1. Welcome to Avian Avenue! To view our forum with less advertisments please register with us.
    Memberships are free and it will just take a moment. Click here

Permits for all wild animals, (Even Parrots)?

Discussion in 'Other Than Feathers Speedway' started by Sylvester, 7/11/18.

  1. Sylvester

    Sylvester Jogging around the block

    Joined:
    7/12/17
    Messages:
    978
    My state has recently passed a law that makes it mandatory to obtain a permit for owning a wild animal. Before this residents of my state could own lions, tigers, bears, (oh my). The person must take classes on being a responsible owner, have the right facility, and pay over a chunk of money.

    I have always thought, personally, that snake owners should be made to obtain a permit.

    But what do you think?

    Do you think all wild animals warrant this step?

    How about parrots? Gotcha.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Erikalynnha

    Erikalynnha Jogging around the block

    Joined:
    3/22/17
    Messages:
    611
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    Real Name:
    Erika
    I think you should have to get a permit and take classes for certain animals. Did you ever watch Fatal Attraction Animals? It was about people who ended up injured or killed by the wild animals they kept. Very good series BTW! My best friends boyfriend is rehabbing raccoons right now and everyone we know is in awe and wants one as a pet. She said she wishes she did more research on them as she wasn't prepare for the level of destruction they unleash on her house. She said bf would have had to find another place to care for them had she known. I think people are often atractted to the "wild" and "exotic" aspect (or in her cause awwwww cute baby fluffers who can do no harm) then the fact that these animals need a lot of care. At least wit a permit and courses people might be better prepared then just an impulse buy.

    Smaller snakes shouldn't require a permit but the larger ones definitely should require permits and classes to own them. People often get over their heads and release them after they get to big which is very sad :(
     
  3. Sylvester

    Sylvester Jogging around the block

    Joined:
    7/12/17
    Messages:
    978
    Regarding the snakes, it is very sad. Florida is full of pythons because of irresponsible people. Just last year in my hometown a teenager placed his 21 foot python in a public park because he thought it was dead. A couple came across it while jogging, and it was very much alive. Now what if a dog, cat, or God forbid, a small child had happened upon the reptile?

    That is so nice that your friend is helping those raccoons. My brother acquired a baby raccoon when he was in his teens. He traded his mini bike for it. And your best friend is right, they are a handful.
     
    BirdField, Sarahmoluccan and CrowCall like this.
  4. Erikalynnha

    Erikalynnha Jogging around the block

    Joined:
    3/22/17
    Messages:
    611
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    Real Name:
    Erika
    I didn't pay attention to the parrot part! I would be all for classes that teach proper housing and need requirements especially for larger parrots. Kinda like a lot of rescues do before adopting!
     
  5. camelotshadow

    camelotshadow Joyriding the Neighborhood Celebirdy of the Month Avenue Veteran

    Joined:
    11/8/11
    Messages:
    16,893
    Location:
    S California
    Whats wild? Bred in captivity may not be considered wild. So are parrots wild?

    I agree a neighbor keeping tigers & bears should file some plans on how they will be kept & the safety precaution & of course they have to be zoned to keep such animals. Can't really tame birds either but most of them can't kill & eat you or seriously maim you. Large birds can cause servere injury though! What about pit bulls? They are responsible for something like 50% of the injuries from dogs. They are not "wild".

    Depends on the area etc even chickens are not allowed...they are not wild...just safety & health concerns.

    They don't allow these exotic animals on normal home properties unless they are a few acres or zoned farm etc.



    We live in an imperfect world with imperfect people some of which are not fit to have animals or even raise a child
    but have the right to do so!




     
    Last edited: 7/11/18
    Hankmacaw and Sylvester like this.
  6. Sylvester

    Sylvester Jogging around the block

    Joined:
    7/12/17
    Messages:
    978
    LOL! That is the part I was hoping would stand out, since this is a parrot forum. :)

    I couldn't agree more. I bought a male U2 last summer and I love him, but if I knew then, what I know now, I doubt I would have gotten him.
     
  7. Sylvester

    Sylvester Jogging around the block

    Joined:
    7/12/17
    Messages:
    978
     
  8. Erikalynnha

    Erikalynnha Jogging around the block

    Joined:
    3/22/17
    Messages:
    611
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    Real Name:
    Erika
    I hear snakes and crocodilians are often responsible for dog and cat disappearances in Florida. If you are caught releaseing a animal in the wild you once owned, there should be a fine.

