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Amazon + Velcro Bird = Disaster?

Penny_

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My Amazon is bonded to me, but the family is considering another bird. If the conure bonded and velcroed to me, would it devastate my Amazon? I am happy to provide more info, but I think that about covers the question. I would not be abanonding my Amazon. He is my baby, but he prefers play time to cuddle time. We only cuddle a few minutes before bed. That is how he likes it.

TIA lovely people!
 

Teckechick

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My worry would be with beak size differences first. Your amazon could really hurt a conure sized bird. I think we would need more information on how the birds would be housed and interacted with. Are you ready for separate out times as an example? If you have your amazon on you and the conure flies over what would you do if they started fighting? Do either of the birds like other birds?
 

flyzipper

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I agree the size difference is potentially a significant issue and adds complexity and risk that must be managed.

He is my baby, but he prefers play time to cuddle time. We only cuddle a few minutes before bed.
This is somewhat hopeful on the surface -- it'd be more worrisome if the bigger bird was overly bonded (leading to aggression), but it sounds like you've got some healthy independence in your Amazon. That doesn't remove the risk of mixed sizes, but might make it more manageable.

Conures don't appear to know they're small, or care, and this created some very scary situations until mine learned to keep distance from my Severe.

How long has your Amazon been an only bird?

My Severe was an only bird for 10 years (the majority of his life), and his skills for living in a flock aren't developed. I'll add that he was re-homed because he chased the previous family's grandkids (something that I didn't think would be an issue in my child-free home, but he still exhibits this behaviour toward my other birds -- large and small).

Conversely, I adopted a Military who had other macaws as flock mates and he is skillful at navigating flock dynamics.

My experience with these varied sizes coexisting (not harmoniously) is that it comes down to how aggressive or passive each member is. None of mine interact directly, and that would be fine and easy if that was the end of it. My Severe complicates the mix because his aggression causes him to sometimes chase the other two (increasing difficulty). My Conure and Military respond by flying away from the Severe (reducing difficulty). With this, it's easy to see how it'd be more far more challenging to manage if multiple birds were aggressive, or if some didn't deescalate.

Over time you can learn what triggers aggression to help manage the dynamic, but some things can't be avoided (like hormones amping things up). It's definitely not an easy road, but I've been able to navigate my individual personalities to find a living situation that works for everyone. I am sometimes envious of people with single species flocks though :)
 

Penny_

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8/18/18
Messages
9
My worry would be with beak size differences first. Your amazon could really hurt a conure sized bird. I think we would need more information on how the birds would be housed and interacted with. Are you ready for separate out times as an example? If you have your amazon on you and the conure flies over what would you do if they started fighting? Do either of the birds like other birds?
Thanks for responding!

Yes! Beak size is a concern. We have a 5 yr old green cheek and the Amazon is 3. All birds are housed separaretly with their own play stands. My current two can be out together on their own spaces, but we do not allow them to interact directly. I can handle separate out times, but am hopeful a similar arrangement will work. I am prepared for it not to. Having a husband helps facilitate this too.

We have a step-up stick in the event the conure flies over. It has happened before when she got spooked. She immediately tried to bully the Amazon, so he doesn't like her in his space. They have never physically fought, are never left alone out, and the invader quickly steps up on the stick I keep within reaching distance. The Amazon has never flown over, but is trained to immediately step up to it.

The do talk to eachother all day long, and from afar do seem to enjoy eachother. They speak back and forth in English and squawks. They call for eachother if one is out of the room. They can be close enough that I can shower with them both in my small shower on their separate stands with everyone happy and singing to the music.
 
Last edited:

Penny_

Moving in
Joined
8/18/18
Messages
9
I agree the size difference is potentially a significant issue and adds complexity and risk that must be managed.


This is somewhat hopeful on the surface -- it'd be more worrisome if the bigger bird was overly bonded (leading to aggression), but it sounds like you've got some healthy independence in your Amazon. That doesn't remove the risk of mixed sizes, but might make it more manageable.

Conures don't appear to know they're small, or care, and this created some very scary situations until mine learned to keep distance from my Severe.

How long has your Amazon been an only bird?

My Severe was an only bird for 10 years (the majority of his life), and his skills for living in a flock aren't developed. I'll add that he was re-homed because he chased the previous family's grandkids (something that I didn't think would be an issue in my child-free home, but he still exhibits this behaviour toward my other birds -- large and small).

Conversely, I adopted a Military who had other macaws as flock mates and he is skillful at navigating flock dynamics.

My experience with these varied sizes coexisting (not harmoniously) is that it comes down to how aggressive or passive each member is. None of mine interact directly, and that would be fine and easy if that was the end of it. My Severe complicates the mix because his aggression causes him to sometimes chase the other two (increasing difficulty). My Conure and Military respond by flying away from the Severe (reducing difficulty). With this, it's easy to see how it'd be more far more challenging to manage if multiple birds were aggressive, or if some didn't deescalate.

Over time you can learn what triggers aggression to help manage the dynamic, but some things can't be avoided (like hormones amping things up). It's definitely not an easy road, but I've been able to navigate my individual personalities to find a living situation that works for everyone. I am sometimes envious of people with single species flocks though :)
Thank you for your response! I absolutely recognize the size difference.

He is quite an independent boy. He likes to show off and show me his tricks mostly. He does ask for head pats sometimes, but it never lasts long, he has things to do and toys to destroy.

My fearless Green Cheek has no idea she is smaller than the Amazon. He has never been the only bird, he is 3, the cheek is 5.

The Amazon is more nervous, he defends the things that are his: stand and cage, but is otherwise shy and timid. My Conure will steal a chip off of a stranger's plate if I let her. Mine do not interact directly either. They do flock call for eachother and interact from their respective spaces all day long though.
 
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