is propane and natural gases safe for parrots?

Discussion in 'Safety Avenue' started by Kygal41501, 3/11/12.

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  1. Kygal41501
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    Kygal41501 Walking the driveway

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    i have a friend who is interested in adopting a bird, and he's been asking me a lot of questions and one in particular was is propane was safe for birds? he has a propane fireplace, and i didn't know what to say. i found one site that said it was safe but just wanted to ask actual bird owners to find out :)
  2. Chicobo
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    Chicobo Rollerblading along the road

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    Well natural gas isn't safe for ANYONE at certain levels, including humans, dogs, cats, birds, etc etc -- but a natural gas leak of any kind WILL cause problems and quickly, death, in birds due to their smaller size and sensitivity to those sorts of agents. (Take teflon, for example -- the amount of gas produced when a teflon pan heats up is not anywhere NEAR fatal to humans, but kills a bird.) A similar example is the use of "miner's canaries" in coal mining many years ago -- a canary would stop singing prior to death when exposed to methane, carbon monoxide, etc. underground, which miners used as a way to keep from over-exposure themselves and avoid mining fatalities. The natural gas we use to heat our homes is partially composed of methane, so a natural gas leak in a home would likely have the same effect.

    Propane, I'm not so sure about. Personally I would not specifically AVOID having a bird in a house with a propane fireplace any more than I would avoid having birds in my home, which uses a methane/natural gas stove with a pilot light. In MY PERSONAL OPINION, the likelihood of a gas leak from my stove (or fireplace) is so low and would so likely kill me, the cat, etc as well that it isn't something I am paranoid about (unlike the use of air fresheners and teflon pans when the kitchen doors are open). We can't possibly avoid EVERY SINGLE BIRDIE HAZARD EVER unless we all had gadzillions of dollars; the main thing I think your friend should consider is how far he can place the bird's cage from that fireplace, how likely a leak is, etc. If it is a situation in which a leak is highly likely and/or the cage would necessarily sit next to the fireplace, I might reconsider. Otherwise, if he is willing to offer a bird a loving home and that is the only major hazard and steps can be taken to mitigate possible danger, I would not say that he shouldn't consider adopting a bird just because of a fireplace.

    My theory has always been to be as rational about fears of causing harm to my pets as possible. I don't use chemical cleaners, I don't cook with teflon pans when I can avoid it, I don't kill pests in my house with poisons. But beyond that, I try not to panic about potential hazards...because if I did, I'd never sleep again!
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  3. omai1953
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    omai1953 coocoo for cockatoos Super Moderator

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    as long as there is not a leak there is no problem I use natural heating and for my stove for years now you should invest in a gas level monitor
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  4. Laurul Feather Cat
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    Laurul Feather Cat Biking along the boulevard

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    I specifically selected propane for heating in my birdroom because of its safety record. The tank is 12 feet from the house and the piping delivering the gas to the house is very durable and is checked twice a year for safety. The propane furnace is inspected every fall before use. I have a smoke and heat detector as well as a carbon monoxide and gas detector in the room. The furnace has been reliable and after adding a small waterfall like humidifyer, I find it a perfect and safe heat source for my birds. With my programable thermostat I have no problem keeping the birdroom at the right temperature in the fall, winter and spring.
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  5. macawpower58
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    macawpower58 Rollerblading along the road Mayor of the Avenue Avenue Spotlight Award

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    My sole source of heat for 15 years in Nevada was propane, and my birds never had a problem with it.
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  6. Kygal41501
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    Kygal41501 Walking the driveway

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    thank you guys so much! i just happened to be talking to him about toxic fumes like teflon and cleaners and he just asked about propane and i had never thought about it so thank you!
  7. Love My Zons
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    Love My Zons Biking along the boulevard Celebirdy of the Month

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    Our house is heated with propane and you cannot smell it it's fast and efficiently burning. Our fireplace is gas logs and the pilot is always lit. We do not use the fireplace often, but will turn it on to get the chill out and run it for a few minutes if it's really cold outside.

    NO issues here with my birds, we have been in this house 5 yrs with no ill effect.

  8. stephwin
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    stephwin Walking the driveway

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    We have a natural gas cooktop and our 2 heaters use it as well. I always turn on the vent when I cook and our house has about a dozen carbon monoxide detectors. We've been here almost 3 years and have had no issues.

    Does he have any detectors in his house that would notify him of a leak? If not, I would suggest installing some. Other than that, like the others have pointed out, I think he should be fine assuming the bird is not placed near the fireplace (the bird would probably overheat as well).
  9. OSUtoo
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    OSUtoo Walking the driveway

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    And yet another thing I'd have never thought of! We've always lived in homes that were 100% electric so I've never thought about gases.

    There was one time a few years back when we had a maaajor ice storm/deep freeze here for about a week. So bad that the power was out all over the area because the ice was tearing down power lines. We were without power for a week (it came back on Christmas morning, which was quite the "Christmas miracle" lol). But anyway, in order to keep our home at a reasonable temperature (we were thinking more of the birds than anything at the time), we brought out our kerosene heater. We didn't have it in the same room as the birds but the air flow was all the same, and they were fine. We even kept them covered some even though the day because we figured it would help hold in the heat better.
  10. Anne & Gang
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    Anne & Gang Riding the Skies Celebirdy of the Month Mayor of the Avenue Avenue Spotlight Award Avian Angel

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    I worked for a fireplace manufactuer for 17 years and I can honestly tell you that propane and natural gas are the safest to use around any birds or animals..or humans....the thing is, most people do not bother to main their fireplaces after purchase..you absolutely must get it serviced once a year by a professional , certified technician..if you do not do this, then you are literally playing with fire....this is a mistake many people make when they purchase a fireplace...and if you go into a place where one already exists, get it looked at and serviced BEFORE you turn it on!!!!!!!
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