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Considering Doves or Button Quail

aqualover9

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Since many have advised me not to get a parrot, I'm looking into doves and button quail. Wondering if either can be tamed? Experiences?
 

expressmailtome

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Both can become tame, however I am not sure how much they enjoy being touched.
 

Zara

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@Birdbabe has a dove (I think, I´m sorry if I´m mistaken)

@MahaSarah has a few button quail...
Some one else does too... If I can remember who, I will come back and link them ;)
I think button quail like to like as little groups, not alone. Just remember that.

Edit:
@IttyBittyBirds @NandayLover
 
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fashionfobie

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Zara is correct. Button quail do best in a little group. You need to research the particular type you want. Button quail is a term used to describe a large range of the coturnix genus. Some do better in pairs some do better in convoys. The balance between the sexes is very important. The little australian king quails (which I have seen marketed as button quail) do better in bonded pairs, and they don't always enjoy the mates we choose for them. Quail can be very tame but you shouldn't expect it instantly. They will require immense work to bond with and they will likely never be hand tame.

I have seen a few cute youtube videos of hand tame quail. Normally these chicks were raised from day one around people.

Some of the advantages of the small quails is the very minimal smell. They have very low ammonia output compared to chickens. They are also very quiet.

My close friend had a flock of Japanese button quail. She honestly had to make many vet visits and they were an emotional roller-coaster for her. They would fright easily and run into objects in their panic. She was a wonderful bird owner with a massive heart. They had heaps of enrichment burrows and toys. They had a large enclosure and were her pride and joy. The littlest things would fright them.. a dog barking outside for example. She didn't own a dog. Even in their enclosure they would fright and sometime get concussed. I had many phone calls in tears. Her quail were recuses so they were probably more skittish than what you may find.

They do not have the lifespans of parrots. They normally live less than 5 years for Japanese quails.. some species live longer up to 14 years. My poor friend slowly said good bye to all of her quail within the span of a year since they all were aging together. She had a hard time with it. Something to consider.


Now she keeps rescue pigeons. She has two. They are really wonderful pets. Her pigeons have to be some of the luckiest rock doves on earth. She even has hatch day parties for them. She wears t-shirts that have pictures of her pigeons on them. She is such an awesome person :)

I hope this helps share some of the realities of keeping little quail.
 

MahaSarah

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Button Quails are the cutest little things. They are quiet and very entertaining to watch. They are very flighty and skittish so as far as hand taming goes it will be very difficult but can be done. For the most part, though they are just an observational pet.
They need to be kept in pairs or more (preferably not 3 but 2 or 4 or more). Be prepared for fights between them, my button quails also cost me a lot of time and money when it came to treating any injuries when it came to fights or squabbles between them. They normally don't live past 5 years, more like 3-4 years. Oh and also be very wary of egg binding, my females loved to lay eggs and would lay them constantly so their diet would need to be supplemented to ensure they are getting the right nutrients.
There are a lot of youtube videos about button quail care that I suggest you check out (including one on my channel).

I personally have no personal experience with doves but from my limited interactions with them, they seem like lovely pets.
 

Lincee

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I would consider doves over buttons, the later are best kept in an aviary, but doves can become really tame! The ring-necked dove is a particulairy gentle creature, and a perfect dove for beginners, they can be easily tamed and when kept in pairs (i think no animal should ever be kept alone) are really a joy to live with :)
 

Birdbabe

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Doves are awesome! I have two ringnecks, a mourning dove and her majesty Snowpea,,pigeon.
 

aqualover9

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Thank you all!! I will continue to do my research. I think I’ll get a dove since I don’t live new any button quail breeders and they don’t have to be in groups.
 

fashionfobie

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Doves are wonderful birds :) I think a pair is ideal. They will still get bonded to you if they have a buddy.

I look forward to seeing pictures of your little ones when you have decided what you are doing.
 

harpersmom

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I still think you should wait later in life for a bird period. Not just a parrot. Vet bills still cost the same and the future will probably be the best time to consider a bird.
 

AmyJas

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I still think you should wait later in life for a bird period. Not just a parrot. Vet bills still cost the same and the future will probably be the best time to consider a bird.
However, there is a lower life expectancy for a dove, so this is, practically speaking, a shorter term commitment with less potential costs. It sounds from her previous posts that she has been generally successful in getting her parents on board and has been honest about vet bills and upkeep costs. If her parents are on board with the necessity of taking a sick bird to the vet and providing him or her with the best care possible, I think it's a good idea.
 

aqualover9

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However, there is a lower life expectancy for a dove, so this is, practically speaking, a shorter term commitment with less potential costs. It sounds from her previous posts that she has been generally successful in getting her parents on board and has been honest about vet bills and upkeep costs. If her parents are on board with the necessity of taking a sick bird to the vet and providing him or her with the best care possible, I think it's a good idea.
Thank you so much for your support! :hug8:Maybe I could get one during the summer when I have more time to tame him or her so when school starts we already have a bond.
 
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