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Should I get an African Grey?

Discussion in 'African Grey Alley' started by Erestyl, 3/9/17.

  1. Tyrion

    Tyrion Rollerblading along the road I Can't Stop Posting!

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    Annette Thompson
    My grey is my heart bird ...Tyrion is very smart loving and loves new things ....I have had him coming on three years since he was 4 months old ...he has never had issues with new things ..never been scared of life ...has always taken our lifestyle as it comes ...whether its been stuck in his cage for a time or out of the cage like he should be ..he is very easy going ...he is a great talker ...not so good at flying due to me being over careful and clipping him when I should of let him fledge ...but hes learning ...hes a very good eater loves almost everything I put in front of him ...loves to be with me or plays by himself ...we have tons of fun learning new songs and words ..it takes him about 3 weeks to learn a new song about a week to learn a new word ...if you are really thinking about a grey I couldnt say more about it ...I wouldnt change my decision about getting Tyrion ..I love him to death ..I think greys are great birds to have and if I could Id have another :)
     
    rockybird, MARILYN CEDENO and faislaq like this.
  2. atomicfriday

    atomicfriday Walking the driveway Celebirdy of the Month

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    I apologize if I came off like I was implying anyone felt birds were inferior, I was just speaking what was on my mind at the time :D just that humans in general have this complex that we are the best at everything! In reality we are so clueless, and the birds have no issues pointing that out hehe.

    To the OP, I know how overwhelmed you are feeling at this point. When I decided I wanted a parrot, I read everything I could under the sun. I decided on a pionus, I ended up with a Bronze Wing and she was so incredibly wonderful in every way. I will always mourn her untimely loss, always. I was set on another pionus until Toby landed in my lap, and I also love him to pieces. I had volunteered some time also at a local animal rescue that normally only deals with cats and dogs but a friend of theirs had suddenly passed in a motorcycle accident and so they took in his three parrots. An Umbrella Cockatoo, and two macaws. They were so happy to have me there to help with the birds, as the other volunteers had zero interest in them. Please let us know what you are thinking, and how your bird search is coming :)
     
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  3. Jaguar

    Jaguar Rollerblading along the road Avenue Spotlight Award Shutterbugs' Best

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    Ry
    My 0.02...

    When you really want something, it's easy to convince you any decision is the right one. Especially with so many people saying 'go with your gut' or 'you felt a connection, get the bird'. The reality is we get kind of blindsided by our desires - it's very difficult to say no, even when there's glaring red flags.

    Don't limit yourself to one particular species - pretty much all of them are going to sound perfect. Just look around for a while. Visit some birds. Rehomes, rescues, babies, whatever there is. Just try not to make a decision on the first visit - usually a rescue would not let you do a same day adoption anyways.

    Good luck :)
     
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  4. LaSelva

    LaSelva Jogging around the block

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    It's a tricky subject.

    I'm sure it can be argued that subconsciously we DO feel they are inferior. They are legal property, after all, and that pretty much trumps everything. Realistically speaking we, as a whole, deem other life to be "lower life forms," (religion fights to keep it this way). Regardless of the lip service people pay to supposedly feeling that other lives (parrots) are sentient, intelligent, or that they are "owned" by their birds. It's not to criticize anyone but in light of how we treat them it's a false humility. Who would cage a creature, make it an entertainer, diminish it's life, refrain from understanding it for what it is, consider it intelligent ONLY when that intelligence comes through in human language (mirroring our vanity), try to teach them to be more human in our homes (i.e. parent/child hierarchy), etc. Humanity as a whole is guilty of this, but I don't think well meaning pet owners are exempt, myself included. We can't help it because our senses are limited and we tend to default to what we know - giving other life a human mindset and outlook on it's state. In cracking the code of their inner world it takes a great amount of research to learn just a little bit of fascinating information. And this will only slowly trickle it's way into the world of pet keeping. If ever, because such research continually calls into question the ethics of how we treat them (and some don't want to be "told" what to do, legally or ethically). As such research helped put an end to circus elephants as well as orcas bred for entertainment...and will likely continue to have similar results. So, there is resistance to the idea that we, humans, are just another life form. And that we share a kinship with all life on this planet that, although sharing a common origin, has radiated outward into different worlds.
     
