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Perch wood question

Discussion in 'DIY Drive' started by ferretowner96, 3/15/13.

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  1. ferretowner96

    ferretowner96 Moving in

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    Rick
    Hello. I have an Amazon and am working on natural perches. Instead of buying 15 dollar ones, I was thinking about cutting some off trees. I live on a farm and have an orchard, so we have sassafras, apple, peach, plum, cherry...we have a lot lol Is it ok to use one of these trees for perches? I can't find a "safe tree list" lol if so, should I remove the bark, or let her chew it off?
    Thanks,
    Rick
     
  2. ferretowner96

    ferretowner96 Moving in

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    Also, would these be ok to use in toy building for her?
    Thanks,
    Rick
     
  3. expressmailtome

    expressmailtome Ripping up the road Administrator Celebirdy of the Month Mayor of the Avenue Avenue Veteran

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  4. Katy

    Katy Cruising the avenue Mayor of the Avenue

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    Hi- I searched the archives and came up with this. Bad list followed by safe list. Good luck! Natural perches are great for your birds. If you want to find the whole thread and the responses, put toxic list in the search field.


    TOXIC Wood




    ALDER - red alder -see Alder Buckthorn paragraph
    ANDROMEDA -Pieris, Lily of the Valley shrub
    APRICOT
    ARROWHEAD VINE
    AUSTRALIAN FLAME TREE
    AUSTRALIAN UMBRELLA TREE
    AVACADO
    AZALEA - Related to Rhododendron
    BANEBERRY - Actaea
    BEANS -castor, horse, fava, broad, glory, scarlet runner
    BLACK LOCUST - Robinia
    BOX ELDER
    BOXWOOD - Buxus
    BUCKTHORN - Cascara / Alder Buckthorn - see chapter
    BRACKEN FERN
    BURDOCK
    CACAO
    CAMEL BUSH - Trichodesma
    CANARY BIRD BUSH - Crotalaria
    CANNABIS
    CASTOR BEAN
    CEDAR - Thuja, Chamaecyparis, Cupressus
    CHALICE - trumpet vine
    CHERRY see comments below
    CHINA BERRY TREE - Melia / Texas umbrella tree
    CHINESE MAGNOLIA - uncertain for safety
    CHINESE POPCORN / TALLOW
    CHINESE SNAKE TREE - Laquer plant
    COMMON SAGE
    CORIANDER - Cilantro
    DATURA
    DAPHNE - it's the berries
    DATURA STRAMONIUM - Brugmansia - angel's trumpet
    DIEFFENBACHIA
    ELDERBERRY
    EUONYMUS - Includes burning bush and more
    EUPHORBIA
    FELT PLANT - Kalancho baharensis
    FLAME TREE
    FIRETHORN - Pyracantha
    FLAME TREE - Brachychiton / Sterculia
    FOXGLOVE - Digitalis (pharmaceutical source)
    GOLDEN CHAIN TREE - Laburnum
    GROUND CHERRY
    CROWN OF THORNS
    HEATHS
    HEMLOCK - Tsuga
    HOLLY - Ilex
    HONEY LOCUST - Gleditsia
    HORSE CHESTNUT - Aesculus
    HUCKLEBERRY - leaves bad: evergreen & deciduous
    HYDRANGEA
    JASMINE
    JUNIPER - Juniperus
    KALMIA: also called Mountain Laurel
    KENTUCKY COFFEE TREE
    LANTANA - red sage
    LAUREL - Prunus
    LEUCOTHOE
    LUPINE
    MANGO - (fruit okay: not wood or leaves)
    MEXICAN BREADFRUIT
    MOCK ORANGE
    MONSTERA - big hunker of a house plant
    MOUNTAIN LAUREL - Kalmia latifolia
    MYRTLE - broadleaf evergreen, not crape myrtle
    NECTARINE
    NUTMEG
    OAK - Quercus - all parts / tannins
    MISTLETOE
    OLEANDER
    PEACH
    PEAR - some sources lean toward safe
    PENCILTREE
    PITCH PINE
    PLUM
    PRARIE OAK - safety uncertain
    PRIVET
    RAIN TREE
    RED MAPLE - see Maple paragraph
    RED SAGE - Lantana
    REDWOOD - Sequiadendron, Metasequoia, Sequoia
    RHODODENDRON
    RHUBARB
    SAND BOX TREE - sap was used to poison fish
    SOLANUM - Jerusalem cherry or pepino
    SOPHORA - includes Japanese pagoda tree
    SUMAC - not all sumacs are bad: see paragraphs
    TOBACCO
    TANSY
    TOMATO
    UMBRELLA TREE
    WALNUT
    WEEPING FIG - Ficus benjamina > Ficus elastica safe
    WHITE CEDAR - China
    WITCH HAZEL - Hamamelis
    WISTERIA
    YEW - Taxus






