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Urgent Weird feet

Ana Sofia

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Ana Sofia
Although the skin on your baby's toes looks unusual. There is nothing about them that alarms me. There is no redness, no sign of irritation, no indication of cracks through to the flesh, no suppuration. The pattern of the skin is similar to other macaws I've seen, only with the bumps more prominent.

The macaw feet that I'm familiar with have almost smooth areas where they have been worn down and other areas where the bumps are more prominent and not worn down.

I would certainly consult my vet again if I wasn't happy with his first answer.
I truly hope is indeed nothing to be concerned of and that is just unlucky he got ugly foot

He does claims a lot aorund his cage and likes to do it so much so I hope is related to that and nothing else…

thank you for your answer
 

Milo

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Although, if that would be it.. what woube the reason for it to happen?
Ah okay, if he's been to the vet and had some tests done, just keep an eye on it then.

There are a lot of "weird" things out there that are just things that happen incidentally for one reason or another. It could be that he's not sitting normally and that's causing the skin to grow in an abnormal way.

Another possibility that seems less likely because of the diet is vitamin A deficiency. Vitamin A helps with skin cell growth and a lack of it can cause a lot of things with their skin and epithelial cells in general. If you're not already, making sure that he's actually eating all the portions of his diet and not just the fruit and seeds would be a good next step.

It sounds like trying to consult another vet would give you some peace of mind. There are a couple ways that you can do that, either call the places yourself and see if they will do a phone or Zoom consultation, or request that your vet reach out for a second opinion. I understand finding a vet can be complicated geographically sometimes but there are options! Alternatively if you can find an accredited zoo vet that would be another option.
 

Ana Sofia

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Ana Sofia
Ah okay, if he's been to the vet and had some tests done, just keep an eye on it then.

There are a lot of "weird" things out there that are just things that happen incidentally for one reason or another. It could be that he's not sitting normally and that's causing the skin to grow in an abnormal way.

Another possibility that seems less likely because of the diet is vitamin A deficiency. Vitamin A helps with skin cell growth and a lack of it can cause a lot of things with their skin and epithelial cells in general. If you're not already, making sure that he's actually eating all the portions of his diet and not just the fruit and seeds would be a good next step.

It sounds like trying to consult another vet would give you some peace of mind. There are a couple ways that you can do that, either call the places yourself and see if they will do a phone or Zoom consultation, or request that your vet reach out for a second opinion. I understand finding a vet can be complicated geographically sometimes but there are options! Alternatively if you can find an accredited zoo vet that would be another option.
thank you for your answer and tips! will keep an eye on him! and his way of eating!

I call another avian vet and he immediately told me he needs a surgery cause for him it seems that the blood around his toes is not circulating very well… Im afraid to follow that while he just saw it on a photo so im going to call again to two more avian vets and if they say something similar then we will atke actions.

Thanks a lot for your time and everything
 

Ripshod

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The way I read it he only has access to smooth or soft perches. There's no natural perches with bark, perches that will naturally help him shed old skin.
Or am I reading this wrong?
 

Ana Sofia

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The way I read it he only has access to smooth or soft perches. There's no natural perches with bark, perches that will naturally help him shed old skin.
Or am I reading this wrong?
I’m not sure which ones you mean, he has the java perches and a white rope so I don’t really have very natural ones since Im afraid I get one that is dangerous for him! do you have any recommendations?:)
 

Big Blues

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Hi, I recommend to continue consultation with Avian Vets as others have mentioned. His perch material is one concern but the size under his feet is another. If his perches are too large he cannot grip the perch his toes are not exercising as it would in the wild with different size perching to exercise his toes and feet in general.
 

Big Blues

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Found this as a guide.

When choosing a perch, size is a critical factor. Incorrectly sized perches can be a source of pain and discomfort in a bird's legs and feet.

Good foot health is promoted by having multiple perches of varying diameters available with your bird's cage. The generally accepted rule of thumb is that your bird's feet should wrap between 2/3 and 3/4 around the perch.



Diameter RangeAppropriate for:
3/8" - 7/8"Finch, Canary
1/2" - 1"Parrotlet, Lovebird, Parakeet, Cockatiel
3/4" - 1 1/4"Conure, Caique, Meyers, Quaker, Pionus, Senegal, Timneh Grey
1" - 2"Eclectus, Congo African Grey, Small Cockatoo, Small Macaw, Amazon
2" - 3 1/2" Large Cockatoo, Large Macaw
 

Ana Sofia

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Ana Sofia
Found this as a guide.

When choosing a perch, size is a critical factor. Incorrectly sized perches can be a source of pain and discomfort in a bird's legs and feet.

Good foot health is promoted by having multiple perches of varying diameters available with your bird's cage. The generally accepted rule of thumb is that your bird's feet should wrap between 2/3 and 3/4 around the perch.



Diameter RangeAppropriate for:
3/8" - 7/8"Finch, Canary
1/2" - 1"Parrotlet, Lovebird, Parakeet, Cockatiel
3/4" - 1 1/4"Conure, Caique, Meyers, Quaker, Pionus, Senegal, Timneh Grey
1" - 2"Eclectus, Congo African Grey, Small Cockatoo, Small Macaw, Amazon
2" - 3 1/2"Large Cockatoo, Large Macaw
Hello, he does have different variation of perch diameters so he is not putting the same pressure all the time.
 

Ana Sofia

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Hi, I recommend to continue consultation with Avian Vets as others have mentioned. His perch material is one concern but the size under his feet is another. If his perches are too large he cannot grip the perch his toes are not exercising as it would in the wild with different size perching to exercise his toes and feet in general.
Im thoughtful of his perch materials though since he most of them are java tree which means is super soft perches without texture. if I get some with more texture you think it will help let loose the bad skin of his feet?
 

Big Blues

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Possibly, a thought to consider. In the wild they have varying rough wood for perching. Not sure why he has this oddity. If it isn't painful and inflamed he is likely OK but vets should have more ideas of what is causing it.
 
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