    Last edited: 3/15/17
  5. LaSelva

    LaSelva Jogging around the block

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    To the OP, the truth is you simply can't predict "perfect" no matter how much you research.

    All the pros and cons you hear, all the YouTube videos, and various experiences from forum members will all amount to the above line.

    The underlying principle of success is your attitude no matter which species you go with.
     
  6. atomicfriday

    atomicfriday Walking the driveway Celebirdy of the Month

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    I agree with you LaSelva. Empathy only goes so far, and we only know life as we know it just like from the point of view of any other life form. If our birds lived the lives they were meant to, I believe not a single one would choose the path with us.
     
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  7. Amillio

    Amillio Sprinting down the street

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    My first parrot ever was a grey. I fell in love with my neighbors parrot and he ended up giving it to me because he got divorced and was working all the time. Although I was fascinated by beans I was also terrified. She entertained the heck out of me tho and I read several books to find out how to best care for her. The old neighbor had her on a seeded diet and she only had one toy in her cage. It took awhile but I finally got her on pellets and she will eat some fruits and vegetables now. It took over six months to get her to eat the pellets. I was afraid of her but earned her trust and learned to read her body language. She is around 12 now and doing grea and she lets me give her head skritches almost every night. She will also let anyone i hand her to hold her and will take treats from people. She will fly to me and a few other people she likes including my niece too.

    I did end up getting a second grey, a male, as a baby. He is needier and wants to be with me all the time. He will be two in June. Him and beans tolereate each other and communicate back and forth. Both greys have been a joy to own. My mom however has a blue crown conure and it drives me insane. I can't stand how it squawks. My birds talk and make sound but don't squawk regularly. If you are willing to do the work and research before you get anything you can end up with a great parrot regardless of what you go with. Try to see some adult and babies of what you are interested and see what you think. You might even be able to volunteer at a rescue. Also no that with most parrots it takes time to earn their trust.
     
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  8. Abigail

    Abigail Rollerblading along the road

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    I'm sure you've received plenty of responses but I thought I'd leave a few thoughts of my own since you seem like you are trying to do plenty of research (kudos for that!) Digby is my African Grey, he is almost 6 years old and I've had him since he was 3. He was babied by the person who had him before me (the original owner) up until him and his boyfriend had a traumatic breakup. During that time he experienced a small amount of neglect, but it likely came as a shock to Digby because of how he was so use to so much attention. On top of that, there was an extremely high level of stress surrounding that breakup. He began plucking and to this day still plucks, despite the enormous and constant efforts my husband and I have put into improving his care, keeping him healthy, keeping his brain busy, trying different methods to stop the habit. He can get very anxious, he's had what I would call full-blown anxiety attacks before. There are times he becomes so anxious (over mainly small things, mind you, like us being in the room but not looking at him/paying attention to him.) he'll rapidly rip out feathers in beakfulls. It's stressful and painful to watch him suffer like this mentally. He's a good, smart boy but psychologically he's damaged, and unless there was something more serious that happened in his last home that I don't know about, it really didn't take much to put him in this seemingly permanent state. African Greys are prone to this kind of behavior, this kind of timidness and anxiety and also the plucking and self mutilation. Given proper care and attention, this shouldn't be a situation you have with a Grey. But I wanted to lay out what we deal with on a regular basis, especially if you are interested in a rescue bird who might have some of these problems due to abuse or neglect. When my husband and I first moved in together and Digby came with me, it was his first experience owning a bird. He was shocked to learn how extremely complex and how huge of a commitment they are. They become part of your life like a child would.

    Best of luck and do lots of research!
     
  9. atomicfriday

    atomicfriday Walking the driveway Celebirdy of the Month

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    I wanted to add to Abigail's post, as Toby went through almost an identical situation before I got him. He too grew up with a gay couple, became neglected by them, and developed a plucking habit. He continues to pluck despite being an otherwise content and happy parrot. I believe it is an ingrained, nervous habit that he will in all likelihood never quit. I do not mind his patchiness as he is otherwise such a joy to have around, but of course I wish he would take care of himself better for his sake.
     

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