    Actually labs and chihuahuas have the highest bite rating I believe. Its just easier to make pitties (use to be called The Nanny Dogs ^-^) the bad guy. Annnnd let me add that I don't care how small chihuahuas or any other small puppers teeth is! A bite is a bite! My first dog bite that sent me to the hospital was from a freaking toy poodle -_-
     
  9. Sylvester

    Sylvester Jogging around the block

    Joined:
    7/12/17
    Messages:
    978
     
    Sarahmoluccan and Erikalynnha like this.
  10. JLcribber

    JLcribber Joyriding the Neighborhood Celebirdy of the Month Mayor of the Avenue Avenue Spotlight Award Avenue Veteran Shutterbugs' Best

    Joined:
    10/16/09
    Messages:
    19,104
    Location:
    Alberta, Canada
    Real Name:
    John
    Sounds like your state is forward thinking. As more should be. :)
     
  11. camelotshadow

    camelotshadow Joyriding the Neighborhood Celebirdy of the Month Avenue Veteran

    Joined:
    11/8/11
    Messages:
    16,893
    Location:
    S California
    Well think there is a rule 3 attacks by a dog who bites & they can be euthanized. Still most people/children bitten by the fierce toy dogs are not seriously maimed or killed but I suppose mental trauma is mental trauma & best to not get bit at all. Still people have dogs & if they let them close enough to others there can be problems.

    I still would rather get bit by a Chihuahua than a pit bull.

    Sorry to pick on the pitbull but I have an issue with one now. I live in a building with a no dog policy which is fine with me as I don't have to hear the barking & step in poo. I'm quite sensitive to the pitbull drama as my new neighbors boyfriend has a pitbull & he submitted ESA paperwork so he is entitled to an ESA animal & we have to allow him to visit with his dog even though the building has a no dog policy even as a visitor! We have small children who run & play in the courtyard.

    They have beat pitbulls over the head with a sticks & shovels & they still will not let go of its prey.
    I really don;t think I should have to be forced to have one walk past me while I'm getting my mail or entering or leaving
    my apartment & they are not even the tenants dog but the law requires that we have to cater to a tenants guest who has a disability & make them feel at home when they visit which would include their ESA animal. ESA animals don't have to have any special training or qualifications. They consider a pet monkey, pig, duck, a whole lists on animals many of which are less dangerous than a pitbull. So maybe even tiger can be considered a ESA animal? Where does it end?


    We can't do anything until the dog injures someone or is proven dangerous...yes the disabled have more rights now...
     
    Sylvester and Hankmacaw like this.
  12. Mizzely

    Mizzely Joyriding the Neighborhood Celebirdy of the Month Mayor of the Avenue Avenue Spotlight Award Avenue Veteran Vendor BINGO CHAMPION

    Joined:
    8/9/11
    Messages:
    20,367
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    Real Name:
    Shawna
    In my state, in order to have certain (wild) animals, you have to be able to prove that you have a suitable enclosure, and you have certain laws you have to follow. For instance, I wanted a pet skunk, but in order to do so I had to have at minimum a 8x4x4 enclosure with a denning box of at least 2x2x2, with an additional 16 square feet per additional animal. They also require several logs at least 2 foot by 6 inches thick for enrichment.

    Now, I am in favor of that. It means I cannot currently have a skunk. Which sucks because my great aunt had one and I loved it. But if I cannot meet its basic needs, then I shouldn't have one.

    Same with parrots.

    "One of the most tolerant, patient, gentle breed of dogs is now being portrayed as the most dangerous. Because of this bad reputation, at least 6,000 pit bulls are put to death every day, by far the highest number of any other breed. Before the pit bulls were being notarized as the most aggressive dog breed, it was the Rottweiler, before that, it was the Doberman and the German Shepherd. Each time, people wanted to enforce laws to ban these dogs. Each time, this notoriety was proven wrong. It’s the same with the American Pit Bull.

    In temperance tests, given by the American Temperance Test Society, the pit bull rated as the second MOST TOLERANT. The most tolerant dog breed was the Golden Retriever. The least tolerant was the Chihuahua. It has been said that the pit bull’s jaws will lock on and won't turn loose. It has also been stated that they have the most powerful bite among dog breeds. Neither one of these statements are true. Pit Bull’s jaws do not lock and the dog with the most powerful bite is actually proven to be the Rottweiler."



    I have met many, many pitbulls and never been bitten by one. They are some of the sweetest dogs ever. If I were in the market for a dog, pit bull would be on my short list because they ARE so good with children.


    Pitbulls Were Once Known as “Nanny Dogs.” What Happened? | PetHelpful
     
    Last edited: 7/11/18
  13. analliecat

    analliecat Strolling the yard

    Joined:
    7/3/18
    Messages:
    136
    Real Name:
    allie
    to be honest, i do wish exotic pets had some type of permit and that there were laws/fines that were more aggressively enforced related to releasing exotic animals out in the wild.

    i work at a pet store and i regularly deny sales to people who are uneducated. most of the time people listen to my advice and do more research, but if they know nothing and don’t intend on attempting to learn about the creatures they’re purchasing, i will deny the sale. i’m tired of being brought dead animals that would’ve lived if more effort was put into learning about them.
     