    Safe Wood




    ACACIA - Silk Tree would be in this group
    APPLE -
    (Insecticide residue likely cause
    for periodic issues)
    AILANTHUS - Tree of Heaven
    ALDER - white alder -
    (See paragraph about
    Alder / Buckthorn)
    ALMOND
    ARALIA - Fatsia japonica
    ASH - Fraxinus
    ASPEN - Populus
    BAMBOO
    BARBERRY- Berberis
    BIRCH - see paragraph
    BEECH - Fagus
    BOIS D'ARC - horse apple tree
    BOTTLE BRUSH
    BUTTERFLY BUSH
    CAMELLIA
    CITRUS -
    (lime, kumquat, grapefruit, orange, lemon)
    CORK -
    (not wood from cork oak, but cork)
    CORN PLANTS
    COTTONWOOD - Populus
    CRABAPPLE - Malus
    CRAPE MYRTLE -
    (not the same as myrtle)
    DATE
    DOGWOOD - Cornus
    DOUGLAS FIR - Pseudotsuga
    DRACAENA
    ELM - Ulmus
    ESCALLONIA
    EUCALYPTUS
    FIG
    FIR - genus Abies
    GINKGO
    GRAPE VINES
    GRAPE PALM
    GUAVA
    HACKBERRY
    HAWTHORN - Crataegus
    HIBISCUS
    HICKORY
    IRONWOOD - apparently toxic leaves
    JADE PLANT
    KALANCHOE
    LARCH - Larix
    LILAC - Syringa
    MADRONA / MADRONE - Arbutus
    MAGNOLIA
    MAPLE - Acer - see Maple Paragraph
    MANZANITA - Arctostaphylos
    MESQUITE - remove sharp parts
    MIMOSA
    MOCK ORANGE - Phladelphus
    MOUNTAIN ASH - Sorbus
    MULBERRY - Morus
    NANDINA -common name is heavenly bamboo
    NORFOLK ISLAND PINE - Araucaria
    NUT TREES - exclude chestnut
    ORANGE - several sources lean toward safe
    OREGON GRAPE - Mahonia
    PALM
    PAPAYA
    PEAR
    PECAN
    PINE - Pinus: see Pine paragraph below
    PHOTINIA
    POPLAR - Populus
    ***** WILLOW - Salix
    RAPHIOLEPSIS - Indian Hawthorn
    RIBBONWOOD
    ROSE - Rosa
    RUBBER PLANT - Ficus elastica - Weeping Fig in bad column
    RUSSIAN OLIVE
    SASSAFRAS
    SILK TREE
    SPIRAEA
    SPRUCE - Picea
    STAGHORN SUMAC - see Sumac paragraph
    STRAWBERRY TREE - Arbutus like Madrone
    SWEET GUM
    SYCAMORE
    THURLOW
    TREE FERN
    VIBURNUM
    VINE MAPLE - Acer
    WEEPING WILLOW - Salix
    WIEGELA
    YUCCA


    ** NOTES **






    Lumber wood information




    Pressure injected wood: don’t use it for birds: perches, toys or structures. Also, if you find lumber, do you know what contacted it? It's like an unbroken chain of possession for evidence.


