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Lots of questions before purchasing a bird

Dcalf

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3/2/23
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Now retired and thinking of purchasing a parrot since I have plenty of time to devote to one.(yes I realize they live a long time so I will make plans for when I'm no longer here) I am an artist so I'm home working most of the time. I am doing research and trying to ask all the questions before I buy. Ok my main questions.....
The little guy will be in my sunroom with me most of the time while I'm doing my art. Sometimes I have to go take the dog for a walk or go downstairs to our laundry room etc. If your bird is out on its perch, do you put it back into cage every time you leave the room? I don't have a 'bird room it will be in my great room on a perch or in my sunroom.
Next .... Most of my sunroom windows have 2 inch blinds so I don't worry about the bird flying into them, however I have a sliding door that goes out to my screenroom and a huge sliding door that goes into my greatroom. Should I have the wings clipped so it wont fly into one of the glass doors?

Is this the correct area to ask these questions? Thanks, D
 

Mizzely

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I don't put them away each time, but I do make sure there is another barrier between the outdoors and them. Whether thats just tucking them into a different room, having a double entry, floor length curtains, etc.

I have fully flighted birds, and in the same room I have two sets of all glass patio doors. I just use sheer curtains to keep them from running into them.

Make the environment suit the bird, not the bird suit the environment :)

What kind of art do you do? Some paints, etc are harmful for their respiratory systems.
 

MommyBird

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What kind of art do you do? Some paints, etc are harmful for their respiratory systems.
That's what I was going to ask!
This might have some info if you are a painter:
The Health Risks of Painting with Oils, Acrylics, and Watercolors | Artsy
If you are a sculptor, woodworker or create a lot of dust that is also a problem.

Some of my flock can be out for hours unattended but I have bird-proofed the rooms and they don't get into trouble.
But others, say, my Goffin, couldn't be trusted not to disassemble everything in the room in the time it would take me to walk out turn around and come right back in.
 

Tazlima

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Took too long to draft this, and others have already responded, but chiming in to say that depending on what kind of art you do, you'll want to research the various materials and processes you use to make sure they're safe for birds to be around. Avian respiratory systems are incredibly delicate, so any paint, glue, fixing sprays, heating elements, etc. will need to be vetted. (If you're doing pencil drawings on paper, disregard). Birds can also be mischievous and love to chew and shred stuff, so that's also a consideration having them around while you do art.

I sometimes have to take close-up photos of various items for my job, and one of my cockatiels always tries to chew on my subject matter (in my case, if the items get slightly damaged it's no big deal, or I would have to lock him up during that time).

Generally speaking, I don't lock my birds up when I leave the room. More often, they follow us humans around the house, as we might do something fun and interesting and they love to be involved in everything. Clear glass is covered with something visible to keep them from flying into it. For exterior doors, that also provides a second layer of security... A gauzy curtain or hanging beads can be enough to block an accidental flight outdoors.

I think of my bird's cages like kids' bedrooms. It's their own space where they can retreat when they are tired or just want to be alone, but there's rarely a good reason to lock them in. Instead, we have bird-safe stations around the house so they can hang around with us without getting into too much mischief.

I do lock my quaker in his cage at night, because otherwise he'll stay up way too late and get really cranky (the others have enough sense to go to sleep when they're tired). They also all get put in travel cages and moved to a central bathroom when we have the occasional tornado watch. Otherwise, they're pretty much always free to come and go.

The dog actually gets locked up way more often than the birds, because we never leave them unattended together. If we leave the house, doggo gets shut in the bedroom until we return. She's a good dog, but even the best dog can have a bad day, so we take no chances.

It's a lot like bringing a toddler into your home... you can either get out ahead of it and bird-proof everything and enjoy having them around, or you'll spend all your time saying "don't touch that," "stay out of there," and "spit that out."

Sometimes you have to get creative, too. We have a set of open shelves where we keep our pots and pans, and our tiel Gordon loved climbing around on the dishes, which resulted in us having to constantly wash whole stacks of kitchenware.

I finally found a way to keep him out - a clear plastic shower curtain liner pinned across the front of the whole thing.We can see what's in there, and simply pull back the curtain to grab what we need, and Gordon can't get in there to make his messes. It looks a bit silly, but it does the trick.
 

Dcalf

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Thanks for your input! I do needle felting. Making pictures with colored wool and felt. No harm to a bird unless they eat some wool. :meh: So obviously I could not take a chance and leave him in my art area unsupervised. I am lookin at possibly a green cheek conure. Would a couple hours in the morning and a couple hours in the evening be enough time out of the cage. If so , I would just spend that time with the bird and then put him in the cage by my work desk so he would be safe while I'm in and out. I am thinking of a 24 x 36 inch cage which would be big enough to have a lot of toys and keep him happy.
 
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