  14. camelotshadow

    camelotshadow Joyriding the Neighborhood Celebirdy of the Month Avenue Veteran

    Joined:
    11/8/11
    Messages:
    16,893
    Location:
    S California
    Sure there are good pitbulls & they don't get the publicity. Still the statistics do seem to advise caution.

    All Dog Bite Statistics

    Really don't want to make it a pitbull issue but it all has to do with the breeding bloodline. Just alot of backyard breeders breeding pitbulls from dogs with bad temperment.
    You can get bad german shepherds too. A german shepherd & rottweiller can do alot of damage too as well as all large working dogs that are bred for guarding.

    I've had alot of german shepherds & they were great dogs with the family & would just sit & have there tails & ears pulled. Still they would bite someone who walked inside the gate without an invitation.
     
    Sylvester likes this.
  15. painesgrey

    painesgrey Rollerblading along the road

    Joined:
    10/17/15
    Messages:
    1,051
    Location:
    WA
    Real Name:
    Rachel
    I think ownership permits are a good thing. I wouldn't hesitate to get permits for my birds if they were necessary, even if I had to attend a class.

    I also wish that more schools would offer animal care/husbandry classes. I think teaching children responsibility and empathy early on would help reduce a lot of the cruelty and ignorance that is so prevalent.
     
  16. Mizzely

    Mizzely Joyriding the Neighborhood Celebirdy of the Month Mayor of the Avenue Avenue Spotlight Award Avenue Veteran Vendor BINGO CHAMPION

    Joined:
    8/9/11
    Messages:
    20,367
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    Real Name:
    Shawna



    Not to mention make pet stores give better information :/
     
  17. CrowCall

    CrowCall Sprinting down the street

    Joined:
    7/11/18
    Messages:
    342
    Location:
    Colorado
    Real Name:
    Trinity
    I REALLY have to agree. I volunteer at a dog and cat shelter that gets a lot of pit bulls and I have not yet met a pit with a mean bone in it's body. I would trust one around even an infant!
     
  18. Erikalynnha

    Erikalynnha Jogging around the block

    Joined:
    3/22/17
    Messages:
    611
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    Real Name:
    Erika
    I agree! Worked with animals for 11 years I love me a goofy, dorky pittie!

    I think the problem with the statistics involving Pitbull biting is any dog that looks like a "pitt" is lump into that number. I have seen labs label as pitt mixes because they had square heads and shorter bodys not to mention other dogs with similar features that do not have pitt DNA in them at all. Definitely not fair as it gives a breed a bad name.
     
  19. painesgrey

    painesgrey Rollerblading along the road

    Joined:
    10/17/15
    Messages:
    1,051
    Location:
    WA
    Real Name:
    Rachel

    The problem with pet stores - and I've worked in a couple different ones - is that there's a weird dichotomy between wanting what's best for the animal, and still making the business profitable.

    The one that I worked in that was genuinely mindful of the animals eventually went out of business. They gave us books to read up on proper husbandry of the animals we sold, and we also gave these books to people who bought animals from us. Gave. Free of charge.

    On the other hand, the sh!thole that would use the sale of animals solely as an opportunity to upsell supplies is still in business. The owner has outdated and flawed ideas on proper animal husbandry, and required that animals be sold with certain items even if they weren't really in the animal's best interest. For example: all birds had to be sold with the House Proprietary Blend (read: bags of food that mice had chewed open) of parrot food, or Kaytee Forti-Diet. Client wanted another food? Nope, gotta buy one of those foods, or you're not buying the animal. It didn't matter that I knew that pellets were a healthier alternative, if I didn't do "my job" then I was out of one. Looking back now I should've left sooner, but when you're struggling to pay rent that's not always an option.


    Basically, there are a lot of well-meaning pet stores and employees out there. Unfortunately, their business model isn't always the most lucrative and that's why, perhaps, they're not as common as the alternative.
     
  20. Mizzely

    Mizzely Joyriding the Neighborhood Celebirdy of the Month Mayor of the Avenue Avenue Spotlight Award Avenue Veteran Vendor BINGO CHAMPION

    Joined:
    8/9/11
    Messages:
    20,367
    Location:
    Northern Michigan
    Real Name:
    Shawna


    If the product isn't profitable, the real response should be to not sell that product (live animals). Not to make it so that the animal suffers :(
     
    BirdField and Lady Jane like this.

Users Viewing Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 0)