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Color of the a budgies cere with certain mutations.

Lovebird27

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Christian
I’ve come across several budgies that I can’t sex. I also noticed that some mutations influence the color of the cere. For instance, this violet budgie has a vibrant blue cere which lets me know it’s a male. On the other hand, the budgies on the other pic seem to have an identical cere. Which one is the male? How can we differentiate?
 

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Ripshod

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It's not so simple is it? A budgie's cere changes colour when it matures. In general all male ceres will be pink or violet when young changing to a rich blue when he matures. This does not include certain mutations including ino budgies where the cere will remain pink/violet.
You correctly identified the male on the left (rich blue, mature), but the birds on the right are also both male juveniles (pink turning blue).
So cere colour depends on gender, age and mutation.
This is a huge topic with many twists and turns. I understand you want to learn but to give a complete answer that anyone would understand takes a load of work.
I'll get you some links.
 

Ripshod

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A little trick with ceres that are changing. As the change starts at the nares look at the furthest point from there - like the bottom edge - to pick up the original juvenile colour.
 

Lovebird27

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Christian
It's not so simple is it? A budgie's cere changes colour when it matures. In general all male ceres will be pink or violet when young changing to a rich blue when he matures. This does not include certain mutations including ino budgies where the cere will remain pink/violet.
You correctly identified the male on the left (rich blue, mature), but the birds on the right are also both male juveniles (pink turning blue).
So cere colour depends on gender, age and mutation.
This is a huge topic with many twists and turns. I understand you want to learn but to give a complete answer that anyone would understand takes a load of work.
I'll get you some links.
Thank you so much.
 

Lovebird27

Strolling the yard
Joined
1/2/20
Messages
80
Real Name
Christian
A little trick with ceres that are changing. As the change starts at the nares look at the furthest point from there - like the bottom edge - to pick up the original juvenile colour.
Yea it’s a bit tricky. So these are both males?
 

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