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Abundance weaning. Opinions?

Discussion in 'Nursery Rhyme Drive' started by Zara, 5/14/19 at 5:22 AM.

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Should Adelie be cut off from formula?

  1. No

    100.0%
  2. Yes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. Zara

    Zara Rollerblading along the road Avenue Spotlight Award I Can't Stop Posting! POSTAHOLIC

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    Me and Adelie are just home from the vet (I just took her for a check up) and when the vet asked what her diet is now, his face had a look of horror when I told him she is still weaning. The words out of his mouth; ¨muy mal!¨ (Very bad!).
    He says I should cut her off from her morning feed, now. And in one week cut her off from formula all together.

    Adelie is a lovebird who developed and grew slowly, she is now 138 days old (20.5weeks). She has started her first moult. Lovebird weaning starts at around week 5-6 and the bird will be weaned by week 8 ish. Adelie didn´t get introduced to hard food until week 7-8 because she was too small.

    I´m not happy cutting her off cold turkey.
    I told him, that for the last two days she has eaten less in the morning, and today ate little.
    She does eat millet and her seed mix, and nibbles veggies/sprouted beans, lentils.

    Why would I just cut her off now and force her after all this time letting her go at her own pace? I already know that if we do this my way as we have so far, she will highly likely lose the morning feed by the weekend anyway. So why force her for the sake of a few days?

    I´m looking for your thoughts and opinions. What do you think?

    I am planing to stick to my guns, unless someone here tells me why I should do what the vet says, backed up with a document/article.

    I just want to do right by Adelie, and I don´t like going against a vets advice.
     
  2. JLcribber

    JLcribber Joyriding the Neighborhood Celebirdy of the Month Mayor of the Avenue Avenue Spotlight Award Avenue Veteran Shutterbugs' Best KICK ME!

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    Of course not.
     
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  3. Beasley

    Beasley Walking the driveway

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    It sounds like Adelie is already weaning herself, why rush her when she is almost there? If she’s healthy, happy and exploring eating new food, todo bien!
     
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  4. tka

    tka Jogging around the block

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    Eh, she's doing it but in her own sweet time. I suspect you'll have to keep the night feed for a while longer because it's a comfort thing.

    You're raising a sweet, confident, happy bird who feels utterly secure around you. There's no point in putting her through the stress of forcibly withdrawing food from her just because she's not conforming to someone else's timetable.
     
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  5. sunnysmom

    sunnysmom Joyriding the Neighborhood Celebirdy of the Month Mayor of the Avenue Avenue Spotlight Award Avenue Veteran I Can't Stop Posting!

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    I've never dealt with babies but I remember a respected breeder from a cockatiel forum that I used to belong to talking about her one baby tiel not weaning for I think almost 5 months (tiels usually wean at 8-10 weeks). I remember because her daughter made him a little tie for "graduating" to a big bird when he finally weaned. So, I took from that, they wean when they're ready. I wouldn't force it. :)
     
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  6. Eloy

    Eloy Cruising the avenue Celebirdy of the Month Avenue Spotlight Award Avenue Veteran Shutterbugs' Best

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    No.
    But if you think she will handle without that morning food, you can give her a small amount and then the rest in a bowl that is placed next to her. Just to see what happens.
    If she is changing behavior go back to what you did. And also feed her if she begs for it.
     
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  7. Zara

    Zara Rollerblading along the road Avenue Spotlight Award I Can't Stop Posting! POSTAHOLIC

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    That is what is seems like. this morning she only had a few ml of food. At night she still eats a fair amount.

    The vet knows I´m home most of the day because it was brought up in RE to the physio in the prev. consult. So conforming to my timetable is not an issue. I have all the time in the world for Adelie. He was quite solid that a bird must wean by XYZ week. He said ¨2.5months¨ so that is 10 weeks, which is about 2 weeks after the ¨norm¨ but still, he´s putting a time limit on weaning.

    I would understand the problem if I was only offering formula and there was no food, seeds, water, veg avail. for her. But she has all of that plus her formula, and she chooses what she wants.



    Thanks for the reassurance everyone.
    I was already intending to stick to how we was doing this. She is almost an adult now, her adult plumage is growing in. (I think the moult has driven the loss of desire for the morning feed).
    Obviously it is a little disheartnening to hear the vet advise me to cut off formula :(
     
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  8. tka

    tka Jogging around the block

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    Ah, I meant the vet's timetable - the "she should be weaned by X weeks" thing. I know you will adapt your schedule so you can feed her for as long as she asks for.
     
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  9. Beasley

    Beasley Walking the driveway

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    Even vets sometimes need to be taken with a grain of salt. Ten years I had vets pushing me to neuter my dog, it wasn’t medically necessary, just the status quo. This sounds more like the later too. Miss Adelie is lucky to have you ;)❤️
     
  10. melissasparrots

    melissasparrots Rollerblading along the road Celebirdy of the Month Mayor of the Avenue Avenue Spotlight Award Avenue Veteran

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    I think the right move is somewhere in between. If you follow many pet owners(with no actual breeding experience beyond what they read about palm cockatoos) they will tell you to let her hand-feed as long as she wants and give you lots of statistics about how wild birds are feeding their babies for a full year. Firstly, this isn't likely true of lovebirds and secondly, the occasional mouthful or regurgitate is not the same as an entire meal. Unfortunately, my experience with delayed development birds and those that have missed the weaning window is that they will often be difficult to wean. They have failed to wean at the time their body and instinct are telling them to strike out on their own and try new things. Instead, they have learned to depend on you. Sometimes, you have to do it the old fashioned way and force them...a little. Yes, such a bird will if offered continue to hand feed WAY passed when they should have stopped. I've even heard of people still hand-feeding their cockatiel at two years old which is not healthy. I would not cold turkey her. I'd put her on 1 hand-feed a day and maintain that for at least a week or more and then slowly phase it out. She will likely cry and loose weight and generally convince you that you are horrible for not feeding her. If she is truly developmentally delayed as in something is physically wrong with her, then you will have to proceed carefully and consult your vet if you think she has lost too much weight.
    Also, beware not to let her slurp down as much as she wants in that one hand-feeding. She should not be allowed to eat an entire day's worth of food in one hand-feeding. Stick to the 10-12% of her body weight. And personally, I'd do this one and only feeding at night. So she is good and hungry during the day.
    If you don't just want to cut her down to one feed all at once, you can often give a partial(half or less) feeding for breakfast and immediately(no play time, no cuddles) dump her back into her cage with a bunch of very easy access food and then you leave the room. Don't come back for at least an hour or two so she has a chance to focus on eating like a grown up instead of crying at you. Many baby birds will eat at least a little bit on their own if you get them started with a partial hand-feed. The same strategy can be applied later on when you are trying to phase out the second hand-feeding.

    I've only had to do this twice. Once on a bird that was my fault. I was convinced the baby was under weight, so I kept trying to get weight on it by sweet talking it into eating formula when it should have been eating adult food. The second was with a neurologically messed up amazon baby that the parents had stepped on. Both missed the weaning window by a couple of months and it was stressful on both of us to get them eating on their own. The amazon was several months passed when she should have weaned and still acting dependent. It was not a sustainable situation for her to go on like that forever, nor was she ever going to not have problems. It would not have been good for her to add food dependence on top of poor coordination and other issues. A little tough love and frequent weight checks were the answer. And, she did already know how to eat, she just didn't want to eat enough to sustain herself or know that she needed to when she could just sit and cry and mommy would feed the poor neurologically challenged baby.
     
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