
  • Most don't like cuddles; they're a small prey animal & they know it. Some people force it/ condition them to it. I wouldn't. & you can't tell with a baby if it'll dislike or tolerate it.
  • It's hard to find a good rabbit pellet. Most contain fillers, like hulls.
  • To be at their best as pets, they should be spayed or neutered. This allows them to have a rabbit friend & prevents females from dying really young of reproductive cancer.
I see that you'd like breed advice. IME what's more important is that they be spayed or neutered. Hormones are a pain. If a rabbit has dwarf or lop in it, the chances of chronic dental issues go up. Obviously the larger the rabbit, the more expensive to keep, house, etc.

I recommend you sign up at Binky Bunny.
Thank you for the advice, now I heard not to bathe bunnies but you said you did when yours were I'll so that's the only time to bathe them right? Or only a certain illness requires them to be bathed? Also thanks for telling me a bunny forum, I was going to ask but you beat me to it. Spay/ neuter would be my top priority especially if I'm going to have 2(not sure if I'll have two but I'll still do it if I have one) I'll remember that dwarf and lips have dental problems. And about the pellets, do you know of any good ones? Thank you so much!
 

Ephy

Walking the driveway
Joined
8/8/19
Messages
165
Hi I am interested in a bunny companion but that won't be until the next year or two. I'm just trying to get a feel for them right now.

Now I know the care and everything like always have hay in their cage, pellets and veggies, fruits only as treats, toys for mental stimulation and keeping their teeth down, vets who know how to treat rabbits. Not the small pet stores cages for them, out of cage time, wire chewing ect.

All I want to know is what your experience is/was with them. The good and bad of having them, good breeds that are sweet(doesn't have to be cuddly though I wouldn't mind that:xflove:) likes to interact with people. I know just like with birds or cats and dogs each individual has it's own personality and some can be more aloof then others so I won't have any expectations for that.

Just would like to know. And like I said this wouldn't be soon, maybe next year or the year after. Thanks in advance
i have had a handful of bunnies growing up, and even raised rescued wild bunnies that would have been put down.

I love bunnies, but they can be very fragile. They are prone to inner ear infections and respiratory problems. They can make themselves sick with stress and depression.

My first rabbit, i was so young. From what I remember, he looked like a wild rabbit, maybe a rehab rabbit. He was super friendly, chewed and peed everywhere.

2nd bunny, white with red eyes. Pet store bunny. Sweet but independent, peed everywhere, chewed everything. I was a young child, and I think my mom gave her away because she was too destructive.

3rd bunny was a rescue pet store bunny (My Fav.) It was pure luck that I found her. I Was visiting an old friend that I had not seen in years. When in her cold winter garage, I heard something move behind me that scared me.

I turned around and dug behind some boxes to discover a tiny bunny in a cage, with no food or water.

I took her home from that place within 20mins of finding her.

She was spoiled from that moment on.

At somepoint in the 10-15yrs after we brought her home, we decided she needed a friend. We were starting to go to college after all.

We brought home a petstore bunny. Poor thing only survived 5 years and after much effort to treat inner ear issues we painfully lost her. It was VERY expensive.

Our original rescue bunny was so broken hearted, she developed her own illness and passed quickly after.

It was so heart breaking.

Years later,
We found 5 new born 4 day old wild bunnies on our doorstep.

Their eyes were not even open yet.

After 2 weeks of no sleep and hours of research, we learned how to care for them. When they were fat and healthy we turned them over to a rehab sanctuary and they were successfully released. We are so proud of them. :)

Rabbits/bunnies, any animal is HARD!!!

You are no longer first. Taking on the care of animals requires hard work and constant care.
There are no days off or calling in sick when you have pets.
They will always be first. They will always require extensive care, nutrition, love and devotion.
These animals ALWAYS come first, before you drink a glass of water in the morning, they get fresh water.

Before you eat, they eat. And it has to be healthier than what your put on your plate. Btw, they eat breakfast before you do

Before your visit the bathroom, they need their potty changed.

They are amazing animals, loveable, sweet. They sheds hairs as bad as cats and may cause allergies
Not all bunnies will behave or be potty trained. They may poop, pee, and chew everything.

A little research and preparation can go a long way.
 
Last edited:

Britnicorn

Rollerblading along the road
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E192E575-6208-4FCE-8C1D-57E2BF8258B7.jpeg
I own a little bunny! They definitely make great pets if you give them the proper training/proofing of your house. My bunny doesn’t have a cage, but she is limited to one room of the house I’m in at the moment.
They’re definitely a great choice if you prefer the quiet types of animals. Bunnies don’t make much noise at all. I’ve heard of bunnies burrowing into places in the house, among other things, but mine has only ever chewed wires, which was an easy fix for me because I just started putting all of the wires I had up :roflmao: With the right positive reinforcements though, these bad habits can be removed.