    If you left lumber in a shed that several people use and haven’t been there for a year, how do you know what may have spilled? What kind of dust settled? Most light pine lumber in stores is not coated with anything. But ask anyway. Pre-cut stakes, such as those used for surveying, may have been coated due to the need to remain in the ground. We can’t be certain 100% of the time, but every piece of information brings us nearer 100% accuracy.




    A square edge perch is not a good. You could remove square edges, and round wood is better. Natural branches are the best because the diameter differs from small to large, allowing birds feet to stretch and contract.








    Aromatic Substances


    Refer to other bird sites for aromatic info. But I'm leaving this comment about Teflon. Switch from Teflon pans to something like stainless steel or cast iron. Teflon pans over-heating, can emit substances deadly to birds. We try to keep perfume, aromatic scents and colognes to an absolute minimum at our home.






    Check plant names: For our lists, or others, check common names to know the genus, scientific name and common name. For example, Douglas fir is not a fir. Western cedar is not a cedar.








    Balsa Wood: This is our birds favorite to play with. Most sources indicate that balsa is safe for birds. I contacted avian veterinarians in Oregon and California, and got the same feedback - that balsa wood is fine. You won’t want balsa for a perch. A cockatiel can chew through balsa in minutes.








    Cleaning Wood: One philosophy says clean bird perch wood before it’s used by soaking for an hour or two in tub of water with a cap of household bleach. Then rinse the wood in clean water. Another says Chlorine bleach may cause an occasional sickness or fatality. Maybe due to too strong of a solution. The second philosophy may use mild soap and water solution followed by rinsing with clean water. Both viewpoints agree about allowing wood to dry thoroughly, including exposed to direct sunlight. Oven drying needs to be hot enough to kill microbes, but cool enough to avoid combustion.


    ALDER is not ALDER BUCKTHORN & the 2 alders




    This update was due to concern about a substance Cascara sagrada acting as a laxative. That stuff is made from bark of Buckthorn. It has a common name Alder Buckthorn. But it is not an Alder or Alnus, whereas Buckthorn is Rhamnus purshiana. To my knowledge, real Alder has no Cascara sagrada in it.Red Alder - on a USDA Forest Service Pacific NW lumber page, was a footnote for red alder "Toxicity: can cause dermatitis".
    Red alder is not the only alder we have in Oregon. There is also Alnus rhombifolia called white alder. A source about white alder for use by Ohlone Indians, said they used white alder for diarrhea. Conclusion: Red Alder should be avoided.




    BIRCH COMMENTS - The following comments are a PARAPHRASE from Gillian Willis - author - with clarification:






    Birch is Betula species. LEAVES & BARK contain salicylates and a few substances ... . The low concentration ... Birch should be considered safe for natural wood perches. The seeds inside the cones are a special goodie safe for birds to eat. (end of paraphrase) Think: Automobile fumes can be damaging. We don't want to be enclosed where the fumes are trapped. But walking down the street where those fumes are in the air at low concentrations, we feel safe to breath. As noted, Birch should be considered safe and the risk of leaving bark is inconsequential




    CHERRY COMMENTS - Some sources debate about cherry wood being bad to pet birds, for a lack of substantial confirmed cases - although confirmed cases of problems for a few dogs and horses is apparent. Some folks lean toward using cherry wood, but not the bark, under the premise that the chemicals are primarily in the cambium - layer under the bark. Do you know what that layer is? Do you see what I'm getting at here? When there are an abundance of sure safe woods, why use one that has bark with potential bad stuff in it?




