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Breeding Quaker Parrots

Beasley1114

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I just got a pair of quakers. The person I recieved them from says the female has only laid infertile eggs for her. I believe they were fed a seed only diet and their feathers are in sad shape. The male also has a deformed leg that he doesn't put weight on much but gets around the cage fine.

I have replaced their perches with natural branches in a sturdier position in their cage. Provided seed/pellets, chop, egg food and plan to offer other soft foods. Provided them with a calcium chew and plan to provide a calcium supplement in their food. Will be increasing daylight hours and humidity.

The pair is obviously bonded. The female has no trouble laying eggs either. Is it unreasonable to think that making these changes could help the fertility issue or is the fact that the male has a deformed leg make it a lost cause due to balance issues perhaps?

Also, please no hate. I breed because I live in an area where it is very hard to find tame parrots or even any other than parakeets. My babies go to homes with information packets, toys, food, and a contract that they are to be returned to me if the owner can't keep them. I am very picky.
 

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Zara

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Is it unreasonable to think that making these changes could help the fertility issue or is the fact that the male has a deformed leg make it a lost cause due to balance issues perhaps?
It could be he isn´t able to ¨grab on¨ to her very well and is falling. You would have to observe them mating and see if they manage to do it (completely) or not.
Worth mentioning it to your vet when you go for their check up.
As you have just got the birds and made the changes, you would be best waiting 6 months before allowing to breed, so you have tonnes of time to look into why this is happening. If it is the male losing balance, then maybe it is time to retire them.
 

melissasparrots

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It could very well be that the male has balance problems. It could also be that they have had horrible nutrition. The green one shows all the signs of serious diet problems. The feather plucking may or may not be part of it. But that greasy unnatural shine to the feathers means a total diet overhaul is needed and probably a vet check too. I'd also seriously question how old these birds are. The green one does not look like an especially healthy or young individual.
 

Irishj9

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It could also very well be that its because these birds breed in groups in huge multi storey colonies, not in a cage and nestbox.

Their colonies are so large and LOUD, and their communal nests so HUUUUGE ( bring down the telegraph poles where they build), that they are regarded as a pest in many countries and breeding is banned.

One local breeder used to breed and hand rear them. I stood near the colony. My hearing is still not quite right
 
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