Here are some things to know before getting a bunny:
-They live about 10-15 years. Bunnies are a huge commitment, way more than a hamster or a mouse is.
-They are considered exotic pets in the veterinary world, which means you’ll need to find a specialized vet and it usually costs more.
-You cannot discipline them. They are prey animals, if you yell at them you’ll only scare them which won’t fix anything at all, and possibly make it even worse.

My favorite breed of bunny is probably any of the Rex’s. I currently own a mini Rex, they are just the most people oriented in my opinion, very cuddly and affectionate:heart:
 

Sparkles99

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Location
Ontario, Canada
You bathe your bun if your vet tells you to; I've cared for a chronically & incurably, very sick bun. I mentioned it to give you an idea of how gentle they can be.

Unfortunately my favourite pellet (Sherwood) is apparently in the process of changing their recipe.

Never had a problem with full litter box training, but all of mine have been spayed/ neutered.
 

camelotshadow

Joyriding the Neighborhood
Avenue Veteran
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I'd tend to trust Higgins rabbit pellet but no real experience


Does have hulls...hmmmm



Has hay in it...We fed the rabbits pellets like this but it was so long ago. Only had them about a year & my parents gave them away.

Anyway

Good Luck.
 

AussieBird

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Chomskypom

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Texas
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Chom (pronouns they/them)
I absolutely LOVE bunnies! Good on you for learning about them first, when I had mine I heard no end of terrible stories of bunnies bought on a whim and having short, unhappy lives as a result.

So, when I was a kid, we rented. None of the rentals allowed what I really wanted, which was a dog. But they didn't say anything about rabbits... though one landlord ended up adding a specific bunny prohibition to his leases after ours. More on that later.

We got Bun-Bun at a shelter. She was about a year old, the shelter handled her spay but we would have gotten it done regardless. She was a beautiful red Rex. She didn't like to be cuddled or held, but loved contact on her terms. She'd ask for head rubs, and if she heard my dad cracking peanut shells she'd swarm up the couch and onto his chest and try to take the peanut right out of his mouth. He switched to unsalted ones for her health. Since he loved her so, my dad built this marvelous run for her in our finished basement. I think it was about six feet wide by fifteen feet long, tall enough that she couldn't jump out. Inside she had a smaller "den" sized hutch to feel secure in, tons of toys and safe materials to chew, her litter box, a hay manger, and more.

When we were home to supervise she had run of the house, since she came already potty trained (no idea whether her first family did anything to contribute to this, or if she was naturally tidy). We had to do a lot of research before getting her, learning about what she would need as well as finding a rabbit-competent vet, which was surprisingly hard. We fed her a good variety- we'd buy a big bale of hay every so often and she had as much of that as she wanted, plus fresh leafy greens twice a day, limited pellets because she tended to be a little chubby, and tons of enrichment foods from my mom's organic garden like edible flowers, herbs, and veggies. She loved a good variety of toys on a regular rotation, just like birds do. She especially liked things that made noise or that she could nibble and destroy. She had a baby toy, a ring of big rounded plastic keys, that she loved to pick up and shake or toss for attention. They don't have a "voice" really but if they want your attention they'll find a way to get it!

As for the destructiveness- we used those corrugated cable covers on any cords she could reach, so I can't speak to that, but she ripped up the carpet in corners behind furniture, chewed the baseboards, nibbled the undersides/legs of furniture, and oh the sheer destruction she wrought on wicker! It's been probably 15 years and I still feel her laughing little spirit on my shoulder when I buy anything made of wicker.

Bun-Bun lived to be 10 or 11, with only one major illness in her life. She developed a gut impaction the morning we were supposed to move cross-country (naturally). It was immediately apparent that she was sick- she was limp and floppy and let me touch her Forbidden Tummy- and had to be rushed in for emergency surgery. She recovered beautifully and continued being the absolute life of the party.
People would come over to visit, and spend a little time with her, and come away absolutely SHOCKED that "just a bunny" could have so much personality. She had boundaries that had to be respected- she absolutely could draw blood on you any day of the week if you picked her up unannounced, whether with her teeth or with those tremendously strong back legs and digging claws- but her autonomy was part of her enormous charm. We loved her so much that as a family we decided it would be unfair to replace her with another rabbit because we'd just endlessly compare it with the sainted Bun-Bun.
 

