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Is a Cape Parrot right for us?

Gimby

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Katie Denski
2) I want a bird that will tag along with me to work (I'd set up a cage there) and to walk our dogs in parks or small cities with other people / dogs / bikes / cars etc. Would this be a good bird for that type of activity?
Boy oh boy do you sound like me :) And in fact, I did this. I do not anymore. You have to start young. African parrots in general are a very shy and reserved type of parrot BUT I did not raise my Cape I bought her at a few years old. I suppose it could be done but you have to start at a very young and get your bird socialized. I never took Ariel to work. I feel she would be too flighty and scared but again I didn't raise her. I took my Green Wing Macaw Charlie to work though. I have pictures of us. I took her everywhere in fact. She was a wonderful companion for that, and my Blue Front Amazon Patti was to. Sadly, they were rescues and unfortunately are deceased. No condolences needed. Im jsut saying as to why I do not anymore because it physically isn't possible anymore. I'm really not sure the answer to this question. I believe it has to do with how you raise your Cape but as a species they are more reserved more so than a Green wing, Blue Front, or a Hahns.
 

Gimby

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3) I really only want one bird. Have read that some birds NEED companionship and others are ok without.
For the longest time I had one bird, but she travelled everywhere with me and we were thick as thieves but at times I'd leave er home alone and she'd be perfectly fine. I wouldnt really worry about this. Once you bond with your parrot all they really want is you, if you develop a bond, fingers crossed, you do :). And to really followup with your question - I currently have three and they all hate each other. They get jealous over who gets time with me.
 

Gimby

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4) We live in the Philadelphia suburbs. I would plann to setup an outdoor space but I imagine the bird might have to be indoors for a few months? That is OK. I live in MI. Same situtation. Mine survive being indoors for a few months and are very happy to be outdoors in summer time.

5) I would love to spend time devouring training material before bringing the bird home. what do you recommend I read / watch? EVERY THING YOU CAN. Jean Pattison the African Queen. If youre looking for a Cape delve into her material but take your search beyond the internet to or in forums such as this. You seem to be doing it right. Get a book too. Read those. Just any body can post on internet - You must be able to decipher bs from true facts.

6) How do I proceed with ordering / buying? Research breeders, reputation of them, lineage, etc. I just gave you one above. She's excellent. Produced books to.

Any questions you're more than welcome to reach me though here. Id be more than happy to help more, if need be.
 

Lady Jane

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Capes are CLUMSY.
When a bird is described as clumsy it is usually because they are a heavy bird. Is this the reason why?
 

Gimby

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When a bird is described as clumsy it is usually because they are a heavy bird. Is this the reason why?
That is a great question! I'm not totally sure but from what Ive read about Capes and from my personal experience with them - I've had the pleasure of being a temporary home to a male Cape and now a forever home my current female Cape they both just seemed .. for example - stepping up and over something is a much slower movement than for example my Hawk Head doing the same exact movement. Hawk Head she's 100mph doing same exact movement - no problem where as if the Cape does that exact movement at a fast pace like the Hawk head she's sure to slip or stumble it's just not going to be a movement without imperfection. Hawk head is like an acrobat compared to Cape who's like a beginner gymnast. I don't really know how to explain it. I tried:D. It may be from Cape being a heavier-bodied bird BUT I also believe it is how they are brought up. Ariel for example, was bought as a baby from a petstore, I know I was there, by a friend and he raised her but he was so uneducated in parrots that she didn't have, as a baby parrot swings, different perch varieties, crucial things of that develop coordination and the muscles that all birds need in life. I very much believe that the way she was raised has A LOT to do with her clumsiness. I've heard from many and experienced, in general the species is clumsy, which was the case with that male too, but my Ariel is especially because of not only her species but unfortunately the way she grew up. I hope that helps. That is just my belief and my research. Take it with a grain of salt:cool:
 

Lady Jane

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Thanks for your detailed response.
 

MnGuy

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When a bird is described as clumsy it is usually because they are a heavy bird. Is this the reason why?
I have a CAG, a species that is often described as clumsy. I haven't had any larger species. I find that greys need a lot of space to maneuver and fly well, so even my 1,200-sq-foot house doesn't offer adequate space. I think that's where the "clumsy" comes into play--these bigger, heavier birds need more space but don't have it, so they look clumsy trying to fly in a smaller space.

My grey isn't clumsy walking around, stepping over things, etc.
 
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