1. Welcome to Avian Avenue! To view our forum with less advertisments please register with us.
    Memberships are free and it will just take a moment. Click here

Is this an accurate timeline of when a particular species will be hormonal?

Discussion in 'Breeders Boulevard' started by CrazyBirdChick, 10/10/17.

  1. CrazyBirdChick

    CrazyBirdChick Rollerblading along the road

    Joined:
    12/10/15
    Messages:
    2,759
    Location:
    Chicago , Illinois
    Real Name:
    Diane
    Bird Species / Breeding Season

    Cockatiels
    Can breed all year around

    Green Cheeked Conures
    August – October

    Maroon Bellied Conures
    August – October

    Sun Conures
    July– November

    Jenday Conures
    August – October

    Nanday Conures
    August – October

    Alexandrines
    July – September

    Indian Ringnecks
    July – September

    Galahs
    July– December

    Corellas
    September– December

    Cockatoos
    September– January

    Moustache Parrots
    July – September

    Quakers
    October – January o_O

    Eclectus Parrots
    Can breed all year around

    Rainbow Lorikeets
    Can breed all year around

    *I got this info from
    Common Breeding Season for Birds | Impulse Parrots | Bird Breeders

    If this is correct I'm in for it till Jan :scared3:
     
  2. painesgrey

    painesgrey Jogging around the block

    Joined:
    10/17/15
    Messages:
    777
    Real Name:
    Rachel
    There are so many variables here it's difficult to say.

    You have to remember that some of these birds are native to the Southern Hemisphere, which puts their seasons opposite of those in the Northern Hemisphere. The site you linked is Australian, so their breeding times will be different for birds in the US and Europe. The October-January breeding season for Quakers is Spring and Summer in the Southern Hemisphere, which makes total sense in this context. I highly doubt that the wild Quakers in the US are breeding in the middle of winter.

    But I (personally) don't think that birds in the Northern Hemisphere are going to act hormonal based on what month it is. Rather, only what season they're currently experiencing. This change from their normal, wild cousins is made even more complicated by the fact that indoor environments are usually always good for breeding. Moderate temperatures, ample food supply, and consistent light make great breeding conditions year-round.
     
    Mizzely and CrazyBirdChick like this.
  3. finchly

    finchly Rollerblading along the road Mayor of the Avenue I Can't Stop Posting!

    Joined:
    5/16/14
    Messages:
    2,139
    Location:
    SW Florida
    Real Name:
    Tanya
    Agreed.
    So... you can control it somewhat by altering those factors (temp, food, light). I have changed light hours in the past to prevent breeding. Most recently, we were getting ready to separate male and female finches. I had read that a well known breeder used chick starter from the feed store, a chicken product, as his egg food for finches. Started using it last week. Now I have 4 pairs nesting, that had not bred all year. :bash:
     
    Familyof12 and CrazyBirdChick like this.
  4. CrazyBirdChick

    CrazyBirdChick Rollerblading along the road

    Joined:
    12/10/15
    Messages:
    2,759
    Location:
    Chicago , Illinois
    Real Name:
    Diane
    Interesting and good to know. Thanks guys!!
     
    Familyof12 and finchly like this.
  5. BrianB

    BrianB Strolling the yard

    Joined:
    2/22/17
    Messages:
    114
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    I've always found these to be a good basic guideline. In reality, Mother Nature does what she wants, when she wants. I'm never surprised when birds breed outside of their normal season.
     
    Familyof12 and CrazyBirdChick like this.

Users Viewing Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 0)