Loveofbird

Walking the driveway
Joined
12/2/20
Messages
187
i have had a handful of bunnies growing up, and even raised rescued wild bunnies that would have been put down.

I love bunnies, but they can be very fragile. They are prone to inner ear infections and respiratory problems. They can make themselves sick with stress and depression.

My first rabbit, i was so young. From what I remember, he looked like a wild rabbit, maybe a rehab rabbit. He was super friendly, chewed and peed everywhere.

2nd bunny, white with red eyes. Pet store bunny. Sweet but independent, peed everywhere, chewed everything. I was a young child, and I think my mom gave her away because she was too destructive.

3rd bunny was a rescue pet store bunny (My Fav.) It was pure luck that I found her. I Was visiting an old friend that I had not seen in years. When in her cold winter garage, I heard something move behind me that scared me.

I turned around and dug behind some boxes to discover a tiny bunny in a cage, with no food or water.

I took her home from that place within 20mins of finding her.

She was spoiled from that moment on.

At somepoint in the 10-15yrs after we brought her home, we decided she needed a friend. We were starting to go to college after all.

We brought home a petstore bunny. Poor thing only survived 5 years and after much effort to treat inner ear issues we painfully lost her. It was VERY expensive.

Our original rescue bunny was so broken hearted, she developed her own illness and passed quickly after.

It was so heart breaking.

Years later,
We found 5 new born 4 day old wild bunnies on our doorstep.

Their eyes were not even open yet.

After 2 weeks of no sleep and hours of research, we learned how to care for them. When they were fat and healthy we turned them over to a rehab sanctuary and they were successfully released. We are so proud of them. :)

Rabbits/bunnies, any animal is HARD!!!

You are no longer first. Taking on the care of animals requires hard work and constant care.
There are no days off or calling in sick when you have pets.
They will always be first. They will always require extensive care, nutrition, love and devotion.
These animals ALWAYS come first, before you drink a glass of water in the morning, they get fresh water.

Before you eat, they eat. And it has to be healthier than what your put on your plate. Btw, they eat breakfast before you do

Before your visit the bathroom, they need their potty changed.

They are amazing animals, loveable, sweet. They sheds hairs as bad as cats and may cause allergies
Not all bunnies will behave or be potty trained. They may poop, pee, and chew everything.

A little research and preparation can go a long way.
Thank you for your honest advice, I'm so sorry about your bunny that passed away, must of been like losing a member of your family, my heart breaks just thinking about it.... I will take into consideration everything you have said especially the ending. I know bunnies can be destructive but that will not turn me away at all. If I get a cute little fur ball I will get it from a rescue I live about an hour away from and if I move where I think I'm moving then it will be even closer. No matter if this bunny tears down my house I won't rehome it, I refuse actually. I'll make sure I'm its last home. Once again thank you so much :heart:
 

Loveofbird

Walking the driveway
Joined
12/2/20
Messages
187
View attachment 373060
I own a little bunny! They definitely make great pets if you give them the proper training/proofing of your house. My bunny doesn’t have a cage, but she is limited to one room of the house I’m in at the moment.
They’re definitely a great choice if you prefer the quiet types of animals. Bunnies don’t make much noise at all. I’ve heard of bunnies burrowing into places in the house, among other things, but mine has only ever chewed wires, which was an easy fix for me because I just started putting all of the wires I had up :roflmao: With the right positive reinforcements though, these bad habits can be removed.

Here are some things to know before getting a bunny:
-They live about 10-15 years. Bunnies are a huge commitment, way more than a hamster or a mouse is.
-They are considered exotic pets in the veterinary world, which means you’ll need to find a specialized vet and it usually costs more.
-You cannot discipline them. They are prey animals, if you yell at them you’ll only scare them which won’t fix anything at all, and possibly make it even worse.

My favorite breed of bunny is probably any of the Rex’s. I currently own a mini Rex, they are just the most people oriented in my opinion, very cuddly and affectionate:heart:
Aww so phoenix has a sibling how adorable! I actually plan on dedicating a room to my (future) bunny.

I would never tell at any animal, my birds, my snake, not even the fish lol. Animals have this... Innocence I guess you can call it? That makes me no matter what they do not able to tell at them, I just can't.

I was looking at rexes actually and dutches... But when it comes down to it, I think I'll get any breed or even mixes, don't think it'll matter to me once I'm at the shelter picking one
 

Loveofbird

Walking the driveway
Joined
12/2/20
Messages
187
You bathe your bun if your vet tells you to; I've cared for a chronically & incurably, very sick bun. I mentioned it to give you an idea of how gentle they can be.

Unfortunately my favourite pellet (Sherwood) is apparently in the process of changing their recipe.

