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Concerned about over regurgitation and possible causes.

Summzz

Strolling the yard
Joined
2/7/20
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Canada
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Summer
Hi everyone.
I'm hoping to find some answer on how to help my 12 year old Sun Conure, Mango. He has always over-regurgitate, in my opinion anyways, since he was about 9 which is when my other Conure Claire started laying eggs ( she was also about 9 so it was a surprise to us). It would be on and with everything too, his perches, all his toys, the side of the cage, less likely but still sometimes on t-shirts and clothing. We tired everything to calm it down but even when Claire stopped laying, he would continue. Talked to the vet about it and they thought he was just an over hormonal bird. We aren't able to really "touch" or pet him either as he is a rescue and is quite afraid of hands (although he has gotten much better over the years to were we can sometimes help with pin feathers). I weight them daily and would always see his weight fluctuate massively but it never dip too low to be scary. Sadly his friend Claire pass away February this year and we have all been struggling. While they weren't a really close bonded pair I do believe they still "loved" each other and of course enjoyed spending time together. We've done everything we can to help him up till getting another buddy because we haven't found another suitable rescue for our family/ we have been really missing my baby so it's been hard. The problem now is his regurgitation seems to have multiplied x10 since her passing and I honestly worry about his health. I'll hear him in the middle of the night doing it, before I can get him breakfast he's doing it, during the day he does it multiple times, on anything he can get to as well. There is only a little time during the day were he does normal activities like plays, naps, eats, etc. Even when he does come to sit with me he starts right away so I try to put him back to play somewhere else as I thought at first it was just me making him do it. I know it's normal to regurgitate but isn't this much too much? Can it be causes by stress? If so, has anyone experienced this before and have anyways to help him.
A little about his current routine to help:

.He gets 12 hours of sleep (8:30 am to 8:30 pm) with black out blinds so it's dark that whole time
.Healthy diet we've had them on since we got them (veggies through out the day with the odd specials snack here and there, training snacks and pellets for dinner)
.He's outside his home almost the whole time during the day (expect for maybe the odd day were I have to go to town)
. Has tons of toys to destroy and play with
. Doesn't like to spend to much time with people including me expect for flying over to me to sit with me/chew on my clothes every once and awhile but does enjoy sitting next to people and doing training.
. Gets exercise like flying around the house
. As mentioned before doesn't let me pet him much so I've never touched him anywhere but his head and of course feet.

I worry he is not only going to get sick but possibly drop too much weight. Anyone have any ideas?
Thanks
 

WillowQ

Rollerblading along the road
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Heather Gerbyshak
Has your conure been checked for proventricular dilatation disorder? That is one thing I would rule out before deciding a bird is hormonal, if his weight changes so much from all that regurgitation.

Is he otherwise healthy?

I would increase dark time to 13 or 14 hours of real dark to try to turn down the hormones if it’s just a honey bird thing.

I think male birds can be treated with Lupron, too, to decrease sexual behavior and health problems. @Pixiebeak might know.
 

Summzz

Strolling the yard
Joined
2/7/20
Messages
117
Location
Canada
Real Name
Summer
Has your conure been checked for proventricular dilatation disorder? That is one thing I would rule out before deciding a bird is hormonal, if his weight changes so much from all that regurgitation.

Is he otherwise healthy?

I would increase dark time to 13 or 14 hours of real dark to try to turn down the hormones if it’s just a honey bird thing.

I think male birds can be treated with Lupron, too, to decrease sexual behavior and health problems. @Pixiebeak might know.
So I had never heard of PDD so he hasn't been checked for that. Looking up about it though he really doesn't have any of the symptoms except for the weight loss and if the regurgitation was actually vomiting. I'm pretty sure it is regurgitation as my female who did pass away we are pretty sure vomited (she sadly dealt with other health issues) and it was nothing like he is doing now. I could be wrong but I think what he is doing is regurgitation but I was worried becuase I read stress could also cause it not just hormones. I am going to do more research today though and ask the vet about PDD just in case!
 

WillowQ

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Heather Gerbyshak
Ok. But also cutting back on hours a day of light is the first way to manage hormonal behavior. 14 dark to 10 light may help.
 

Summzz

Strolling the yard
Joined
2/7/20
Messages
117
Location
Canada
Real Name
Summer
Ok. But also cutting back on hours a day of light is the first way to manage hormonal behavior. 14 dark to 10 light may help.
Oh yea for sure going to try that. I just know schedule changes can take a bit to see differences so just going to look into other things at the same time just in case!
 

WillowQ

Rollerblading along the road
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Heather Gerbyshak
That’s true. I was mostly worried about the weight loss. But maybe I didn’t take into account the stress of his mate dying? That would slim anyone down. Poor guy.

My gcc got very upset (seemed honestly disturbed) when his Quaker roommate passed. I thought they hated each other but guess I was wrong. Your male may be very confused and distressed.
 

Summzz

Strolling the yard
Joined
2/7/20
Messages
117
Location
Canada
Real Name
Summer
That’s true. I was mostly worried about the weight loss. But maybe I didn’t take into account the stress of his mate dying? That would slim anyone down. Poor guy.

My gcc got very upset (seemed honestly disturbed) when his Quaker roommate passed. I thought they hated each other but guess I was wrong. Your male may be very confused and distressed.
Yea his weight has always gone up and down bit never as low as when she first passed ( it still wasn't low enough my vet said to worry about though). For the first week or so he barely wanted to eat, he had to have his favorite food to really get him to eat something. He eats normally now but is doing the obsessive "gurging" so I feel that's why his weight is staying lower but it's always worth another check! I honestly never thought my two were that close either as she typically was sassy towards him but he's such a dope he would still want to play with her and snuggle with her when he could. They never liked being without each other so I think he is really going through it now. He also has never been a very human bird so he only liked socializing very little no matter how much I tried. I wanted to see about getting another rescue as I think just having company would help (not that it replaces her) but it's been rough finding one suitable for him. I know how rough it is for us humans to go through grief so I just feel bad I can't help him as much as I would like.
 

WillowQ

Rollerblading along the road
Joined
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Heather Gerbyshak
I would think this is about stress and grief. I’m sorry I even thought of PDD. Of course he’s going to lose weight if he’s frantically feeding all his toys. Parent birds lose weight when they have chicks, too.
 
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