    Suppose there are no confirmed cases of dead birds from cherry. If cherry turns out to be a subtle problem, would you want your bird to be the first confirmed case? I suspect there are cases not documented. There must be hundreds of birds dying each year due to real causes that we don't know about.




    DRIFTWOOD - Driftwood is not recommended for a few reasons: 1. There is no certainty for the average person about the tree genus. 2. The ocean water environment contains organisms not to mention every kind of animal waste in addition to residue from ships. It is an uncertain environment. 3. Driftwood can have high salt content. Imagine all the crud that embeds into that wood.




    LARCH or DAWN REDWOOD? - Larch is in the safe wood list. In case you did not know it, Larch is a deciduous conifer. It looses it's needles in winter. The needles are attached in little clusters on pegs like little tufts. There is another tree






    Dawn Redwood which is also a deciduous conifer. It's needles are attached to the twigs individually and somewhat two-ranked on either side of the twig. Initially, new spring growth looks like little tufts, but these elongate into tiny mini-twigs lined with ranks of individual needles. Dawn Redwood is not on the list above. It's genus is Metasequoia (sp. glyptostroboides). Avoid using Dawn Redwood - feel free to use limbs from Larch (Larix).




    MAPLE - Originally, this page only listed two maple trees: vine maple as safe, and red maple as potentially harmful. I've included "maple" in the safe list now, but with this condition: remove the bark. It may not be absolutely neccessary, but its the only way that I'll suggest most of that tree genus. From what I've read, the bark of many maple trees, like vine maple or Japanese maple, etc., is fine. Meaning, the bark in itself is not deemed a problem. But red maple (Acer rubrum) can harbor a fungus. Inhalation of exuded residue may be harmful. Maple wood - in general - should be safe for natural wood bird perches once bark is removed.




    One source wrote that "red maple" is bad for horses, not really specifying why. Currently, I'd use almost any maple branch for a bird toy or perch.




    PINE - We read an article about Pine and Cedar containing compounds that can cause lung or sinus problems. But the article was about BEDDING like shavings put in bottoms of animal cages; more common for hampsters and other pets; rarely for parrots or cockatiels.




    When we listed pine above, that's meant as perch wood, which this page is geared for. Also be certain that the pine for bird perches is dry pine that aged for as much as a year or two. Otherwise the pitch in the pine will be an awful thing for bird feathers.




    SUMAC / RHUS - One sumac on this page is Staghorn Sumac - a safe tree. It's fruit berries have been clean washed, and made into a good lemonade when sweetened. Native American Indians even mixed it's leaves and fruit with tobacco for smoking. A broad range of plants may be called sumac, some safe, some not.




    Some species in the genus Rhus are potent and can also cause severe skin irritation to some people. Other species like Rhus typhina are not bad. Most naught species have axillary panicles and smooth fruits. The okay species have upright, dense, conical drupe type fruits, covered with crimson hairs.


    The Above list is from : Bird; Birds: Safe, Toxic Trees, Woods. Safe Tree Wood. Parrots. Parrot cages.
     
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  5. PortaPerch

    PortaPerch Walking the driveway

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    I tend to question the validity of this list when it misspell names of woods like Avocado.
     
  6. Chantilly Lace

    Chantilly Lace Rollerblading along the road Celebirdy of the Month Avenue Veteran

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  7. EucProducts

    EucProducts Meeting neighbors

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    Woohoo! Eucalyptus is on BOTH of the safe wood lists (above)!
    (but, as Chantel said, beware of pesticides and preservatives, like those sprayed on the silver-dollar Eucs found in florists and grocery-stores!)

    Enjoy your Eucs!
    - Matt
     
  8. Clueless

    Clueless Cruising the avenue Celebirdy of the Month Avenue Spotlight Award

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    Hmmmmm. Never thought about a Eucalyptus perch. When you have a branch as a perch, do you leave the bark on them? Do the birds get sap on their little feet? (no chance the amazons will let me clean a foot!)
     
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