Never had a problem with full litter box training, but all of mine have been spayed/ neutered.
Okay well I'll look into the pellets then
 

Loveofbird

Walking the driveway
Joined
12/2/20
Messages
187
I absolutely LOVE bunnies! Good on you for learning about them first, when I had mine I heard no end of terrible stories of bunnies bought on a whim and having short, unhappy lives as a result.

So, when I was a kid, we rented. None of the rentals allowed what I really wanted, which was a dog. But they didn't say anything about rabbits... though one landlord ended up adding a specific bunny prohibition to his leases after ours. More on that later.

We got Bun-Bun at a shelter. She was about a year old, the shelter handled her spay but we would have gotten it done regardless. She was a beautiful red Rex. She didn't like to be cuddled or held, but loved contact on her terms. She'd ask for head rubs, and if she heard my dad cracking peanut shells she'd swarm up the couch and onto his chest and try to take the peanut right out of his mouth. He switched to unsalted ones for her health. Since he loved her so, my dad built this marvelous run for her in our finished basement. I think it was about six feet wide by fifteen feet long, tall enough that she couldn't jump out. Inside she had a smaller "den" sized hutch to feel secure in, tons of toys and safe materials to chew, her litter box, a hay manger, and more.

When we were home to supervise she had run of the house, since she came already potty trained (no idea whether her first family did anything to contribute to this, or if she was naturally tidy). We had to do a lot of research before getting her, learning about what she would need as well as finding a rabbit-competent vet, which was surprisingly hard. We fed her a good variety- we'd buy a big bale of hay every so often and she had as much of that as she wanted, plus fresh leafy greens twice a day, limited pellets because she tended to be a little chubby, and tons of enrichment foods from my mom's organic garden like edible flowers, herbs, and veggies. She loved a good variety of toys on a regular rotation, just like birds do. She especially liked things that made noise or that she could nibble and destroy. She had a baby toy, a ring of big rounded plastic keys, that she loved to pick up and shake or toss for attention. They don't have a "voice" really but if they want your attention they'll find a way to get it!

As for the destructiveness- we used those corrugated cable covers on any cords she could reach, so I can't speak to that, but she ripped up the carpet in corners behind furniture, chewed the baseboards, nibbled the undersides/legs of furniture, and oh the sheer destruction she wrought on wicker! It's been probably 15 years and I still feel her laughing little spirit on my shoulder when I buy anything made of wicker.

Bun-Bun lived to be 10 or 11, with only one major illness in her life. She developed a gut impaction the morning we were supposed to move cross-country (naturally). It was immediately apparent that she was sick- she was limp and floppy and let me touch her Forbidden Tummy- and had to be rushed in for emergency surgery. She recovered beautifully and continued being the absolute life of the party.
People would come over to visit, and spend a little time with her, and come away absolutely SHOCKED that "just a bunny" could have so much personality. She had boundaries that had to be respected- she absolutely could draw blood on you any day of the week if you picked her up unannounced, whether with her teeth or with those tremendously strong back legs and digging claws- but her autonomy was part of her enormous charm. We loved her so much that as a family we decided it would be unfair to replace her with another rabbit because we'd just endlessly compare it with the sainted Bun-Bun.
Bun-Bun is like one of the cutest names I have ever heard for a bunny!

Wow they have such amazing personalities, just like birds! And dogs and cats!

Yes it's true people impulse buy bunnies thinking their 'easy' but honestly is any animal easy?

My uncle had bought a bunny for my cousin years ago thinking it was an easy pet.... The first two weeks they were happy with it but eventually it got 'boring' to them and they stopped letting it out and socializing with it. Long story short it died a short unhappy life. They didn't even try to bond with it so it's personality never really got to shine. I would never do such a thing....

Thank you for your experience :) so far I'm still not deterred from bunnies, we'll see how I feel in the next year or two though(though I don't think it'll change lol)
 

Britnicorn

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Washington State
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Aww so phoenix has a sibling how adorable! I actually plan on dedicating a room to my (future) bunny.

I would never tell at any animal, my birds, my snake, not even the fish lol. Animals have this... Innocence I guess you can call it? That makes me no matter what they do not able to tell at them, I just can't.

I was looking at rexes actually and dutches... But when it comes down to it, I think I'll get any breed or even mixes, don't think it'll matter to me once I'm at the shelter picking one
For sure! I’ve never went out of my way to pick a breed... Maxine (my bunny) was actually surrendered to me by someone who couldn’t take care of her, she was so skinny and neglected when she came to me. I hope Phoenix likes her, because they’re roommates now :roflmao:
 
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